puddles_gal Posted 9 Apr 2012 , 10:56pm
post #1 of

To make a loooonnnnnnggg story short, I have a client who wants me to make her a cake for sometime in May. I have told her she will need to pay in advance in order to reserve her date, and she is fine with this. So, she was supposed to come last Friday, and did not show up, no call or email or anything. She emailed me later on that night, saying she had to take her son to the hospital b/c he was sick and that's why she didn't come. Whether I believe her is a completely different story, as I have baked for her before and she showed up 2 hours late, no call or email, and claimed she was at a funeral. Anyways, she sent me about 3 emails on the weekend, wanting to come and drop off payment. I told her she could just put it in my mail slot at my house b/c I was busy with Easter festivities all weekend, and she said fine. Sent me an email saying she would drop it off last night. I get home, no money. So she sends me an email this morning, saying she is on her way to drop off the money. I get home from work expecting the envelope to be there, and STILL no money!!!!!!! I am so frustrated with her beyond belief, and no longer feel like I should make her cake b/c this seems like it's some sort of game or something to her. I'm just asking for anyone else's thoughts or opinions on the matter, and how I should tell her that I am no longer willing to make her cake? Thank you in advance!

7 replies
jason_kraft Posted 9 Apr 2012 , 11:03pm
post #2 of

Tell her she needs to deliver the cash within 24 hours or she should consider her order to be cancelled.

heynannie Posted 9 Apr 2012 , 11:44pm
post #3 of

I agree with jason_kraft that is more than fair for her and especially your nerves& blood pressur....don't sweat it <333><

mommachris Posted 10 Apr 2012 , 12:09am
post #4 of

I'm thinking that IF it were me, I'd be inclined to tell her that the date is no longer available,
so I will not be able to make a cake for her event.

She's been given plenty of opportunity to be a faithful client, and this on top of her lateness last time shows a lack of respect for your business.

Just because someone wants us to bake for them, if they are the kind of person that fails to hold up their end of the deal, then then they don't need to be your customer.

Who needs all that drama of half truths and broken promises.
Put the shoe on the other foot for a minute.
If I was supposed to deliver a cake and keep saying I was bringing it but never showed up...she's be pretty mad. icon_smile.gif


mommachris

(edited because for some reason I thought I should put my name twice... icon_rolleyes.gif )

costumeczar Posted 10 Apr 2012 , 12:13am
post #5 of

I'd tell her that you're no longer available for that date, it sounds like she's just going to make you miserable. I'd also tell her that in the future, all orders are not considered orders until payment is received in full three weeks ahead. So she doesn't go on your calendar until she pays you in full at least three weeks ahead of time.

cai0311 Posted 10 Apr 2012 , 1:51am
post #6 of

She has had her chance. I would be afraid she would be hard to deal for the rest of the order. You know she will be late for pick up again.

Apti Posted 10 Apr 2012 , 2:39am
post #7 of

This sounds exactly like your post from Saturday, April 7:
"So frustrated with clients who are late!!!!"
http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&p=7278306&highlight=#7278306

You wrote in the forum mentioned above:
"I definitely think I need to change my policies and get people to pay in advance for their cakes, and then if they are late, either tell them I can't guarantee they will get their cake, or charge a late fee."

You received some excellent advice on that thread, and I'm curious as to why you are still posting about the same problem. Tell her nothing. IF she contacts you again and asks about the cake, tell her politely that she was given multiple opportunities to abide by your payment rules. Unfortunately, you are no longer available to make her cake."

If telling her an absolute NO gives you the willies and makes you want to break out in hives, then perhaps making cakes for money in your community is not your calling. Members of this forum can offer advice, but sometimes it isn't easy to follow or enforce. Good luck with your decision.

scp1127 Posted 10 Apr 2012 , 4:39am
post #8 of

Everyone already gave great advice. I just want to add that you don't need to stress out over these customers. Come up with a plan and tell her that it will be considered a contract when she sends the money, however she gets it there. The date will be open until that time. The end.

If you chase the client, she knows you are available. So what if another client comes along and takes the date. She knows this could happen and is not as concerned as you are.

So when she contacts you, you will either have the date available, need total amount because it is close to the date, or the date is booked. If she still wants the date if it is open, tell her the deadline and don't contact again.

In sales, it's a old saying that it isn't a sale until the contract is signed and the money has been exchanged. Just look at everything as an inquiry until it changes to a sale. Or, don't spend the money until the sale is closed. (Another sales proverb.)

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