debidehm Posted 15 Mar 2012 , 2:32am
post #1 of

Someone I know wants to put real Stargazer Lilies on her cake, and I have concerns I thought I would ask the knowledgeable people here about. Are they even safe to put on a cake?

11 replies
step0nmi Posted 15 Mar 2012 , 2:47am
post #2 of

you can always wrap the ends with floral tape to help it...they don't have to actually stick into the cake

debidehm Posted 15 Mar 2012 , 3:02am
post #3 of

I know about that, but also have read that they shouldn't even touch the cake. Thoughts?

step0nmi Posted 15 Mar 2012 , 3:06am
post #4 of

how many are you putting on the cake? where are you putting them? i'm sure there are things like floral holders that you can put them in before they go on the cake. i'm not that familiar with real flowers on a cake...you can always look around at the craft store in the floral section

icer101 Posted 15 Mar 2012 , 3:31am
post #5 of

HI, i googled and found this. This article is saying you can. hth


http://www.beach-wedding-themes.com/hawaiian-wedding-theme.html

Annabakescakes Posted 15 Mar 2012 , 5:43am
post #6 of

I wouldn't put them anywhere near a cake! All lilies are Poisonous. Just google poisonous flowers and it will be on the list.

sweettreat101 Posted 16 Mar 2012 , 1:02am
post #7 of

I would never use real stargazers on cakes. Even if you wrap the stems the centers have pollens. I have a lady that loves stargazers so I tell her she has to use gum paste flowers or artificial that I won't take the chance of making someone sick.

ladij153 Posted 16 Mar 2012 , 1:28am
post #8 of

Found this on Wikipedia: Lilium "Stargazer" (the Stargazer lily) is a hybrid lily of the Oriental group. Oriental lilies are known for their fragrant perfume, blooming mid-to-late summer. Stargazers are easy to grow and do best in full sunlight.[1] They have a fast growth rate and should be planted in full sun in well drained loamy or sandy soil. When mature, Stargazers can grow to a height of 36 inches with a spread of 12 to 16 inches with 4 to 5 flowers per stem.

Stargazer lily
The Stargazer lily was created in 1978 by Leslie Woodriff,[2] a lily breeder in California. Woodriff called the new cross "Stargazer," because the blooms faced towards the sky. Known for its striking white, red, and pink petals, and heavenly scent, this lily has become a favorite for many occasions.[3]

The ASPCA reports this plant as being toxic to cats. They are said to cause vomiting, inappetence, lethargy, kidney failure, and even death. Cats are the only species known to be affected.[4]

Here is the link if you want to look further http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lilium_%22Stargazer%22

sweettreat101 Posted 16 Mar 2012 , 8:26am
post #9 of

Contacted poison control. This is what they said. Stargazer lillies are mildly toxic which could cause sore mouth and upset stomach symptoms would show within 4 hours. Do you really want to take the chance. It might not kill someone but they could still end up with flu like symptoms. I'm not willing to take the risk but everyone has the right to make their own decisions.

step0nmi Posted 16 Mar 2012 , 4:13pm

your only options are gumpaste or silk! sometimes you just have to educate the person you are giving the cake to.

debidehm Posted 16 Mar 2012 , 6:04pm

Thank you all for the information. I'm not personally making the cake, a friend is. It's for a wedding cake her cousin wants, and wants it EXACTLY like the picture she sent my friend. When my friend showed me the picture, I told her I thought lilies were poisonous, but that I would get back to her. I looked up article after article on the subject, but wanted to know what other cake designers thought about the subject. Me personally, I would do silk or gum paste...but that's her call! Again, thanks so much for the help. icon_smile.gif

southerncross Posted 16 Mar 2012 , 7:25pm

I had a bride request stargazer lilies on her cake last year. She provided a picture and when you looked closely, it wasn't a real stargazer lily but rather a well crafted sugar paste one. It made sense because real stargazers are quite large and may be out of proportion to the cake. Secondly, unless you can guarantee that the lily is pesticide free and each one at the florist is sprayed (trust me, my cousin is in the wholesale flower business for 40 years) you run a risk of pesticide transfer to your cake.
I counseled my bride to the sugar paste lily (it was surprisingly easy to make and ready made ones are readily available) She kept it under a glass dome after the wedding and put it on the anniversary cake a year later.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%