Baking Bread

Lounge By escaliba1234 Updated 27 Jun 2012 , 3:39am by luvmysmoother

escaliba1234 Posted 23 May 2012 , 10:34am
post #1 of 30

Is there anyone out there who would like to chat and exchange advice and tips on bread making, please? icon_smile.gif

29 replies
Mommacoz Posted 23 May 2012 , 10:46am
post #2 of 30

I rediscovered my bread machine last holiday season, I used it to make the dough for cinnamon rolls and since then I think I have made at least 1 loaf a week. At one time I made two loaves in one day. There is nothing like waking up to the smell of fresh baked bread.

I did get some recipe books to start making some different types of breads. I would like to make some in the oven and see if there is a difference in the breads than in the machine.

MimiFix Posted 23 May 2012 , 12:42pm
post #3 of 30

I make bread; love the taste of real homemade bread! I have some issues with my hands so mostly I use my breadmachine on the dough cycle and shape/bake the dough after it's been kneaded in the machine.

SweetP Posted 23 May 2012 , 12:54pm
post #4 of 30

I love making bread. The last batch I made was a honey wheat bread that used part bread flour and part whole wheat. Found the recipe online. I use my stand mixer with the dough hook to knead most of it then hand knead for the last minute or two. Nothing better than the smell of bread dough rising.

AnnieCahill Posted 23 May 2012 , 1:20pm
post #5 of 30

How exciting. I was hoping that Jackie or Heath would make a separate topic for non cake baking. I would love to be able to post pictures of bread or other baked goods.

I am thinking of trying my hand at croissants. I also have a bread machine which is nice but it kind of over-bakes the bottom crust. I need some decent loaf pans. It's not something I do very often. Thefreshloaf.com is a great place for bread baking!

MimiFix Posted 23 May 2012 , 1:38pm
post #6 of 30

I love The Fresh Loaf. Posters are very helpful and verrrry nice people. No flame wars allowed on that site!

snowboarder Posted 25 May 2012 , 5:01am
post #7 of 30

I love The Fresh Loaf too. I've got two sourdough starters going. It took awhile to get them going but they're doing great now. I just wish I had more time to experiment.

escaliba1234 Posted 26 May 2012 , 9:19am
post #8 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by escaliba1234

Is there anyone out there who would like to chat and exchange advice and tips on bread making, please? icon_smile.gif




I made this initial post on behalf of my daughter, who has taken on the task of supplying our family with home made breads.
At age 24, she does a wonderful job, always experimenting with different recipes.
Understandably, she would like to talk to people with the same interest, hence my post.
After such a positive response, she will join CakeCentral herself and start posting.
I do appreciate the response from you all and any advice and suggestions you might share with my daughter. icon_smile.gif

Escaliba25 Posted 26 May 2012 , 8:25pm
post #9 of 30

Hi all,
The original post was made by my mum in aid of me having some difficulties with a fruit bread which appeared to be lovely light and moist on the outside yet uncooked on the inside.
I have just discoered bread making and am enjoying making it part of my weekly doings for the family.
Would love to see an active forum here as help is always appreciated.
I made a apple/cinnamon swirl chelsea bun for the family yesterday and had again, some difficulties with the inside not being cooked to time. Mum came up with teo ingenous ideas:
1) put the baking nail in the centre (to act as a heating core)
2) as the top seemed done and we didn't want to burn it, we took the bun (in a 9 inch round cake tin) out and had it upside down in the oven for an extra 10min. Worked a treat.

It appears that some cake making ideas are invaluable for bread making too which is why starting a forum here is just a good idea!

Still would like some advice on baking times of fruit loaves and compaisions of times/temps with White/WM flour mixes.

Thank you! icon_smile.gif

escaliba1234 Posted 29 May 2012 , 8:33am
post #10 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by SweetP

I love making bread. The last batch I made was a honey wheat bread that used part bread flour and part whole wheat. Found the recipe online. I use my stand mixer with the dough hook to knead most of it then hand knead for the last minute or two. Nothing better than the smell of bread dough rising.




Sounds wonderful!
Would you share the recipe, please?

escaliba1234 Posted 29 May 2012 , 8:36am
post #11 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mommacoz

I rediscovered my bread machine last holiday season, I used it to make the dough for cinnamon rolls and since then I think I have made at least 1 loaf a week. At one time I made two loaves in one day. There is nothing like waking up to the smell of fresh baked bread.

I did get some recipe books to start making some different types of breads. I would like to make some in the oven and see if there is a difference in the breads than in the machine.




Would you care to post some of your favourite recipes, please?

escaliba1234 Posted 29 May 2012 , 8:43am
post #12 of 30

I think we might have the interest for the bread making/recipes out there.
Perhaps we could start posting some recipes and helpful hints.
Maybe we could earn our own forum heading, out of The Lounge?
Just an idea for the moderators to consider.

escaliba1234 Posted 29 May 2012 , 10:28am
post #13 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by snowboarder

I love The Fresh Loaf too. I've got two sourdough starters going. It took awhile to get them going but they're doing great now. I just wish I had more time to experiment.




Would love to see any ideas for cultures or starters for bread.
Would especially like to hear from people who have successfully made cultures/starters and how they went about it.
Daughter would like to try this soon.

Escaliba25 Posted 29 May 2012 , 9:06pm
post #14 of 30

Honey Wheat was next on my list actually. Really want to try it.

I do not have a bread making machine but am enjoying using thee conventional oven.

I am going to try some using the starters. Anyone have any good recipes or places to point me for tips and points on starters and the use of them?
Also how does one substitute a regular dry active yeast recipe with a starter? Or can't one?

scp1127 Posted 30 May 2012 , 8:46am
post #15 of 30

I love baking bread. I think I've done it all (once), but especially love making buttery brioche. I use it as the base for some of my desserts in my business.

Unfortunately, I'm a baker who does not like but the mildest of sourdoughs. I love white bread.

I have used my bread machine for the dough, but since I've gotten the KA Pro610, it does it better than the bread machine (except for when it wants to run off the table). I literally have to put it on the floor to make the brioche.

I would love to see a category for bread.

imagenthatnj Posted 30 May 2012 , 2:53pm
post #16 of 30

I love baking bread, too. A few years ago, I wanted to do it all by hand, but now I use the my Cuisinart and just for fun, end kneading by hand.

I use Peter Reinhart's book The Bread Baker's Apprentice, and read thefreshloaf, theknewadforbread and artisanbreadinfive. When a breakfast recipe requires a fancy bread, I have to start a few days ahead...because I'm making the bread, not buying it.

My favorite bread is brioche, followed by bagels, kugelhopf, houska, ciabatta and focaccia...

It would be so exciting to have a category for bread, yes!

SweetSouthernBakery Posted 30 May 2012 , 3:09pm
post #17 of 30

I got a recipe and starter from my SIL for an amazing homemade bread. It's actually called a Sour Dough Bread but it doesn't have the sour taste at all so I love it. I've gotten out of the habit of making it but this thread makes me want to start making it again. And I too would love to have some of the OP daughters recipes. icon_smile.gif

JadedJenn Posted 3 Jun 2012 , 3:19am
post #18 of 30

My husband is into bread baking. He really likes Peter Reinhart's books.

BakingIrene Posted 4 Jun 2012 , 3:46pm
post #19 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escaliba25

Hi all,
The original post was made by my mum in aid of me having some difficulties with a fruit bread which appeared to be lovely light and moist on the outside yet uncooked on the inside.
I have just discoered bread making and am enjoying making it part of my weekly doings for the family.
Would love to see an active forum here as help is always appreciated.
I made a apple/cinnamon swirl chelsea bun for the family yesterday and had again, some difficulties with the inside not being cooked to time.




Please give us information such as the size of pan and weight of dough to tell us how big your loaf is. You might be trying to bake a very thick loaf. Please tell us: Is the dough at room temperature or was it chilled when you shaped the loaf?

You might be letting the loaf rise too long in the pan. Time the last proof/rise (after you have shaped your bread). For sweet bread dough, give it 45 minutes in a room at 65-70'F when the dough is also at room temperature. NOT LONGER regardless of what the recipe might say. It is supposed to rise some more in the oven.

"Moist" appearance on the outside for a yeast dough means that it's uncooked. Yeast dough will bake to a dry feeling crust although the inside will be tender. That's because of the gluten developed in kneading, unlike quick breads or cakes. A sweet bread will have a very thin dry crust, but it will definitely feel dry.

Preheat your oven to the temperature in the recipe. For sweet bread, turn the heat down by 25'F after the first half hour of baking. Keep baking until the bread tests "done": the room smells like "done" bread, and the loaf gives a hollow sound when you tap the top with your knuckle. Cover with foil if it's getting too dark.

I prefer to use light coloured pans for all kinds of bread as well as cake, using bakers parchment to line. Pyrex (clear tempered glass) is also good but needs to be greased with butter/margarine/shortening.

I think there should be a separate forum for non-cake baking: people already do cookies and other sweet goods, they may as well all be lumped into one forum.

Helenw78 Posted 6 Jun 2012 , 1:58pm
post #20 of 30

Ditto to what ^^^ they said. I make hot crossed buns and sweet breads and savioury pull aparts (similiar to the chelsea bun only savioury). Don't pack the pan to much either before you set aside for the last proof or it will be too dense not cook well.

enjoy baking icon_smile.gif

Escaliba25 Posted 7 Jun 2012 , 7:41am
post #21 of 30

The ingredients list for the recipe is as follows:
3.5 cups AP Flour (+ extra for kneading)
.5 cup WW Flour
2.25 cups water
1 tsp salt
1.5 tbsp Sugar
1 tbsp Oil
1 packet yeast
250gm fruit (I used a mix of chopped apricots, sultanas and raisins)
Cinnamon and Nutmeg

1. Soak fruit in warm water for 10min. Drain thoroughly.
1. Add 1/4 cup water, 1/2 tbsp sugar and yeast and let sit for 10min.
3. In a bowl add 2 cups water, oil, salt and remaining sugar
4. Mix 3 cups of flour slowly, stiring to remove lumps.
5. Add yeast/sugar mix and combine well.
6. Add remaining flour
7. Knead for 8 min. Knead drained fruit into dough
8. Cover in plastic wrap and let rise in 80F area until doubled (approx 1 hours)
9. Punch down, divide in half, round up and cover. Let dough rest 10-15min.
10. Shape into loaves and place in greased sheet pans. Cover with damp towl and let rise until doubled in size.
11. Bake in 425F oven for 30 to 35 minutes for round loaves, 15 to 20 minutes for long, thin loaves

The pan was an 8 x 4-inch baking loaf pan. I cannot remember the weight of the dough (and seemingly lost my piece of paper that i dutifully wrote it out on), however the above recipe was split into 2 pans of the same size. In my (very inexperienced) opinion, they over rose (more than doubled) in too quick a time. The dough was at room temperature of about 67F.

On attempt 2 of the same recipe, I still think it was not quite right. I brought the temperature down to 350F but did NOT drop the temperature after 30min. It was not as bad and was cooked but again I think I over-proofed it. It was quite brown on the top as well but I did not foil it. Is the recipe all right by normal standards or am I just getting in the loop of things.

I will try it next time dropping the temp down 30 degrees after 30min as suggested for all sweet yeast breads.

Is it recommended that I chill the loaf and/or extend out the rising time by doing this? Is this a typical thing to do for the sweet fruited breads? I have yet to trial out extension of rising time by cooling methods for any loaf but any tips, hints and/or advice would be greatly appreciated.

I would love to get this recipe working or else find another cinnamon fruit loaf recipe to try (without milk!)

MimiFix Posted 7 Jun 2012 , 11:15am
post #22 of 30

Your recipe does look delicious! The original recipe temp appears way too high. You're right to use 350, then drop it only if the top begins to look too dark. An instant read thermometer may help in checking for doneness. (Is that a word?) Every recipe has its own best temp; start with 200 degrees F. When the loaf appears fully baked, push the thermometer into the center and if it registers 200, remove the bread from the oven.

Another way to check for doneness - turn the loaf out of the pan and knock lightly on the bottom. If it sounds "hollow" it should be done. If you hear a thud, bake it for another 5 minutes and test again.

This bread is very low in fat and sweetener; this results in a lean type bread. A sweet bread has more sugar and fat, regardless of the addition on fruit.

Escaliba25 Posted 7 Jun 2012 , 11:53am
post #23 of 30

Thank you for your advice. I am determined to get this one working!!

I have read about the instant read thermometer's and am looking about to find one. They do not appear to be super common here to Australia so am looking at getting one from an online resource. I believe this will help me a LOT when baking as I am now nervous about times and doneness.

I read that sweet breads usually take longer to rise rather than the leaner doughs which makes me question that although this has the addition of fruit, is it to be classified as the typical 'lean bread'.

BakingIrene Posted 7 Jun 2012 , 1:21pm
post #24 of 30

DO NOT let the shaped dough proof to double its size, or chill it to extent the final rise.

Give it 45 minutes for the final rise regardless of what the recipe says. It will rise to the proper height in the oven at 350F. Please trust me on this.

What you can do at the 45 minute mark is put the loaves into the cold oven and immediately turn on the heat. The total baking time will be the same. You will learn just how much oven rising there really will be.

GarciaGM Posted 7 Jun 2012 , 1:58pm
post #25 of 30

I'm wondering if this recipe has too much water. When I bake plain white bread, I use about 2.25 cups of water to 6 cups of bread flour. This recipe only calls for 4 cups of flour to the same amount of water, plus it has fruit added in. Escaliba, can you describe how soft and moist the dough is as you're preparing it? Maybe I'm off-base, but that's the only thing that struck me as unusual when I read the recipe. Otherwise it sounds divine.

BakingIrene Posted 7 Jun 2012 , 2:06pm
post #26 of 30

The recipe is OK. I always add more liquid to a fixed amount of flour than the bread recipe calls for.

I mix yeast dough exactly the way described here, and you adjust the flour while you are kneading. It means the bread will never be too dry.

The final rising to double causes the problem: the middle collapses and therefore does not cook.

Escaliba25 Posted 8 Jun 2012 , 4:08am
post #27 of 30

Thank you to all who have given helpful advice. I will most certainly log my attempts for round 3 (later this week) and update all on progress...

To work with it was quite a moist dough and I did need to add extra flour. The fruit was soaked, drained and added but I did not flour the fruit to stop it from sticking together (a tip i read somewhere).

Here is a photo of my attempt two (amongst other breads) to give people a bit of an idea what it came out like. This was cooked all the way through but did not have the light fruit bread taste i was looking for. The family tells me it was good but I am certainly not convinced!

It is the fruited bread amongst honey oat, multi and whole grain.

http://s124.photobucket.com/albums/p29/snaffs/?action=view¤t=Bread2.jpg

BakingIrene Posted 8 Jun 2012 , 1:40pm
post #28 of 30

Your bread looks right. You also did right to add more flour, to get the right consistency.

Next time you might want to increase the oil and sugar to 3TB each. You may use milk instead of water which will make the loaf more like what you have in mind. Heat the milk to lukewarm before adding to the dough.

I usually do not flour the fruit for yeast bread--I drain it well after soaking it, and I add it moist. It does not change the texture of the well kneaded dough enough to notice.

costumeczar Posted 9 Jun 2012 , 1:44am
post #29 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by escaliba1234

Quote:
Originally Posted by snowboarder

I love The Fresh Loaf too. I've got two sourdough starters going. It took awhile to get them going but they're doing great now. I just wish I had more time to experiment.



Would love to see any ideas for cultures or starters for bread.
Would especially like to hear from people who have successfully made cultures/starters and how they went about it.
Daughter would like to try this soon.




I'm starting a sourdough starter right now, it's only on day three. I'm documenting the process and will put it upon my blog when it's a couple of weeks old. My family almost killed each other fighting over a loaf of sourdough form Panera, so I thought I'd get a starter going again.

luvmysmoother Posted 27 Jun 2012 , 3:39am
post #30 of 30

I also recently rediscovered the joy of bread making. And I used to hate kneading dough but don't mind anymore because of the years of fondant kneadingicon_smile.gif I want to try a yeasted cornbread recipe and also want to make panda bread....sooooo cuteicon_smile.gif I recently tried making a "stuffing" bread and it was pretty good. Just a basic bread recipe with diced and sauteed celery, onions, and parsley mixed in. Bread is as awesome as cakeicon_smile.gif

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