How Much Buttercream?

Baking By DisneyDreamer Updated 25 Feb 2012 , 3:32am by sing

DisneyDreamer Posted 24 Feb 2012 , 6:09am
post #1 of 9

Im making 150 cupcakes with a "rose" type swill on top how much buttercream will i need? also they want the "rose" swill i was thinking if cutting with the buttercream with pastry pride whipped topping to make the buttercream lighter will it still hold its form??

8 replies
Cupcations Posted 24 Feb 2012 , 11:59pm
post #2 of 9

The best way to know is: to ice one cupcake, remove the icing with a flat spatula, weigh the (removed) icing and then multiply its weight by the number cupcakes.

HTH

scp1127 Posted 25 Feb 2012 , 12:58am
post #3 of 9

I didn't know how to answer because I just know how many cupcakes each recipe makes. Which leads to the reason for my post.

I have mentioned before that my recipes start to look like science lab experiments with notes, corrections, and changes.

When you make a batch of cupcakes and a batch of frosting, jot down on the frosting recipe (and the cupcake recipe, for that matter) exactly how much each recipe makes. For example, "covers 24 cupcakes".

Then when you get a large order, you automatically know how much to make.

Bridgette1129 Posted 25 Feb 2012 , 1:11am
post #4 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by scp1127

When you make a batch of cupcakes and a batch of frosting, jot down on the frosting recipe (and the cupcake recipe, for that matter) exactly how much each recipe makes. For example, "covers 24 cupcakes".

Then when you get a large order, you automatically know how much to make.




I do this too. It's SUPER helpful. Although I keep track of it on my typed recipes on Google Docs. Same thing though.

I've also used cupcake recipes that make 12 (I use a portion scoop to fill liners) and when I doubled it it only made 23. It's frustrating, but I make note of it so I know for next time to make more batter. It happens rarely, but happens.

Bridgette1129 Posted 25 Feb 2012 , 1:12am
post #5 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cupcations

The best way to know is: to ice one cupcake, remove the icing with a flat spatula, weigh the (removed) icing and then multiply its weight by the number cupcakes.

HTH




thumbs_up.gif

Apti Posted 25 Feb 2012 , 1:24am
post #6 of 9

Disneydreamer~~There is a lot of information regarding the amount needed to frost cupcakes in this Wilton thread:
http://www.wilton.com/forums/messageview.cfm?catid=8&threadid=150674&FTVAR_MSGDBTABLE=&STARTPAGE=1

If you read it all the way through, you should have an excellent idea of what you'll need.

Personally, I would not suggest combining Pastry Pride and buttercream.

scp1127 Posted 25 Feb 2012 , 1:49am
post #7 of 9

Another issue, especially if using a chart, is the personal preference of how much frosting is actually used. I tend to use less than those really tall ones you see in stores and I don't go over the sides. I like for a person to actually take a bite without wearing it on their face. Plus I look for a balance of cake to frosting.

So it is still a good idea to keep a record.

Another tip to those who have grams on your scale.... this is a great way to be more exact in multiplications. If everything is weighed in grams, even eggs, you can easily get precise on your measurements. For example, if your recipe covers 24 and you need 40, take every ingredient, divide by 24 and then multiply that number by 40. It basically takes the ingredient to one unit and then you can multiply by any number you need. If you have only ounces or even if you use cups and spoons, you can still do this, but you can't accurately split eggs without a scale unless you just eyeball it. And your leaveners will be hard to measure exactly, but it can be done.

DisneyDreamer Posted 25 Feb 2012 , 3:28am
post #8 of 9

thanks everyone for the tips i appreciate it! does anyone but buckets of buttercream?? not wilton but other brands?

sing Posted 25 Feb 2012 , 3:32am
post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cupcations

The best way to know is: to ice one cupcake, remove the icing with a flat spatula, weigh the (removed) icing and then multiply its weight by the number cupcakes.

HTH




Smart idea thumbs_up.gif

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