Wrap Cake Or Wrap Box?, Freezing Decorated Cake

Decorating By nderin04 Updated 8 Mar 2012 , 8:12pm by CWR41

nderin04 Posted 8 Mar 2012 , 1:20pm
post #1 of 7

I know there are a lot of cake freezing posts (I've read 'em all!) and I'm still a little confused. I'm freezing a decorated cake for use a week later. Unfortunately, I won't be there at the end point to be doing the unwrapping.

So I have a few questions,

1) should I wrap the cake directly w/ the plastic wrap/foil combo, where the wrap would touch the icing?
1a) if so, at what point in the thawing process do I take the wrapping off? (I've got to leave specific instructions because I won't be there doing the unwrapping)

2) or, should I put the cake in a box and wrap the box well? (seems like the easiest solution for the person who needs to thaw the cake).

Thanks so much for your advice/wisdom/baking addictions icon_smile.gif

6 replies
scp1127 Posted 8 Mar 2012 , 1:25pm
post #2 of 7

You can do both. If the cake can be wrapped, ok. But many times this just won't work without hurting your decorations.

In either case, box or cake, wrap tightly so that no air can get to it. To thaw, thaw completely with the plastic on. Then unwrap.

CWR41 Posted 8 Mar 2012 , 2:37pm
post #3 of 7

It depends on if it's a fondant or buttercream cake. Since you're only freezing it for a week, I'd just freeze it in a box or a plastic clamshell.

If you were freezing a buttercream cake for more than a week, I'd pop it in the freezer for a couple hours until frozen solid so the decorations won't get smashed from the wrap, wrap well after frozen, then box for protection if necessary. The plastic wrap needs to be removed before it thaws to prevent ruining the decorations and/or the icing from being removed along with the wrap.

If freezing a fondant cake for more than a week, I'd box the cake and wrap the box so it can thaw undisturbed in the wrapped box to prevent condensation.

BlakesCakes Posted 8 Mar 2012 , 7:42pm
post #4 of 7

Can't think of a single good reason to put the wrapping anywhere near the decorated cake. It's a risk not worth taking.

If you've read all of my posts about this....and I post almost weekly in response to the question....then the order is this:

Cake Freezing & Defrosting Instructions

Place completely wrapped box in freezerlevel with nothing on top of box.
24 hrs. before serving, place completely wrapped box in refrigerator.
2-6 hours before serving, place completely wrapped box on counter (so cake can come to room temp while still wrapped).
Right before display, carefully cut away wrappings while keeping box flat & level. Remove cake from box.
  
Follow these directions to a T. If the cake is exposed to room air while very cold, it will sweat and dark colored decorations or icing may then bleed.

Store leftovers, covered, in the refrigerator for up to 5 days or in the freezer for up to 1 month.
Cake texture and flavor will be optimal when the cake is at room temperature.

Rae

CWR41 Posted 8 Mar 2012 , 7:57pm
post #5 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakesCakes

Can't think of a single good reason to put the wrapping anywhere near the decorated cake.




On 1st anniversary cakes that are frozen for a year.

If unwrapped and placed in a box, it will most definitely be freezer burned before the anniversary. It must be wrapped as air tight as possible, if you expect it to be edible a year later.

BlakesCakes Posted 8 Mar 2012 , 8:00pm
post #6 of 7

Sorry. Disagree. If box is airtight, ergo, wrapped properly, cake will be fine. Been there, done that.
Rae

CWR41 Posted 8 Mar 2012 , 8:12pm
post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakesCakes

Sorry. Disagree. If box is airtight, ergo, wrapped properly, cake will be fine. Been there, done that.
Rae




Sure it will, within six month expiration dates... decorated cakes are boxed, frozen, shipped, and stored this way by manufacturers all the time, but no way for a year without being wrapped airtight.

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