pammylynn Posted 1 Mar 2012 , 5:47am
post #1 of

Just need some ideas. First wedding cake I made, stacking was a failure had to regroup and put each tier on a clear glass vase. Didn't have time to figure it out. Second wedding cake I was afraid and just used a small cupcake/cake stand (3 tiers)....small wedding, bride didn't care at all. Third wedding was my daughters.....still learning, just had the bottom plastic board supports from Hobby Lobby. My daughter could have cared less.

THIS time - it's for my daughter's friend. Still not a high-pressure-gotta-be-perfect-client. But, I'm learning and trying to improve with each cake I make and want this one to look as nice and professional as sad little me can get it. Ha!!

It's a 6, 8, 10, 12 tiered cake. I want the bottom tier to be flat on a plywood pedestal my hubby made (trying to simulate the bride's photo example). I'm going to drape a satin piece of material over the plywood. I want the bottom tier setting on an off-white "something." What should I cover that bottom foam board/cake board with? I've seen royal icing used. Fondant used. The cake is going to be covered in the homemade decorator icing (without milk) because the bride and groom have had bday cakes I've made and that's what they want. It's not a fondant cake. What can I use so that it will still look professional and not be the foam board sitting on the beautiful satin material?? LOL

Thanks in advance for any thoughts to help this newbie!! (Besides, I have another family wedding cake to make the last weekend in March - gotta try to get better and improve more for THAT one too!!)

19 replies
mcaballero2 Posted 1 Mar 2012 , 7:59am
post #2 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by pammylynn

Just need some ideas. First wedding cake I made, stacking was a failure had to regroup and put each tier on a clear glass vase. Didn't have time to figure it out. Second wedding cake I was afraid and just used a small cupcake/cake stand (3 tiers)....small wedding, bride didn't care at all. Third wedding was my daughters.....still learning, just had the bottom plastic board supports from Hobby Lobby. My daughter could have cared less.

THIS time - it's for my daughter's friend. Still not a high-pressure-gotta-be-perfect-client. But, I'm learning and trying to improve with each cake I make and want this one to look as nice and professional as sad little me can get it. Ha!!

It's a 6, 8, 10, 12 tiered cake. I want the bottom tier to be flat on a plywood pedestal my hubby made (trying to simulate the bride's photo example). I'm going to drape a satin piece of material over the plywood. I want the bottom tier setting on an off-white "something." What should I cover that bottom foam board/cake board with? I've seen royal icing used. Fondant used. The cake is going to be covered in the homemade decorator icing (without milk) because the bride and groom have had bday cakes I've made and that's what they want. It's not a fondant cake. What can I use so that it will still look professional and not be the foam board sitting on the beautiful satin material?? LOL

Thanks in advance for any thoughts to help this newbie!! (Besides, I have another family wedding cake to make the last weekend in March - gotta try to get better and improve more for THAT one too!!)




To answer you're question, since it's not a fondant cake, I would use royal icing. To get it smooth, ice the board, then drag a clean and sterile sharp edge like a ruler across it while the icing is still wet. If you don't get it smooth the first time, clean the sharp edge and try again until you get the look you're looking for.

As far as the stacking goes, there's a great video on youtube by Edna de la Cruz that's very helpful.

Wish you all the best!

pammylynn Posted 1 Mar 2012 , 7:57pm
post #3 of

I just watched her video. So helpful! Thank you!!

I'm curious about something. As the cake is cut and the layers are removed. Is it normal for the top of the previous layer to be missing some icing? Will it stick to the board above it? I honestly can't remember what happened with my daughter's cake as we had other cutting it. Do I have it right in my head that if the dowels are the right height and supporting the cake, then all the icing won't stick to the bottom of the layer above it?

Some day this will all make sense... icon_confused.gif

Texas_Rose Posted 1 Mar 2012 , 8:15pm
post #4 of

Sometimes the icing will stick. I cover my boards with press and seal wrap and that helps keep them from sticking.

About the bottom board, I would cover it with fondant even though the cake isnt' going to have fondant...but that's probably just because I don't like making royal icing icon_biggrin.gif

mom2twogrlz Posted 1 Mar 2012 , 9:16pm
post #5 of

I cover my boards in fabric, using modge podge glue to seal it from the cake.

chelleb1974 Posted 2 Mar 2012 , 8:05pm
post #6 of

I'd cover the board in fondant, but I have never iced a board in royal icing before. I have put a thin layer of coconut between the cake and plastic plate/board that is sitting on it to avoid the icing sticking to the board. I'm sure there are other items you could use also.

~Chelle

MamaDear Posted 2 Mar 2012 , 9:17pm
post #7 of

I am by no means traditional or am I professional but I have found the best way for me to go is by buying a glass cutting board for retangular or very large round cakes OR using a round glass platter (the "plate" in a microwave, bought at a tag or garage sale works well because the glass is thicker) for my buttercream cakes.

My Alabama cake is done on a glass cutting board ($12-15 at Wal-Mart), its not really visible due to the chocolate strawberries and decorations but it looked nice and the board was given to the happy couple as a gift (it was a gift cake). My speakerbox cake, Skittles and Pink Sophie is One cake were done on a poly (white) cutting board ($12-15 at Wal-Mart) because they were so heavy and I personally don't like the plywood option because its stuck together with so many chemicals that are bad for you.

Several of my cakes were done on acrylic platters that I bought for a $1 on clearance or pizza pans because they are sturdier than the old Wilton boards and cost roughly the same. I do love the new silver Wilton Boards because they are nicer to look at and thicker but I don't trust them and always transport my cakes on a really thick pizza pan with the shelf foamy stuff between the board and pan.

I like the cutting board for cakes because it keeps the buttercream off of the tablecloth (no greasy spots) and gives me a little room to cut the cake without getting it everywhere. I know it adds a little to the cost of caking but I have used the same white cutting board for at least four or five years and you can't re-use the cardboard ones.

Hope that helps.

mcaballero2 Posted 2 Mar 2012 , 9:20pm
post #8 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by pammylynn

I just watched her video. So helpful! Thank you!!

I'm curious about something. As the cake is cut and the layers are removed. Is it normal for the top of the previous layer to be missing some icing? Will it stick to the board above it? I honestly can't remember what happened with my daughter's cake as we had other cutting it. Do I have it right in my head that if the dowels are the right height and supporting the cake, then all the icing won't stick to the bottom of the layer above it?

Some day this will all make sense... icon_confused.gif




The icing will sometimes stick and that can depend on the humidity and recipe of your icing as well as the materials used. You could put a circle of parchment under the cake boards of the upper tiers, stick them on to the bottom (underside) part of the board with royal icing or something similar and that should do the trick.

mcaballero2 Posted 2 Mar 2012 , 9:21pm
post #9 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by pammylynn

I just watched her video. So helpful! Thank you!!

I'm curious about something. As the cake is cut and the layers are removed. Is it normal for the top of the previous layer to be missing some icing? Will it stick to the board above it? I honestly can't remember what happened with my daughter's cake as we had other cutting it. Do I have it right in my head that if the dowels are the right height and supporting the cake, then all the icing won't stick to the bottom of the layer above it?

Some day this will all make sense... icon_confused.gif




The icing will sometimes stick and that can depend on the humidity and recipe of your icing as well as the materials used. You could put a circle of parchment under the cake boards of the upper tiers, stick them on to the bottom (underside) part of the board with royal icing or something similar and that should do the trick.

mcaballero2 Posted 2 Mar 2012 , 9:22pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by pammylynn

I just watched her video. So helpful! Thank you!!

I'm curious about something. As the cake is cut and the layers are removed. Is it normal for the top of the previous layer to be missing some icing? Will it stick to the board above it? I honestly can't remember what happened with my daughter's cake as we had other cutting it. Do I have it right in my head that if the dowels are the right height and supporting the cake, then all the icing won't stick to the bottom of the layer above it?

Some day this will all make sense... icon_confused.gif




The icing will sometimes stick and that can depend on the humidity and recipe of your icing as well as the materials used. You could put a circle of parchment under the cake boards of the upper tiers, stick them on to the bottom (underside) part of the board with royal icing or something similar and that should do the trick.

mcaballero2 Posted 2 Mar 2012 , 9:23pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by pammylynn

I just watched her video. So helpful! Thank you!!

I'm curious about something. As the cake is cut and the layers are removed. Is it normal for the top of the previous layer to be missing some icing? Will it stick to the board above it? I honestly can't remember what happened with my daughter's cake as we had other cutting it. Do I have it right in my head that if the dowels are the right height and supporting the cake, then all the icing won't stick to the bottom of the layer above it?

Some day this will all make sense... icon_confused.gif




The icing will sometimes stick and that can depend on the humidity and recipe of your icing as well as the materials used. You could put a circle of parchment under the cake boards of the upper tiers, stick them on to the bottom (underside) part of the board with royal icing or something similar and that should do the trick.

mcaballero2 Posted 2 Mar 2012 , 9:24pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by pammylynn

I just watched her video. So helpful! Thank you!!

I'm curious about something. As the cake is cut and the layers are removed. Is it normal for the top of the previous layer to be missing some icing? Will it stick to the board above it? I honestly can't remember what happened with my daughter's cake as we had other cutting it. Do I have it right in my head that if the dowels are the right height and supporting the cake, then all the icing won't stick to the bottom of the layer above it?

Some day this will all make sense... icon_confused.gif




The icing will sometimes stick and that can depend on the humidity and recipe of your icing as well as the materials used. You could put a circle of parchment under the cake boards of the upper tiers, stick them on to the bottom (underside) part of the board with royal icing or something similar and that should do the trick.

mcaballero2 Posted 2 Mar 2012 , 9:25pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by pammylynn

I just watched her video. So helpful! Thank you!!

I'm curious about something. As the cake is cut and the layers are removed. Is it normal for the top of the previous layer to be missing some icing? Will it stick to the board above it? I honestly can't remember what happened with my daughter's cake as we had other cutting it. Do I have it right in my head that if the dowels are the right height and supporting the cake, then all the icing won't stick to the bottom of the layer above it?

Some day this will all make sense... icon_confused.gif




The icing will sometimes stick and that can depend on the humidity and recipe of your icing as well as the materials used. You could put a circle of parchment under the cake boards of the upper tiers, stick them on to the bottom (underside) part of the board with royal icing or something similar and that should do the trick.

mcaballero2 Posted 2 Mar 2012 , 9:27pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by pammylynn

I just watched her video. So helpful! Thank you!!

I'm curious about something. As the cake is cut and the layers are removed. Is it normal for the top of the previous layer to be missing some icing? Will it stick to the board above it? I honestly can't remember what happened with my daughter's cake as we had other cutting it. Do I have it right in my head that if the dowels are the right height and supporting the cake, then all the icing won't stick to the bottom of the layer above it?

Some day this will all make sense... icon_confused.gif




The icing will sometimes stick and that can depend on the humidity and recipe of your icing as well as the materials used. You could put a circle of parchment under the cake boards of the upper tiers, stick them on to the bottom (underside) part of the board with royal icing or something similar and that should do the trick.

mcaballero2 Posted 2 Mar 2012 , 9:29pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by pammylynn

I just watched her video. So helpful! Thank you!!

I'm curious about something. As the cake is cut and the layers are removed. Is it normal for the top of the previous layer to be missing some icing? Will it stick to the board above it? I honestly can't remember what happened with my daughter's cake as we had other cutting it. Do I have it right in my head that if the dowels are the right height and supporting the cake, then all the icing won't stick to the bottom of the layer above it?

Some day this will all make sense... icon_confused.gif




The icing will sometimes stick and that can depend on the humidity and recipe of your icing as well as the materials used. You could put a circle of parchment under the cake boards of the upper tiers, stick them on to the bottom (underside) part of the board with royal icing or something similar and that should do the trick.

mcaballero2 Posted 2 Mar 2012 , 9:38pm

Sorry about the extra posts, I think my computer went crazy for a minute. =/

pammylynn Posted 3 Mar 2012 , 5:57am

Thank you everyone! Great ideas! Since time was of the essence this time, I opted to go with the same plastic rounds I was using between layers. I went for the one size bigger to put the 12" tier on, that way there was a border around it. It has little legs, so it is up off the material that I put between it the plywood pedestal. I put a support underneath to help support the cake...

I will definitely go through these ideas again for the wedding I have the last weekend of this month.

All I can do is hope to improve my skills with each attempt...

Thank you all so much...

Bakingangel Posted 3 Mar 2012 , 6:34am

Pam, one of the best stacking videos is by Sharon Zambito, of Sugar Ed Productions. Not that expensive and worth every penny. Good luck!

Bridgette1129 Posted 3 Mar 2012 , 6:44am

[quote="mcaballero2"]

Quote:
Originally Posted by pammylynn



The icing will sometimes stick and that can depend on the humidity and recipe of your icing as well as the materials used. You could put a circle of parchment under the cake boards of the upper tiers, stick them on to the bottom (underside) part of the board with royal icing or something similar and that should do the trick.




On my first 2 tier cake, I did this and the top layer shifted during transportation icon_sad.gif

mcaballero2 Posted 10 Mar 2012 , 8:56am

[quote="Bridgette1129"]

Quote:
Originally Posted by mcaballero2

Quote:
Originally Posted by pammylynn



The icing will sometimes stick and that can depend on the humidity and recipe of your icing as well as the materials used. You could put a circle of parchment under the cake boards of the upper tiers, stick them on to the bottom (underside) part of the board with royal icing or something similar and that should do the trick.



On my first 2 tier cake, I did this and the top layer shifted during transportation icon_sad.gif




Hmm... did you have the two center dowels going through the cake? One on each side should keep the tiers from shifting.

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