How Do You Move The Cake Around??? And Stacking???

Decorating By Wildgirl Updated 26 May 2012 , 2:00pm by Wildgirl

Wildgirl Posted 24 May 2012 , 9:39pm
post #1 of 15

When the bc has to go over the bottom board (for the gift cake) and you won't be putting a concealing border around the bottom, how do you frost and decorate the cake and then move it without ruining it?

I'm thinking that I will do the bottom layer, then the next layer tomorrow, but I'm not sure if I should set the top two then or wait until I get to the event on Sat (about 3 hours away). I'd love to know it was all done, but at the same time, then I'd have to worry about tipping in the car. But the more I have to move the layers, the more chance of messing up the icing.

Help!

14 replies
DianeLM Posted 25 May 2012 , 12:37am
post #2 of 15

Are you using a sturdy support system like SPS or Stress Free Supports? If so, you can stack in advance and transport fully assembled. Place the cakes in the freezer for about 20 minutes to firm up the icing. Then, you can slide a thin spatula underneath and transfer it to it's final position.

If you plan to stack at the destination, I suggest you build your cake on a central dowel. Drill a hole in each upper tier cake's board before you decorate.

Drive a long dowel through the bottom tier into the base board (which should be at least 1 inch thick).

When you get to your destination, slide a thin spatula under the tier, lift it, position the hole over the dowel, lower the cake over the dowel, then let go. The cake will land on the dowels below.

As for decorating over the edge of the board, I use either a piece of non-skid pad or double-sided tape on a plastic Tuff board that is larger than the cake.

Wildgirl Posted 25 May 2012 , 6:12am
post #3 of 15

I'm using the sps system - thanks for the tip on putting the cake in the freezer for a bit first - that would help a lot, I'm sure. I hope to be able to stack them all before we go, but I'm not sure.... even though I know the sps is really stable, I'm still a bit paranoid, especially with the distance we have to go.

carmijok Posted 25 May 2012 , 5:10pm
post #4 of 15

Just make sure your surface is flat and that you have a rubber mesh drawer liner under it so it will not slide. Keep your air conditioner on full blast. If I were you I'd get a box the same diameter as the base of your cake board and cut down the sides so it opens in the front and you can slide your cake in. If you take the flaps and tape them up together you'll get a nice tall box that will protect your cake from flying objects or any bumps from other objects that may be in your car. If you're going to be driving 3 hours you need as much protection as you can get.

Wildgirl Posted 25 May 2012 , 5:27pm
post #5 of 15

Ok, thank you - if I don't finish the cake first, then I will for sure do that.

carmijok Posted 25 May 2012 , 6:35pm
post #6 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wildgirl

Ok, thank you - if I don't finish the cake first, then I will for sure do that.




My advice was for a finished and stacked cake.

Wildgirl Posted 25 May 2012 , 7:00pm
post #7 of 15

OH!! Sorry - that is a good idea. I'm not in my right mind at the moment. icon_eek.gificon_biggrin.gif Dh will be around a little later - I will get him on that. So is it better then to not actually SEE the cake when you're driving, or to turn back and look every 30 seconds for 3 hours.... Hmmmm.... Maybe it is better not to know. Gotta trust that sps.

DianeLM Posted 25 May 2012 , 7:23pm
post #8 of 15

I usually advise against looking at the cake while driving for obvious reasons. However, in the interest of optimal air circulation, I suggest placing the finished cake in a box as described by carmijok, but leave the front facing flap open so the air conditioning can go right to the cake.

I assume you're transporting in a van or SUV? Your cake is safest in the center of the vehicle. Don't put it in the way-back. Remember where the school bus ride was bumpiest? Yeah.

Remember to put a piece of non-skid under the cake inside the box as well as under the box itself.

Wildgirl Posted 25 May 2012 , 7:37pm
post #9 of 15

In a van - we will take out the back row of seats. And I will be driving with dh on watch. But close to the middle seats is good. Eek. I've been busy all morning up til now and I'm only now beginning to work on the actual cakes. At least there's no piping.

DianeLM Posted 25 May 2012 , 7:40pm
post #10 of 15

Don't forget to wear a sweater. Last delivery I made, half my face was frost-bitten! Gotta get a cake-delivery ski mask! icon_smile.gif

Wildgirl Posted 25 May 2012 , 9:43pm
post #11 of 15

icon_lol.gif I was already imagining my poor 7 year old shivering and complaining the whole way there! I will have to make sure we all have coats on for sure!

The base is all wrapped pretty in that cake foil (I didn't realize you could buy that by the roll until I was poking around Sugarcraft!) and the bottom cake is crumb coated and in the fridge (it's a 3 layer yellow w/layer of frosting & strab preserves for fillings - delicious!)
I just took the lemon cakes out of the freezer to start working on them for the next tier. Have a yummy (Ina Gartner's) lemon curd waiting to fill that one.
Back to work!

carmijok Posted 25 May 2012 , 11:01pm
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by DianeLM

I However, in the interest of optimal air circulation, I suggest placing the finished cake in a box as described by carmijok, but leave the front facing flap open so the air conditioning can go right to the cake.
The cake box will be open at the top and the air will get in with no problem. If you leave it open it negates the point of not having any bumping or flying object issues.


Remember to put a piece of non-skid under the cake inside the box as well as under the box itself.




Not a bad idea for peace of mind...you can't have enough of that ;D...but if you have the base of the box the same diameter as your cake board there should be no sliding. icon_smile.gif

Wildgirl Posted 26 May 2012 , 1:45am
post #13 of 15

Icing these "boxes" is dedious!!!! And of course not going too smoothly. But it's working - and I'm working from largest to smallest so it's only going to get easier. I hope! icon_lol.gif (hey, at least I'm not in tears! - it's not midnight YET!)

DianeLM Posted 26 May 2012 , 1:44pm
post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by carmijok

Quote:
Originally Posted by DianeLM

I However, in the interest of optimal air circulation, I suggest placing the finished cake in a box as described by carmijok, but leave the front facing flap open so the air conditioning can go right to the cake.
The cake box will be open at the top and the air will get in with no problem. If you leave it open it negates the point of not having any bumping or flying object issues.


Remember to put a piece of non-skid under the cake inside the box as well as under the box itself.



Not a bad idea for peace of mind...you can't have enough of that ;D...but if you have the base of the box the same diameter as your cake board there should be no sliding. icon_smile.gif




Yes, but if she keeps the front of the box open for air circulation, there is the possibility of sliding. icon_smile.gif

Wildgirl Posted 26 May 2012 , 2:00pm
post #15 of 15

It weighs a ton... if it slides we have a major problem!

It's basically done now. I will probably finish the peony decorations there. Have to frost the kitchen cake,but that's not a problem.

It is pouring right now... need to check the weather. Hope it lets up soon.

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