In A Bit Of Trouble!! Help!!

Decorating By diamondsmom Updated 19 May 2012 , 11:55pm by vtcake

diamondsmom Posted 12 May 2012 , 3:31pm
post #1 of 15

Hi guys, so i made a babyshower cake for a friend of mines finished all the decorating and stacking today...3 tiers (6/8/11) for some reason I really thought the shower was today, unfortunately it's for the 20th....almost 7 days away! Can I store the cake in the fridge with fondant boxed up until then? will it dry out? i really can't afford to waste all that cake and fondant.....My stomach is in knots and i feel like crap icon_sad.gificon_sad.gificon_sad.gif

14 replies
abchambers Posted 12 May 2012 , 4:23pm
post #2 of 15

I know it stinks, but I would just suck it up and start all over in a week. I'd hate to even risk serving a stale/dried out cake. You could donate that one to a shelter or serve it to family/friends, but definitely start over fresh in my opinion.

dynee Posted 12 May 2012 , 4:37pm
post #3 of 15

Don't feel too bad about it. I did the same thing only the event was 2 weeks away. It was the afghan cake in my pics. I just took off the gumpaste rattle and put it away for later and we enjoyed the cake at a family gathering. When I did it over for the real event, it turned out all that much better for the practice.

carmijok Posted 12 May 2012 , 4:38pm
post #4 of 15

You could salvage the cake by freezing it....but I would take it apart first...including the fondant. Wrap your cakes tightly with saran wrap and freeze them. Even if there's buttercream on them, that's OK. Buttercream freezes nicely. Just make sure your cakes are wrapped well. You might have to re-ice a bit to smooth things out later, but that's no big deal.

If you can take your fondant off and it's pliable, why not just roll it up and plan on using it again? Even if you can't wipe all the buttercream off the back, a little of that mixed in won't hurt your fondant.

If you have decor like bows and flowers, just remove those and keep them in a dark cool area covered with a paper towel so air can circulate and get them good and dry if they already aren't.

Anyway, this is what I would do if I absolutely did not want to re-bake.

step0nmi Posted 12 May 2012 , 5:10pm
post #5 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by carmijok

You could salvage the cake by freezing it....but I would take it apart first...including the fondant. Wrap your cakes tightly with saran wrap and freeze them. Even if there's buttercream on them, that's OK. Buttercream freezes nicely. Just make sure your cakes are wrapped well. You might have to re-ice a bit to smooth things out later, but that's no big deal.

If you can take your fondant off and it's pliable, why not just roll it up and plan on using it again? Even if you can't wipe all the buttercream off the back, a little of that mixed in won't hurt your fondant.

If you have decor like bows and flowers, just remove those and keep them in a dark cool area covered with a paper towel so air can circulate and get them good and dry if they already aren't.

Anyway, this is what I would do if I absolutely did not want to re-bake.




i agree!!!
actually, i can attest to buttercream covered and frozen cake (wrapped tightly in saran of course)! did some samples and didn't want to waste them all and then when my husband and i had a craving a month after they were made they tasted even better!

arlenej Posted 12 May 2012 , 5:20pm
post #6 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by carmijok

You could salvage the cake by freezing it....but I would take it apart first...including the fondant. Wrap your cakes tightly with saran wrap and freeze them. Even if there's buttercream on them, that's OK. Buttercream freezes nicely. Just make sure your cakes are wrapped well. You might have to re-ice a bit to smooth things out later, but that's no big deal.

If you can take your fondant off and it's pliable, why not just roll it up and plan on using it again? Even if you can't wipe all the buttercream off the back, a little of that mixed in won't hurt your fondant.

If you have decor like bows and flowers, just remove those and keep them in a dark cool area covered with a paper towel so air can circulate and get them good and dry if they already aren't.
What she said! Really! There're times baking ahead is the only way I'l get some orders out on time, so that's what I'd do. Go ahead, three tiers are just too much to waste.

Anyway, this is what I would do if I absolutely did not want to re-bake.


Mexx Posted 12 May 2012 , 5:40pm
post #7 of 15

There's a thread somewhere on this site about freezing fondant covered cakes if you box it, wrap it twice in fondant and foil and then you defrost it in the fridge for a number of hours and then on the counter. I've actually got a fondant covered cake in my freezer right now that I'm testing to see if it works. I was under the impression that fondant will sweat when it starts to defrost but apparently you let it defrost still covered in all the wrap and it is supposed to be fine.

diamondsmom Posted 12 May 2012 , 6:22pm
post #8 of 15

Thanks a bunch guys! Mexx can you please let me how it works out for you

BlakesCakes Posted 12 May 2012 , 8:16pm
post #9 of 15

Don't take the cake apart or peel the fondant!!!! That's silly & a waste of time, product, & money!!!

Make space in the freezer. Box completed cake & wrap box in 2 layers of saran & 1 layer of foil, being careful to keep cake upright & level while doing so. Freeze.
24 hrs. before set up, place still wrapped box in fridge.
4-6 hrs. before display, sit still wrapped box on counter to come to room temp.
When time for display, carefully remove wrappings & box. Cake will be fine.

I know, I've done it.

Rae

DeniseNH Posted 12 May 2012 , 11:19pm
post #10 of 15

Yes, you can freeze fondant covered cakes. I took a class with a very famous decorator and she said that her customers have no idea that there cakes were frozen ahead of time so that she could teach the class. It's the method of defrosting that's the key. Place the cake in a cake box and wrap the box in a plastic bag or unscented garbage bag. Freeze. Then three days before it's delivered - place the box with the bag still over it in your refrigerator. The day it's to be delivered take the cake out of the fridge and unwrap then open the lid so that it can come to room temp. Any moisture during the defrosting phase in the fridge will end up on the outside of the plastic bag, keeping the box and cake dew-drop free.

BlakesCakes Posted 13 May 2012 , 12:15am
post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeniseNH

Yes, you can freeze fondant covered cakes. I took a class with a very famous decorator and she said that her customers have no idea that there cakes were frozen ahead of time so that she could teach the class. It's the method of defrosting that's the key. Place the cake in a cake box and wrap the box in a plastic bag or unscented garbage bag. Freeze. Then three days before it's delivered - place the box with the bag still over it in your refrigerator. The day it's to be delivered take the cake out of the fridge and unwrap then open the lid so that it can come to room temp. Any moisture during the defrosting phase in the fridge will end up on the outside of the plastic bag, keeping the box and cake dew-drop free.




Well, pretty much on target with what I've been advising for several years here on CC,
but I definitely disagree with opening the box &/or bags while it's the coming to room temp. It's during that time period that sweating would occur due to exposure to warm, moist room air.

I strongly advise NOT exposing a cold cake to room air until the cake has reached room temp in the wrapped box.

Also, I see no reason to put the box in the fridge for 3 days. No cake would need that long to defrost and extended refrigeration causes cake to go stale faster--that's why I advise 24hrs. for refrigeration.

Rae

diamondsmom Posted 13 May 2012 , 8:37pm
post #12 of 15

Thank you all sooooo much. I'm going to place it in the freezer right this minute! u guys are the best, fingers crossed!

KoryAK Posted 14 May 2012 , 3:49am
post #13 of 15

I second the 24 hours refrigeration.

matthewkyrankelly Posted 14 May 2012 , 4:05am
post #14 of 15

Rae is right. The condensation will occur on whatever the outside surface is. If you unwrap the cake, condensation occurs on the fondant. If you leave it wrapped tightly, the warm moist air won't have a chance to get up next to the fondant and get it wet before it come up to temp.

Box it, wrap it tight, and freezing is your friend.

vtcake Posted 19 May 2012 , 11:55pm
post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakesCakes

Don't take the cake apart or peel the fondant!!!! That's silly & a waste of time, product, & money!!!

Make space in the freezer. Box completed cake & wrap box in 2 layers of saran & 1 layer of foil, being careful to keep cake upright & level while doing so. Freeze.
24 hrs. before set up, place still wrapped box in fridge.
4-6 hrs. before display, sit still wrapped box on counter to come to room temp.
When time for display, carefully remove wrappings & box. Cake will be fine.

I know, I've done it.

Rae




That sounds way easier than taking the cake apart. I don't do fondant so can't help on that end. I don't think we should be criticizing others' suggestions for what has worked for them. Always start a criticism with a kind acknowledgement, for ex: "That's one way to do it, but here's what I do."

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