Hi-Ratio Shortening

Decorating By Jeffiner5825 Updated 11 May 2012 , 11:19pm by Merry2go

Jeffiner5825 Posted 1 Apr 2012 , 12:47am
post #1 of 22

I have a few questions about Hi-Ratio Shortening. What is the difference between that and regular shortening? Where is a good place to buy it? I am sure that it will need to be purchased online, as shopping is limited for me and the closest opportunity is about 6 hrs away. Thanks for any advice!! icon_smile.gif

21 replies
jeartist Posted 1 Apr 2012 , 12:55am
post #2 of 22

I bake mainly for friends/family so I don't have huge experience. Just purchased some of the hi ratio shortening at a cake supply store. Buttercream has a creamier consistency. The results are just beautiful. Very happy with it, but costly compared.

karukaru Posted 1 Apr 2012 , 12:57am
post #3 of 22

Bump

karukaru Posted 1 Apr 2012 , 12:59am
post #4 of 22

Bump

Wildgirl Posted 1 Apr 2012 , 3:29am
post #5 of 22

I checked at a restaurant supply store, but they didn't have it. I didn't think to check at a cake supply store though - none of these stores are particularly close to me either though, so I would probably just go with Amazon.

sweettreat101 Posted 1 Apr 2012 , 4:17am
post #6 of 22

I used to love using Hi ratio but you can't get it here in CA anymore. Our cake supply stores carry trans fat free icing shortening and so far it works great. Whips nice and fluffy, stable and trans fat free. http://www.thebakerskitchen.net/high-ratio-icing-shortening.aspx

Gerle Posted 1 Apr 2012 , 4:42am
post #7 of 22

Sweettreat101, I don't know where in California you're located, but I just found out that the cake supply store near me does sell hi-ratio with trans fat. I can't remember the details of how they're able to do it, but they did clear it through the necessary legal channels. I just bought some a week or so ago. They actually carry hi-ratio with and without trans fat -- you can make your choice. I like it better than Crisco for buttercream. Kinda pricey, but worth it in the long run.

Spooky_789 Posted 1 Apr 2012 , 5:44am
post #8 of 22

I'm able to get HRS through my husband's restaurant distributors in a 50# box. Price equals about $1.18 per pound. Love using it, makes BC so much better and stable. Even use it for cookies and other things that call for shortening.

jason_kraft Posted 1 Apr 2012 , 3:59pm
post #9 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerle

Sweettreat101, I don't know where in California you're located, but I just found out that the cake supply store near me does sell hi-ratio with trans fat.



Same here in OC...we found small blocks of Sweetex with trans-fat for sale at ABC Cake Decorating Supply in Orange.

FYI hi ratio shortening without trans fat is still hi ratio.

Jeffiner5825 Posted 10 May 2012 , 3:30pm
post #10 of 22

Thank you everyone for your help. I will check into some local resturant supply businesses around here! icon_smile.gif

grandmomof1 Posted 10 May 2012 , 6:55pm
post #11 of 22

There is a Walmart brand that is hi-ratio, works wonderfully for me.

martvrnc35 Posted 10 May 2012 , 8:15pm
post #12 of 22

what is the name of it? I will love to get it. thanks (walmart brand)

grandmomof1 Posted 10 May 2012 , 10:22pm
post #13 of 22

Great Value Shortening. That's all it has on it. When I switched from Crisco to this I could tell a big difference. I told a friend of mine who also bakes about it. She tried it and she loved it.

CarolLee Posted 10 May 2012 , 10:32pm
post #14 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by grandmomof1

Great Value Shortening. That's all it has on it. When I switched from Crisco to this I could tell a big difference. I told a friend of mine who also bakes about it. She tried it and she loved it.




Does it just say Great Value Shortening?? Or is the Great Value Vegetable Shortening? Regular shortening has meat fats!! YUCK!!!

Formynana Posted 10 May 2012 , 10:49pm
post #15 of 22

Walmart has Great value All Vegetable shortening and the other, just make sure you look at the labels because the containers look alike. It does work great ! We have a cash & carry store also in a near by town that does carry hi-ratio has to be purchased though in bulk.

jason_kraft Posted 10 May 2012 , 10:50pm
post #16 of 22

The GV shortening may perform better than Crisco but I doubt it compares to real hi-ratio shortening like Sweetex.

sweettreat101 Posted 11 May 2012 , 8:00am
post #17 of 22

Walmart Great Value is not Hi ratio. It does contain trans fat but it doesn't have the emulsifiers that a real Hi ratio shortening has. Jason my cake supply store up here in Sacramento said she can't order Hi ratio with trans fat anymore. She said once her supply runs out that's it. The transfat free icing shortening that she sells seem to work just as well though. She said that CA is banning trans fat so who knows just one more thing we can't buy here.

jason_kraft Posted 11 May 2012 , 1:54pm
post #18 of 22

Trans fat has been banned in CA for a few years now, but you can still buy Sweetex Z, which is high ratio shortening with zero trans fat. It works similarly to Sweetex but is more temperature sensitive.

Baker_Rose Posted 11 May 2012 , 2:24pm
post #19 of 22

In my area (PA) I can now buy 3# of high-ratio at the cake shop for $2 less than 3# of Crisco! Go figure.

And no, Great Value Veg. Shortening at Wal-Mart is regular shortening, NOT high-ratio.

High ratio can emulsify with liquids and can take a LOT of liquid in your buttercream recipe before breaking down like regular shortening.

Regular shortening creams air.

High-ratio creams liquid and air.

Merry2go Posted 11 May 2012 , 10:34pm
post #20 of 22

So HRS is just shortening that still uses trans fats?

jason_kraft Posted 11 May 2012 , 10:43pm
post #21 of 22

High ratio shortening contains microemulsifying agents and is specifically formulated to absorb more sugar (for recipes with a high ratio of sugar to flour) and liquid ingredients than regular shortening. This helps keep the cake moist and results in a smoother texture.

If it doesn't say high ratio then it's not high ratio shortening.

All high ratio shortening (and all regular shortening too) contains trans fats in some form...Monoglycerides and diglycerides are often used as microemulsifiers and do not have to be reported as trans fats, even though they contain trans-fatty acids. Only the trans fat content of lipids like triglycerides need to be included on the label, trans fats in emulsifiers do not have to be reported.

Merry2go Posted 11 May 2012 , 11:19pm
post #22 of 22

Thanks Jason. You always have the answers.

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