Help Me With Roses Im New Here

Decorating By mamarachelnj Updated 17 Apr 2012 , 7:45am by cowdex

mamarachelnj Posted 17 Apr 2012 , 3:52am
post #1 of 5

im new to this website and new to cake decorating. i tried to make buttercream roses for the first time today and they kinda fell apart. so ive been looking online. the buttercream i used had no crisco in it. im seeing some people say use crisco as it wont melt like butter some people say use royal icing but some say its like cement. is there a way to do the roses with buttercream that will taste good too? do i use the same buttercream for the roses as i would to frost the cake or should i use an all butter recipe for the cake?

4 replies
soledad Posted 17 Apr 2012 , 4:12am
post #2 of 5

I hope the next links help you. Good luck thumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gif
In the first link it shows you by photos, click next to see the next picture.





Your butter cream has to be a bit stiffer, add a little more powder sugar to your icing.


CIAO

mamarachelnj Posted 17 Apr 2012 , 4:24am
post #3 of 5

thank u for ur response ill go look at the links now. so your saying its ok to use the all butter buttercream without crisco just add some more powdered sugar?

Unlimited Posted 17 Apr 2012 , 6:00am
post #4 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamarachelnj

im seeing some people say use crisco as it wont melt like butter some people say use royal icing but some say its like cement.




Yes, shortening isn't as soft as butter, and royal icing will dry rock-hard.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mamarachelnj

is there a way to do the roses with buttercream that will taste good too? do i use the same buttercream for the roses as i would to frost the cake or should i use an all butter recipe for the cake?




Shortening-based buttercream roses will hold up without drooping if it's stiff enough. You can use the same buttercream that you ice the cake with as long as you add more powdered sugar to stiffen it up for the roses.

If you make them ahead of time and let them air dry at room temperature, they'll still be soft enough to cut with a knife and easy to eat. They'll taste the same as any shortening-based buttercream.

I guess if you add enough PS to butter it might stiffen it up, but if you have hot hands it would be difficult to prevent it from melting while piping roses and if your house is warm it might not crust or dry as fast as shortening would.

If you're making roses on a rose nail without starting with a tall base they'll turn out short and flat with all petals at the same height leaving no room to angle the outer petals outward. I find making roses on a stick much easier to get the bud started opened and up high to allow plenty of space to add the next rows of petals that gradually fan out.

I made a video
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cowdex Posted 17 Apr 2012 , 7:45am
post #5 of 5

I use a wooden toothpick and a mini marshmellow as the base. I like to work with royal better - still yummy to eat - just harder.

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