lcressel Posted 4 Apr 2012 , 2:48am
post #1 of

Hello All,

I have recently had two occasions where I iced my cakes in buttercream and a few minutes later the buttercream had seperated from the cakes. One was a ruffle cake and the other was just a plain buttercream iced cake.

Any idea on what happened or what I need to do differently?

TIA

8 replies
countrygal7782 Posted 4 Apr 2012 , 3:07am
post #2 of

Not sure but I had that happen one time and it was because it was to warm in the house. Also if your cake was warm that would cause it to melt and slide off. You migh also be getting an air pocket behind the icing?
Hope this helps.

lcressel Posted 4 Apr 2012 , 4:03am
post #3 of

Thank you. I will keep that in mind for my next cake.

GeorgiaC Posted 16 Apr 2012 , 10:05pm
post #4 of

I read somewhere that make sure you have a damp crumb coat. If it has dried, the ruffles tend to slide off.

kakeladi Posted 16 Apr 2012 , 11:22pm
post #5 of

The consistency of the icing in very important. It sounds like the consistency is too stiff. Yes, it could also be that it is hot - either the cake or the room - when working on the cake.

Apti Posted 17 Apr 2012 , 1:28am
post #6 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by kakeladi

The consistency of the icing in very important. It sounds like the consistency is too stiff. Yes, it could also be that it is hot - either the cake or the room - when working on the cake.




Ditto. Frosting consistency is VERY important. If it is too stiff, it won't "stick" to the cake. If it is too thin, it will slide or droop. (Isn't "droop" a cool word! It's even fun to say. But it's not cool when it happens to frosting....)

lcressel Posted 17 Apr 2012 , 2:07am
post #7 of

Thank you. I am trying out new buttercream recipes this week and will try adjusting the liquids to fit the consistency.

texanlostlover Posted 17 Apr 2012 , 2:56am
post #8 of

I've also had that happen before. For me it seemed to be because my cake was a bit too moist, the icing just kind of slid right down the sides. I had let the cake settle overnight wrapped in Saran wrap, and it was almost like the cake was damp when I tried to ice it. I scraped it all off, let the cake sit unwrapped for a couple of hours, and when I tried it again it frosted just fine.

texanlostlover Posted 17 Apr 2012 , 2:58am
post #9 of

I should also note that the same batch of frosting that came off the overly moist cake had been used to frost another cake that was not as moist, and it worked fine on that one. So for me at least, it wasnt a problem with the frosting.

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