zespri Posted 2 May 2012 , 10:12am
post #1 of

Hi folks

When using the seeding method of tempering, is the chocolate that I add in when it hits the magic temperature supposed to be already tempered? Or is it just more of the un-tempered chocolate?

If it's already tempered, does that mean I should just buy a block of regular eating chocolate to use as my 'seeds' in my un-tempered chocolate?

9 replies
scp1127 Posted 2 May 2012 , 11:57am
post #2 of

No, it's the rest of the batch of untempered chocolate that will bring the temp up.

I've never mixed chocolates. I only know how to do it with a batch of the same.

Angiette Posted 2 May 2012 , 2:25pm
post #3 of

how do i temper chocolate? does it just have to be melted, then i add the leftover chocolate or does it really have to me checked for 'perfect temperature'?

KoryAK Posted 2 May 2012 , 5:49pm
post #4 of

It has to be perfect temp.

MimiFix Posted 2 May 2012 , 6:19pm
post #5 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by KoryAK

It has to be perfect temp.



I absolutely agree with Kory. There are some things I fudge, and I've mixed melts with chocolate by throwing everything in together. But when I'm working with100% real chocolate I never stray from exact temps.

zespri Posted 2 May 2012 , 7:35pm
post #6 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by scp1127

No, it's the rest of the batch of untempered chocolate that will bring the temp up.

I've never mixed chocolates. I only know how to do it with a batch of the same.




Thank you SCP, I read a few different tutorials which said "add the tempered chocolate" which got me confused. I'd much rather use the same chocolate.

BlakesCakes Posted 2 May 2012 , 9:00pm
post #7 of

When you temper chocolate using the seed method, you have taken a quantity of chocolate--which, by the way, is already "in temper", but just not in the shape/form you need it: liquid--and you've melted it (to a specific temperature based on the type of chocolate that is above the actual temp of "temper"). You then take more of the in-temper chocolate (the buttons, block, etc.) and add it to the melted chocolate to take it back down to it's proper temperature to be back in temper, removing any unmelted chocolate once you hit the right #.

Here's a good article that uses the seed method:

http://candy.about.com/od/candybasics/ht/temperchoc.htm

This article specifies the high temps for each type of chocolate, as well as the "in temper" temp you're looking to achieve:

http://chocomap.com/chocolate-making-tempering.php

Rae

zespri Posted 2 May 2012 , 10:19pm
post #8 of

Well I just had a go, wow it gets to temperature fast!

The chocolate seems so thick though, does anyone else have this problem? I am dipping orangettes, and it's leaving a very thick coating.

scp1127 Posted 3 May 2012 , 4:58am
post #9 of

It may depend on the chocolate you are using. If you give the brand and kind, maybe someone who uses that exact kind can answer.

zespri Posted 3 May 2012 , 7:21am
Quote:
Originally Posted by scp1127

It may depend on the chocolate you are using. If you give the brand and kind, maybe someone who uses that exact kind can answer.




Unless there is someone here also from New Zealand who happens to live in the same area as me, then it's unlikely anyone will know the brand.. But thanks anyway, I'll be interested to see how it goes with other brands.

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