1St Anniversary Tier

Decorating By bluedaisies Updated 26 Feb 2012 , 12:49pm by southerncross

bluedaisies Posted 26 Feb 2012 , 2:36am
post #1 of 8

I'm doing my first wedding cake in a couple of months and the couple is wanting to keep the top tier for their first anniversary. Is there anything special I need to do make that possible? It will be on a board and covered in fondant.

Thanks!

7 replies
supatrukka Posted 26 Feb 2012 , 3:38am
post #2 of 8

I always make top tiers that want to be kept out of styro, unless of course they want to be able to eat it. If it's a mud cake or something perishable then after the wedding it can be wrapped up really well to stop condensation, and put in the freezer.

bluedaisies Posted 26 Feb 2012 , 3:46am
post #3 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by supatrukka

I always make top tiers that want to be kept out of styro, unless of course they want to be able to eat it. If it's a mud cake or something perishable then after the wedding it can be wrapped up really well to stop condensation, and put in the freezer.




Yeah they want to eat it. I'm assuming I just tell them to wrap it well in plastic wrap and foil and freeze. Nothing else to it I would think.. but that's why I'm asking since I haven't done it before. Hubby and I didn't keep our top tier.

IvyCakes Posted 26 Feb 2012 , 3:59am
post #4 of 8

I haven't done it myself, but this is something I read about it a while back, hopefully it can ease any worries about it. icon_biggrin.gif

http://nyccakegirl.com/2011/11/21/the-top-tier/

Every now and then, I see a post with someone saying their cake tastes yucky after being frozen, or they don't want to serve clients old frozen cake. I'm not sure but I wonder if some recipes freeze badly and others don't? Something I'll have to look into some day...if I ever get freezer space. :<

sing Posted 26 Feb 2012 , 4:24am
post #5 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by IvyCakes

I haven't done it myself, but this is something I read about it a while back, hopefully it can ease any worries about it. icon_biggrin.gif

http://nyccakegirl.com/2011/11/21/the-top-tier/

Every now and then, I see a post with someone saying their cake tastes yucky after being frozen, or they don't want to serve clients old frozen cake. I'm not sure but I wonder if some recipes freeze badly and others don't? Something I'll have to look into some day...if I ever get freezer space. :<




That's interesting, I would also like to know if some recipes are able to freeze better than others. Good question thumbs_up.gif

HootersAlicia Posted 26 Feb 2012 , 4:33am
post #6 of 8

I've found that Glad cling wrap is best for this. If you keep air out it should be fine a year later. I usually use a frosting filling for keeping tiers even if the other tiers have other fillings. I don't know if that's necessary, but it seems like one less thing to worry about.

Funny story: My mom made my wedding cake and sealed and stored the top tier for me (my apartment was about the size of the 6" tier). She had a bottom drawer freezer and it defrosted and soaked the cake, so she made a new one and put it back. Then someone dropped something on it so she made another one. The cake we ate on our first anniversary was actually only about three months old.

Unlimited Posted 26 Feb 2012 , 11:31am
post #7 of 8

Just provide a bakery box so the venue can package it for whomever will be in charge of carrying it home, and instructions for wrapping/freezing/thawing.

southerncross Posted 26 Feb 2012 , 12:49pm
post #8 of 8

I never believed that a cake (especially covered in fondant) could survive a year in a freezer without deterioration in flavor. I always offered to make a free top tier on the couple's first anniversary but tradition always seemed to trump that offer.
For the past six years, my brides have always wrapped that top tier (usually a 6") in plastic wrap and then double foil wrap and tucked it into the deep freeze (in our rural area everyone seems to have access to a deep freeze) and they all report that the cake tastes perfect on their anniversary. The sugar flowers are removed before the cake is frozen and saved in an airtight container (often under a glass dome with a small silicate gel pack) The cake is completely thawed in its wrap and there hasn't been any problem with condensation on the fondant (I use Albert Uster's Americana or White Chocolate).

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