Tips For A Newbie?

Decorating By karenina44 Updated 28 Mar 2012 , 4:51pm by Apti

karenina44 Posted 27 Mar 2012 , 1:18am
post #1 of 8

I'm very new to making cakes, and recently tried my first fondant cake. What texture should I be aiming for in the cake batter? How do I get a nice, flat top? Is marshmallow fondant a faux pas?

Any tips for a beginner that you know now and wish you knew then?

Thanks icon_biggrin.gif

7 replies
Ashleyssweetdesigns Posted 27 Mar 2012 , 1:36am
post #2 of 8

Never tried marshmallow fondant but I know lots of ccers use it. I prefer satin ice fondant bc u can roll it super thin without it breaking or tearing. As far as cake batter a few tips I can offer is one make sure all ur ingredients are at room temperature and two never over mix your batter. "the cake bible" is a great book and third practice practice practice!!! Hope that helps! I'm sure u'll get lots of other great advice. Also read through the threads in the forums. I've learned so much just from reading other peoples post.

AnnieCahill Posted 27 Mar 2012 , 1:40am
post #3 of 8

Texture of batter or texture of finished cake? Both of those will depend on the recipe and your desired outcome. Me personally, I like a dense cake with a fine textured crumb-close to a pound cake but not as buttery, if that makes sense. The ideal texture will depend on the baker and the type of recipe.

To get a flat top, use the bake even strips. You can purchase these at Michael's. They look like silver fabric strips that you soak and then pin around the cake. They help the outside not bake as quickly as the inside. You can also use an inverted flower nail in the center of the cake batter (I do this for larger cakes). This will act as a heating core and help the cake bake better in the center.

As far as MMF, no it's not a faux pas. Many people use it successfully. I am personally not a fondant decorator but I have seen a lot of beautiful cakes done with MMF.

annie

Apti Posted 27 Mar 2012 , 2:55am
post #4 of 8

Here is a compilation of all the stuff I know NOW that I wished I'd known then... It should provide all the information you need:

http://www.wilton.com/forums/messageview.cfm?catid=8&threadid=160184

Happy Baking!

karenina44 Posted 27 Mar 2012 , 9:17pm
post #5 of 8

thank you so much for great tips!

jgifford Posted 27 Mar 2012 , 9:32pm
post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apti

Here is a compilation of all the stuff I know NOW that I wished I'd known then... It should provide all the information you need:

http://www.wilton.com/forums/messageview.cfm?catid=8&threadid=160184

Happy Baking!




Wow - I can't wait to go thru this and I've been baking a day or two! icon_rolleyes.gif

RebeccaBloomwood Posted 28 Mar 2012 , 5:17am
post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apti

Here is a compilation of all the stuff I know NOW that I wished I'd known then... It should provide all the information you need:

http://www.wilton.com/forums/messageview.cfm?catid=8&threadid=160184

Happy Baking!




wow thanks for this!! icon_biggrin.gifthumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gif

Apti Posted 28 Mar 2012 , 4:51pm
post #8 of 8

RebeccaBloomwood and jGifford~~ You are both very welcome.

I started two years ago with a Wilton class at Michaels and ZERO knowledge of anything cake. (I thought you made cakes in a Walmart sheet cake pan with cake mix and canned frosting, then swirled the canned frosting with a butter knife.)

CakeCentral.com, Wilton.com, youtube and Google searches gave me such an amazing wealth of freely shared information from experts. I am still awed by the generosity and talent shared by other cakers.

Since I was SO new at all of this, I ended up writing out step-by-step instructions of all the stuff it took me 100's of hours to learn/research. This is a compliation of all that stuff. I wanted to "give back" to all the other newbie bakers.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

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