Freezing Egg Yolks

Decorating By Gerle Updated 12 Apr 2012 , 3:10am by Gerle

Gerle Posted 11 Apr 2012 , 3:46am
post #1 of 6

I'm probably on the wrong forum for this question, but wasn't sure where to put it. For those of you who freeze egg yolks, what are they supposed to look like when you take them out and thaw them? I had some frozen yolks in the freezer (about a month old) that I decided to take out to make some ice cream with. I needed 12 yolks and that's what I had, so I was going to use them. However, when I took them out of the freezer and left in the fridge to thaw, they were almost like cooked yolks except softer. Not sure how to describe them exactly, but I wasn't sure they would work for what I needed them for and ended up throwing them out. I was thinking that when they thawed, they would be as soft as they were when I put them in the freezer....wrong!! I've used frozen egg whites, and their texture when thawed was like when freshly cracked, so I was expecting the yolks to be the same. Any suggestions or ideas? I just wasn't sure they would work. I was originally going to use them for homemade lemon curd, but the ice cream came up first...

5 replies
lilmissbakesalot Posted 11 Apr 2012 , 3:56am
post #2 of 6

When you freeze yolks you have to add a little salt or sugar to them or they gel up like yours did.

It's a lesson we all learn once... LOL. You can add either add 1/8 tsp salt or 1 1/2 tsp of sugar per 4 yolks.

Hope this helps for next time.

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icer101 Posted 11 Apr 2012 , 4:50am
post #3 of 6

I am so glad i seen this. Just throwed out 12 yolks this week. Mine looked like the first posters did. Now i know . thanks for this info.

vgcea Posted 11 Apr 2012 , 5:05am
post #4 of 6

Yeah that happened to me last week, what a waste. I googled it, something about gelatinization. They suggested adding salt/sugar and mixing up the yolks before freezing.

scp1127 Posted 11 Apr 2012 , 5:47am
post #5 of 6

Slightly off topic, but I saved some yolks to make FBC, one batch made freshly cracked, the others left in a bowl overnight in the refrigerator for the next duplicate order the next day. I do keep the refrigerator very cold.

The second group left overnight worked perfectly until I iced the cake and had maybe a full 25% less voume. If it had not been a rush order on Christmas Eve for a great customer, I would have had to make more. I couldn't put a bottom border on the cake, but it was homestyle. Luckily the customer refused a discount and had a great Christmas bonus for me.

I don't know why my volume changed, but I have never attempted this again. So if volume is important, make sure you have some extra in case this happens to you.

Gerle Posted 12 Apr 2012 , 3:10am
post #6 of 6

Thanks everyone for your comments. I didn't know about the sugar/salt additive, but now that I do, I'll use it next time. Feel bad about wasting all those yolks, but I'll have to chock it up to a learning experience! That's what I love about this site...you learn something new every day from such knowledgable, helpful and friendly people!

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