leasey Posted 6 Mar 2012 , 3:52am
post #1 of

Hi, Im negotiating to rent a kitchen 1 day a month for a few hours. The just emailed me that she is requiring I get renters insurance? Is that normal? I wont have any valuables at the kitchen. Thanks for your input.
Lisa

11 replies
NatalieC923 Posted 6 Mar 2012 , 4:06am
post #2 of

I have to carry comprehensive public liability insurance, covering me and the landlord, from loss by accident on or near the premises for $1,000,000 for bodily injury; $50,000 for property damage; and $1,000,000 Product Liability covering products made on the premises.

leasey Posted 6 Mar 2012 , 4:22pm
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thanks, thats good to know. Im clueless about this stuff!

KoryAK Posted 6 Mar 2012 , 6:12pm
post #4 of

Yeah, I don't think renters insurance is the right title (that's more for when you rent an apartment) but there are definitely other insurances that you will need. Just contact your regular agent and see what they have to say on it.

leasey Posted 6 Mar 2012 , 7:37pm
post #5 of

Your right. its liability insurance that includes the rental.

auzzi Posted 9 Mar 2012 , 9:20am
post #6 of

Renter's Insurance is the insurance that a landlord takes out against the possibility of a tenant doing a midnight-flit without paying rent up to date, the cost of any repairs due to tenants abuse, and the general maintenance due to their unscheduled departure ..

costumeczar Posted 9 Mar 2012 , 4:58pm
post #7 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by auzzi

Renter's Insurance is the insurance that a landlord takes out against the possibility of a tenant doing a midnight-flit without paying rent up to date, the cost of any repairs due to tenants abuse, and the general maintenance due to their unscheduled departure ..




Interesting, in the US it's insurance that the renter himself has to take out because the landlord's insurance doesn't cover tenants for personal loss if the place burns down or gets robbed. We used to rent apartments in the house we owned, and the tenants wouldn't have been covered under our homeowner's insurance if their apartment was robbed unless they had their own insurance.

CWR41 Posted 9 Mar 2012 , 5:14pm
post #8 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

Interesting, in the US it's insurance that the renter himself has to take out because the landlord's insurance doesn't cover tenants for personal loss if the place burns down or gets robbed. We used to rent apartments in the house we owned, and the tenants wouldn't have been covered under our homeowner's insurance if their apartment was robbed unless they had their own insurance.




Exactly. It covers the contents belonging to the renter.

Toodee Posted 12 Mar 2012 , 12:02am
post #9 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by auzzi

Renter's Insurance is the insurance that a landlord takes out against the possibility of a tenant doing a midnight-flit without paying rent up to date, the cost of any repairs due to tenants abuse, and the general maintenance due to their unscheduled departure ..




Actually that's Landlord's Insurance.

KoryAK Posted 12 Mar 2012 , 3:10am
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toodee

Quote:
Originally Posted by auzzi

Renter's Insurance is the insurance that a landlord takes out against the possibility of a tenant doing a midnight-flit without paying rent up to date, the cost of any repairs due to tenants abuse, and the general maintenance due to their unscheduled departure ..



Actually that's Landlord's Insurance.




Auzzi is from Australia - it might be titles differently down there.

Toodee Posted 12 Mar 2012 , 3:23am
Quote:
Originally Posted by KoryAK

Quote:
Originally Posted by Toodee

Quote:
Originally Posted by auzzi

Renter's Insurance is the insurance that a landlord takes out against the possibility of a tenant doing a midnight-flit without paying rent up to date, the cost of any repairs due to tenants abuse, and the general maintenance due to their unscheduled departure ..



Actually that's Landlord's Insurance.



Auzzi is from Australia - it might be titles differently down there.




So am I.

auzzi Posted 12 Mar 2012 , 7:53am

Landlord's or Renter's .. depends on the state ..

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