Making A Wedding Cake

Decorating By Ruth526 Updated 2 Jun 2012 , 8:51pm by RisingBakery

Ruth526 Posted 1 Jun 2012 , 8:37pm
post #1 of 7

Hello Everyone,
I need some advice on how to make a wedding cake for my sister.
She wants an all white three tier round cake. Should I frost it (i dont have much experience frosting) or use fondant? Also, what is the best way to stack them. The size pans I have are 12", 10" and 8".
Recipes, techniques or any advice would be greatly appreciated. Its going to be a small family wedding on July in California
Thanks!
LL

6 replies
idgalpal Posted 1 Jun 2012 , 9:01pm
post #2 of 7

There are many things you need to think about -
How will you support/stack the tiers? This is a huge consideration.
The picture looks like fondant to me. If you've never worked with fondant, you might want to try your hand it at before you attempt it on the wedding cake.
Best of luck to you!

MimiFix Posted 1 Jun 2012 , 9:28pm
post #3 of 7

How nice, a wedding cake for your sister! There are many free videos online that can show you how to put together a cake. I suggest you watch those and try making a small two-tiered cake. Buttercream! Good luck!

Amylou Posted 2 Jun 2012 , 2:44am
post #4 of 7

My first question is where in CA? If you're down south...then the temps may not be too bad in July...if you're more up north, chances are it's going to be pretty hot. If that's the case, def use a shortening-based buttercream. Whether you decide to use fondant or BC, fondant will still require BC underneath so you will have to ice it regardless.

There are many many steps in the process of making a 3-tiered cake. I would do much research like in the videos Mimi suggested. I would even do a practice cake (maybe a smaller scale) before the event.

Good luck!

SoFloGuy Posted 2 Jun 2012 , 2:51am
post #5 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth526

Hello Everyone,
I need some advice on how to make a wedding cake for my sister.
She wants an all white three tier round cake. Should I frost it (i dont have much experience frosting) or use fondant? Also, what is the best way to stack them. The size pans I have are 12", 10" and 8".
Recipes, techniques or any advice would be greatly appreciated. Its going to be a small family wedding on July in California
Thanks!




Wait, you have more experiences with fondant than with frosting, I thought with most people it was the other way around. Anyway it's for a small family wedding so they are less forgiving, do your best, your sister knows you can make a great cake. Best of luck

EvMarie Posted 2 Jun 2012 , 3:20am
post #6 of 7

Being an intermediate cake person...& I'm just now starting to stack cakes....here are my tips. Of course this depends on your confidence & patience level being somewhat of a beginner.

(1) Personally, I would skip the fondant. It's hard enough to get buttercream smooth enough to be happy with it when your just starting...with out adding all the issues with fondant.

(2) If you go with just buttercream. I would of course try to nail down a system to smooth. But, just in case...I'd prepare with a back up alternative buttercream application. I've seen some buttercream cakes where I think they apply icing so it looks like scales or flower petals sorta. Not sure how they do it. With the back of a spoon? Or a particular tip? Also...there's a way to use an offset spatula and drag upward. You do this all the way around a cake. I did it on my bright blue stacked cake with angels. Mine looked "okay"....I'm sure it could be neater.

These alternative buttercream applications could still look stunning.

(3) Construction. You NEED support. In my beginner brain I felt most comfortable with those plastic wilton thingys. They go with separator plates that have notches that fit inside these big plastic supports. As long as you cut all of them level....you KNOW the cake will be supported. You could alter the design you posted a tiny bit & cut the supports a bit longer so there's a bunch of space in between both cakes. Then, place flowers in that space. Just an idea.

Now, I choose wood dowels. I'm really wanting to try those bubble straws, they seem easy to cut but I haven't had the motivation to find them. Just do what you feel comfortable with & definitely do a couple trial runs. You should try to enjoy the whole thing.

Good Luck!

RisingBakery Posted 2 Jun 2012 , 8:51pm
post #7 of 7

If I was you and I had more experience with fondant then thats the way I would go. Also when it comes to stacking the cakes I never use anything but cake separator plates, I used to use dowels when I first started and they just don't support a heavy fondant covered cake like the seperator plates do. I will never use anything else again.

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