Putting In My Box Order......

Baking By cakespender Updated 28 Feb 2012 , 6:35am by scp1127

cakespender Posted 26 Feb 2012 , 3:58pm
post #1 of 14

Okay, I am placing my first box order and don't want to make a newbie mistake by buying a ton of boxes that wont get used as much. I was thinking of getting some singles ( all of these will have inserts too by the way) some half dozen and some dozen. Now I am up in the air about the double or 4 pack ones. If you had to get one of those which would you do? Or would you get them both.
Also what would you recommend for mini's? I am planning on doing a lot of Farmers Markets/ booths at trade fairs locally.
also feel free to share your knowledge/ past mistakes regarding boxes and inserts. I want to learn from you all icon_biggrin.gif

13 replies
sillywabbitz Posted 26 Feb 2012 , 10:59pm
post #2 of 14

Do you have a sales policy on minimum orders? I have a minimum of 1 dozen per flavor so single dozen boxes is what I ordered. Most people will order 2-3 dozen but the cost of buying 20 dozen boxes and 10 2 dozen boxes at brpboxshop was $68. For $75 o
I could buy 100 single dozen boxes so that was a no brainer.

Now for the real world. I'm a small business and most customers are friends so when someone tells me the need 18 cupcakes, I do it because my recipe actually makes 18 not 12 so I wish I had purchased some 1/2 dozen boxes however it's cheaper for me to use a full dozen box at a bulk price than to use the occasional 1/2 dozen box.

For the minis, sell them in the sizes that fix the boxes you purchase. So for me I can buy the mini inserts that hold 24 minis and fit in a single dozen box. Does that make sense?

Cupcations Posted 27 Feb 2012 , 2:50am
post #3 of 14

As the previous poster stated, do you have a minimum order?
My minimum order is 2 dozens per flavor, and I order my containers from
www.wesellcoffee.com
I personally like the 6 pack ones they're easy to carry and to pack
That website also carries plastic hinged containers for minis.
If you live outside of the US, you will be paying customs and other fees as well, make sure you add that to the cost.
Past mistakes: ordering conatiners for $50 and then paying $40 for customs thumbsdown.gif Yes that's a bummer! Lol

HTH

cakespender Posted 27 Feb 2012 , 5:16am
post #4 of 14

thanks guys, I have shopped around and BRP has the best prices in Canada that I could find. I kind of wanted to stay away from the plastic hinged, even though they are soooo much cheaper I find the window boxes to be more classy. I will follow your input, thank you so much for replying!!!!
I hadn't thought of a minimum order. What if a mom has a bday party and only need a dozen, how can I say "sorry, you need to order 2 dozen" isn't that a reason to push business away? Please, as a new cupcake business explain the minimum order reasoning thumbs_up.gif

sillywabbitz Posted 27 Feb 2012 , 5:28am
post #5 of 14

It's hard when you're first starting out to set things like minimums because every order is important but you need to think about your time,cost and overhead. Take 1 dozen cupcakes for example. Let's say you charge $24 a dozen. First depending on your recipe, most make 24 cupcakes so you either have to 1/2 the recipe or freeze the extra. Second, by the time you mix batter, make buttercream, bake, cool and decorate, plus clean up...I'd estimate you're looking at 2 hrs worth of work. Subtract out the cost of ingredients, supplies boxes, cupcake liners, electricity,gas money etc and you're probably barely making minimum wage.

Now take that same order and make it two dozen. Since the recipe makes 24 cupcakes the mixing time, buttercream making and baking/cooling time is all the same. The decorating time increase but honestly a 1M swirl and a sprinkles on 12 cupcakes takes me less than 10 minutes. So basically in the same amount of time, I almost double my hourly wage. Yes I have the extra cost of liners and another box but that's probably about $2. So setting a minimum is more efficient use of my time.

A lot of people set a minimum price per order instead of a min number. For example, i think it's Indydebi who won't turn on her oven for less than $50. If that's 12 cupcakes at $5 a cupcake or small 6 inch cake it doesn't matter. The point is her time with her family and her personal life is worth more to her than $24 on a small order.

I hope that makes sense.

Cupcations Posted 27 Feb 2012 , 5:38am
post #6 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by sillywabbitz

It's hard when you're first starting out to set things like minimums because every order is important but you need to think about your time,cost and overhead. Take 1 dozen cupcakes for example. Let's say you charge $24 a dozen. First depending on your recipe, most make 24 cupcakes so you either have to 1/2 the recipe or freeze the extra. Second, by the time you mix batter, make buttercream, bake, cool and decorate, plus clean up...I'd estimate you're looking at 2 hrs worth of work. Subtract out the cost of ingredients, supplies boxes, cupcake liners, electricity,gas money etc and you're probably barely making minimum wage.

Now take that same order and make it two dozen. Since the recipe makes 24 cupcakes the mixing time, buttercream making and baking/cooling time is all the same. The decorating time increase but honestly a 1M swirl and a sprinkles on 12 cupcakes takes me less than 10 minutes. So basically in the same amount of time, I almost double my hourly wage. Yes I have the extra cost of liners and another box but that's probably about $2. So setting a minimum is more efficient use of my time.

A lot of people set a minimum price per order instead of a min number. For example, i think it's Indydebi who won't turn on her oven for less than $50. If that's 12 cupcakes at $5 a cupcake or small 6 inch cake it doesn't matter. The point is her time with her family and her personal life is worth more to her than $24 on a small order.

I hope that makes sense.




I couldn't have said it better myself thumbs_up.gif

sillywabbitz Posted 27 Feb 2012 , 5:47am
post #7 of 14

Cupcations, just wanted to say how much I enjoy your blog. Your cupcake designs are wonderful.

scp1127 Posted 27 Feb 2012 , 5:52am
post #8 of 14

Here was my first BRP box order before I opened and it still works today. Yes. you will spend some money, but unless you quit, you will use the boxes. I am not at a farmers market. I have a full line bakery. But every box does double duty for something else. I took advantage of the samples and I have about 20 to help make my decision.

14 x 10: quarter sheet cake, 12 cupcakes
10 x 10: 6 cupcakes, 8 & 9 inch cakes, pies, popcorn, cookies.
8 x 8: 4 cupcakes, popcorn, cookies, candy, 6 inch cakes
8 x 4: 2 cupcakes, candy, popcorn, cookies, mini corporate gifts

All have cupcake inserts. The only boxes I have to buy individually are half sheet and larger for wedding tier transport.

These boxes are pricey, especially when you add the insert. Be sure you charge.

When I open my shop, I am considering bags for one and two cupcakes. I will need them for smaller items anyway. I have them picked out from Nashville Wraps. They coordinate with the BRP boxes. They are not cheap either, but considerably less than the boxes. I use the tulip liners which gives them some added protection, allowing me to consider a bag.

I know it is a big investment up front, but buying in bulk, no matter who you chose to buy from, is one of the easiest ways to pay yourself. If you don't watch your small expenditures, it will really bite into your bottom line.

sillywabbitz Posted 27 Feb 2012 , 6:13am
post #9 of 14

Scp1127,
Thank you for posting this. I never realized my 10x10 boxes worked or 6 cupcakes. Time to order the insertsicon_smile.gif

And on the 'buy in bulk' comment. 100 inserts is $5 more than 20. It just makes good sense to buy in bulk.

If you have a local cake club, see if you can get a few people to split an order, that way you're not out so much money initially.

scp1127 Posted 27 Feb 2012 , 6:54am
post #10 of 14

sillywabbitz, just take advantage of their samples. I put every one together and stared at them on the dining room table for a month. Lots of choices had to be made. For example, the pie looks fine in the 4" tall box. The box of two is perfect for samples or a small gift to a great client when you have a few extra.

I forgot, I use the 9 oz clear plastic cups with tops for my singles.

sillywabbitz Posted 27 Feb 2012 , 2:21pm
post #11 of 14

Thanks. I did order a few samples before my first order but I wasn't using them for planningicon_smile.gif I was testing color, stability and just general size. I think I will definately order additional samples.

Also to the original poster: I know you specifically asked about cupcakes but I just wanted to mention one more thing. You don't need every size cake box. For example, I use 12 inch boxes for 8, 9, and 10 inch cakes. They all look nice on a 12 inch board and hence work in a 12 inch box. I can use a 10 inch box for 6, 7, and 8 inch cakes and apparently 6 cupcakesicon_smile.gif.

Cupcations Posted 27 Feb 2012 , 4:44pm
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by sillywabbitz

Cupcations, just wanted to say how much I enjoy your blog. Your cupcake designs are wonderful.




Thank you sillywabbitz icon_smile.gif glad you like it thumbs_up.gif

cakespender Posted 28 Feb 2012 , 3:55am
post #13 of 14

Thank you so much guys, this is such a great reply! You perfectly explained the minimum order. I think for now I will be happy just to get some orders. I am not doing cakes, right now I am only cupcakes. I was fully planning on doing bulk orders from BRP, such great prices!
So I'm thinking I will just get a order of singles on up to dozen, then I will have the inventory. I have a budget for start up so the money is there.
I have a feeling you guys are going to be my fountain of knowledge!

scp1127 Posted 28 Feb 2012 , 6:35am
post #14 of 14

You will be shocked when you find out how thick and sturdy these boxes are compared to others on the market. I exclusively use the pink ones. They are shiny and plastic coated. I also only use the windowed boxes.

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