Won't It Settle After It Gets To Room Temp?

Decorating By bakencake Updated 24 May 2012 , 1:57pm by Ashleyssweetdesigns

bakencake Posted 23 May 2012 , 4:16pm
post #1 of 14

I'm used to American butter cream. I know how to build a dam and how to let is settle so it won't make a bulge. I've switched over to SMBC. I understand that after you tort you put it in the fridge and let it get hard. My question is- when it comes to room temp won't it compromise it and make a bulge?
thank you

13 replies
bakencake Posted 23 May 2012 , 4:32pm
post #2 of 14

anyone?

aprilismaius Posted 23 May 2012 , 4:40pm
post #3 of 14

You should let it settle before it goes into refrigeration.

bakencake Posted 23 May 2012 , 4:49pm
post #4 of 14

Thank you! that's what I thought. With the tile? How long? as long as the American?

AZCouture Posted 23 May 2012 , 5:05pm
post #5 of 14

I've never bothered with the tile trick. I let it settle for maybe 30 minutes to an hour at the longest after pressing down a little bit. What I do though, is smooth extra buttercream around the seam where the layers meet up. If after a half or so, that seam is still nice and flat and not showing signs of bulging, it's not going to matter waiting any longer. Chilling the cake after icing locks the whole tier into place, from what I've found. I deliver chilled, so it comes to temp sitting still, and I've never heard that it bulged or looked unsightly.

bakencake Posted 23 May 2012 , 10:43pm
post #6 of 14

Thank you AZ, I love SMBC and it's about to get hot in TX

AZCouture Posted 23 May 2012 , 10:48pm
post #7 of 14

I definitely do a ring of plain SMBC that contains the filling though. It is so hot here already. Have to be careful for the next few months.

jenmat Posted 23 May 2012 , 11:56pm
post #8 of 14

Maybe I'm weird, but I've never let a cake settle. I use IMBC, which is pretty much the same deal, I do a dam, fill, press down and slap it in the fridge to chill. Never had a bulge. Maybe I don't do very thick layers of filling or something, but I've always been curious about that.

Oh, I also bake in 4 layers, so I think that's what is the difference.

srkmilklady Posted 24 May 2012 , 12:24am
post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by jenmat

Maybe I'm weird, but I've never let a cake settle. I use IMBC, which is pretty much the same deal, I do a dam, fill, press down and slap it in the fridge to chill. Never had a bulge. Maybe I don't do very thick layers of filling or something, but I've always been curious about that.

Oh, I also bake in 4 layers, so I think that's what is the difference.




I have just lately started using IMBC for almost all of my cakes. But I have been wondering about using it for the dam...the fact that it is such a soft buttercream...does it really help? Or is there some way to thicken it for using as the dam? So far I haven't used any other fillings other than just using the IMBC between layers, but if I wanted to use a fruit filling for example, would it help to contain it? icon_confused.gif This might sound like a dumb question, icon_redface.gif but I was taught in the Wilton classes to have a thicker buttercream to use for a dam.

Any advice would be appreciated...thanks! icon_smile.gif

Ashleyssweetdesigns Posted 24 May 2012 , 12:29am
post #10 of 14

I also recentley switched to SMBC. I never use a damn because all my fillings are usually fruit flavored SMBC. Theres no need to let it settle or use the tile. I do smooth the sides and file in any gaps before I pop it in the fridge after about 20 minutes or so I cover the rest of the cake. Never had a problem.

AZCouture Posted 24 May 2012 , 1:02am
post #11 of 14

Honestly, the only reason I pipe a dam, is so I can spread the filling in the middle, and know that I've got a nice even layer across the layer, and I don't have to build the edges up. Everything stays nice and neat that way, and I know I have a nice even layer of filling.

jenmat Posted 24 May 2012 , 1:31pm
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by srkmilklady

Quote:
Originally Posted by jenmat

Maybe I'm weird, but I've never let a cake settle. I use IMBC, which is pretty much the same deal, I do a dam, fill, press down and slap it in the fridge to chill. Never had a bulge. Maybe I don't do very thick layers of filling or something, but I've always been curious about that.

Oh, I also bake in 4 layers, so I think that's what is the difference.



I have just lately started using IMBC for almost all of my cakes. But I have been wondering about using it for the dam...the fact that it is such a soft buttercream...does it really help? Or is there some way to thicken it for using as the dam? So far I haven't used any other fillings other than just using the IMBC between layers, but if I wanted to use a fruit filling for example, would it help to contain it? icon_confused.gif This might sound like a dumb question, icon_redface.gif but I was taught in the Wilton classes to have a thicker buttercream to use for a dam.

Any advice would be appreciated...thanks! icon_smile.gif




I pipe a dam all the time with just regular IMBC. Like Yuma, I just use to to balance out the fillings. I haven't found it all that soft though. It's definitely not thick like American Buttercream, but I wouldn't call it soft either. Maybe you need to add more butter or cook the sugar longer? Mine is nice and sturdy and my recipe is the normal Warren Brown one. Another trick I noticed is that I use a big cupcake tip to pipe the dam, half on and half off the edge. Then add the filling, put the next tier on top and use a spat to "seal" it in by smoothing out the icing that is sticking out. Does that make sense?

AZCouture Posted 24 May 2012 , 1:52pm
post #13 of 14

Jenmat, exactly! Well I use a coupler without that side notch, but same thing.

Ashleyssweetdesigns Posted 24 May 2012 , 1:57pm
post #14 of 14

U can't compare Wilton bc which is American bc to European bc there two different recipes. American bc has different consistencies u can achieve. You can't do that with meringue bc's.

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