How Do I Sub Ap Flour For Cake Flour?

Baking By LoriMc Updated 31 Mar 2012 , 5:04pm by LoriMc

LoriMc Posted 30 Mar 2012 , 9:41pm
post #1 of 10

I've seen different equations for it on google search. Anyone have a fail proof formula?

Does it alter the taste or texture? I've never done this before, so I'm a little worried. I would love to get away from buying cake flour, as it is so expensive!

9 replies
Goreti Posted 30 Mar 2012 , 9:57pm
post #2 of 10

http://joythebaker.com/2009/09/how-to-make-cake-flour/

I have used this in the past when I ran out of cake flour.

LoriMc Posted 30 Mar 2012 , 10:19pm
post #3 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goreti

http://joythebaker.com/2009/09/how-to-make-cake-flour/

I have used this in the past when I ran out of cake flour.




And could you tell any difference?

Goreti Posted 31 Mar 2012 , 1:48am
post #4 of 10

I really didn't see a difference.

costumeczar Posted 31 Mar 2012 , 2:16am
post #5 of 10

All you need to do is take out 2 Tbsp of AP flour per cup, you don't need to add the corn starch.

But it does make a difference, even slightly. Cake flour and other types fo flour are made from different types of wheats with different protein contents. the cake flour has less protein, so it creates less gluten, which makes a softer product. Removing the 2 Tbsp reduced the overall amount of protein, so that's why the substitution works. You'll get a better cake if you do use the cake flour, though. If you can't tell the difference and you like the result, though, who cares? Go ahead and substitute away.

LoriMc Posted 31 Mar 2012 , 2:41am
post #6 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

All you need to do is take out 2 Tbsp of AP flour per cup, you don't need to add the corn starch.

But it does make a difference, even slightly. Cake flour and other types fo flour are made from different types of wheats with different protein contents. the cake flour has less protein, so it creates less gluten, which makes a softer product. Removing the 2 Tbsp reduced the overall amount of protein, so that's why the substitution works. You'll get a better cake if you do use the cake flour, though. If you can't tell the difference and you like the result, though, who cares? Go ahead and substitute away.




Ugh! I just wish cake flour wasn't so expensive. Maybe I will try half and half and see how that goes.

The AP Flour I use is White Lily. I don't know if you are familiar with it, but it's a winter wheat grown in the south (which is supposed to be softer, less gluten and less protein) . On the package it says to add 2 Tb of flour to every cup in the recipe. This would make it an even exchange. How interesting. We will see how it goes.

Thanks for the replies!

costumeczar Posted 31 Mar 2012 , 2:11pm
post #7 of 10

Is it White Lily Ap flour specifically, or jsut White Lily? When I moved to Virginia I couldn't find Swans Down flour (I since have, that's what I use) so I used White Lily and I could tell a difference, I called the White Lily people and asked them what the protein content was, and they said it was 8-9%. So that maked it pastry flour, not AP flour. Cake flour is 6% protein, AP flour is about 11%, and bread flour is around 13%.

So if you're just using the regular White Lily, I'd just take out 1 Tbsp per cup and that should be fine. Pastry flour is specifically for making things like biscuits and croissants, that kind of stuff, not quite bread not quite cake. It's softer than an AP flour but not as soft as cake flour, but it's closer to the cake protein content.

LoriMc Posted 31 Mar 2012 , 2:50pm
post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

Is it White Lily Ap flour specifically, or jsut White Lily? When I moved to Virginia I couldn't find Swans Down flour (I since have, that's what I use) so I used White Lily and I could tell a difference, I called the White Lily people and asked them what the protein content was, and they said it was 8-9%. So that maked it pastry flour, not AP flour. Cake flour is 6% protein, AP flour is about 11%, and bread flour is around 13%.

So if you're just using the regular White Lily, I'd just take out 1 Tbsp per cup and that should be fine. Pastry flour is specifically for making things like biscuits and croissants, that kind of stuff, not quite bread not quite cake. It's softer than an AP flour but not as soft as cake flour, but it's closer to the cake protein content.




It is White Lily AP Baking Flour. It's the standard flour I use for everything I bake like some cakes, cookies, biscuits etc. It is 8% protein. I think I am going to try mixing them 1:1. That should put me at about 7% protein. I'll let you know how it goes!

costumeczar Posted 31 Mar 2012 , 4:25pm
post #9 of 10

And I just realized that I wrote "maked it" instead of "made it." I swear I'm not a 4 yr-old, I just can't type. icon_razz.gif

LoriMc Posted 31 Mar 2012 , 5:04pm
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

And I just realized that I wrote "maked it" instead of "made it." I swear I'm not a 4 yr-old, I just can't type. icon_razz.gif




Ha ha ha...that's ok. I baked the cakes and put some extra in cupcakes. Tasted one and it was great! Scratch cakes never bake high enough for my taste, but I got the same exact result as I got with the Swan's Down. Thanks for the advice!

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