BuffytheBakingSlayer Posted 19 Feb 2012 , 10:57pm
post #1 of

In reading a posting about a problematic RI, it made me wonder how people get their yolks and whites completely separated.

I have been at the separation for a long time (I have eaten egg whites for years), but I am still really bad at it. Invariable I cannot get all eggs to separate properly. If I manage to keep the yolk intact, usually not all the white separates. For scrambled eggs, not a huge deal. but it can be for cooking otherwise, and especially baking.

I have purchased various gadgets over the years, to no real avail.

I would love to here people's tips for successfully separating eggs.

Thanks!

46 replies
bobwonderbuns Posted 19 Feb 2012 , 11:04pm
post #2 of

I use the shell. I crack the egg over a bowl then pour the yolk back and forth into both parts of the shell letting the egg white fall into the bowl. Works like a charm! icon_biggrin.gif

MsGF Posted 19 Feb 2012 , 11:26pm
post #3 of

I do it exactly the same as bobwonderbuns. In fact I separated 12 of them today. All with great success. I hate gadgets, I find they are more trouble then they are worth.

Practice & Patience

Take Care

WeezyS Posted 20 Feb 2012 , 12:51am
post #4 of

I do it the old fashion way taught to me by my grandmother.

I crack the egg into the palm of my hand, then seperate my fingers slightly and wiggle the egg up to my fingers and the whites fall through my fingers with the yolk left behind. Really easy.The shell method also works great.

DianeLM Posted 20 Feb 2012 , 1:12am
post #5 of

I do the same as Weezy, except I crack all my eggs into a bowl first, then fish out the yolks. If it's for meringue where there can't be a hint of yolk, I'll break the egg into a small bowl, fish out the yolk, then transfer to the main white collection bowl.

Separating will be MUCH easier if your eggs are cold. If you need room temp eggs, separate them while cold, then cover the bowls and let them come to temp.

I always wear foodsafe gloves (not latex) for two reasons - first, because it's more sanitary and second, because those eggs are C-O-L-D!! The gloves help protect my hands from frostbite! icon_wink.gif

Elcee Posted 20 Feb 2012 , 2:07am
post #6 of

I used the egg shell method for years UNTIL I was coerced to attend a Pampered Chef party. I hate sales parties; I can't help feeling that I MUST buy something; I usually RSVP with an emphatic NO... but this time, in my quest to find something inexpensive and not too useless, I purchased their egg separator. I love it. icon_biggrin.gif

Gerle Posted 20 Feb 2012 , 2:39am
post #7 of

I use to use the shell method, but too many times the yolk would hit the side of the shell and break, so I do as several others said -- I break the egg into my hand and separate it that way. It works really well and I definitely keep the yolks and whites separate. I've also tried some of the gadgets from Pampered Chef and Tupperware, but prefer the hand method the best.

auzzi Posted 20 Feb 2012 , 3:03am
post #8 of

The "shell method' is considered to be an unsafe Food Practice these days.

Even with washing , its possible for bacteria to remain in the shells pores. Egg producers advise the usage of an egg separator to separate egg parts.

Also don't use eggshell to remove shell particles that fall into a mixture. And don't use eggshells to measure other foods.

Laulie Posted 20 Feb 2012 , 3:17am
post #9 of

I hava always used the egg shell method with no issues. If it is for something that can't have ANY yolk, I will do as others have said and do it over a separate bowl just in case, before adding to the rest.

Curtsmin24 Posted 20 Feb 2012 , 3:28am

I separate the eggs in my hand as well. It's so much faster for me than going back and forth with the shell. I have done it that way and broken the yolks as well. I have tried one or two egg separaters but didn't like them either. It is, as someone previously posted, much easier when the eggs are cold.

KoryAK Posted 20 Feb 2012 , 5:49am

If I need just a couple of eggs, I do it right in my hand. If I need a bunch (this is 99% of the time) I crack them all into one bowl then fish out all of the yolks. Shells are sharp and you are more likely to bust a yolk. Also, crack your eggs on a flat surface NOT the edge of the bowl for far less sharp edges and shell shrapnel.

scp1127 Posted 20 Feb 2012 , 6:03am

I use the shell method.

I'm not sure how this can be unsafe if the egg reaches the minimum 160 degrees.

I just checked the egg board and the separator method is the one they recommend due to what auzzi said.

But if you read just a few sentences down, it clearly states that 160 degrees kills all.

So for baking, do what you want. The separator method described by the egg board is clearly in cases where the egg does not reach 165, such as sunny side up.

For those of you who use SMBC, it is important for those whites to reach 160. I know many who just look and can tell, but lower than 160 is unsafe to some succeptible groups.

sing Posted 20 Feb 2012 , 6:42am
Quote:
Originally Posted by DianeLM

I do the same as Weezy, except I crack all my eggs into a bowl first, then fish out the yolks. If it's for meringue where there can't be a hint of yolk, I'll break the egg into a small bowl, fish out the yolk, then transfer to the main white collection bowl.

Separating will be MUCH easier if your eggs are cold. If you need room temp eggs, separate them while cold, then cover the bowls and let them come to temp.

I always wear foodsafe gloves (not latex) for two reasons - first, because it's more sanitary and second, because those eggs are C-O-L-D!! The gloves help protect my hands from frostbite! icon_wink.gif




Good tip thumbs_up.gif

theicedqueen Posted 20 Feb 2012 , 6:44am

Shell method, cold eggs, no gadgets. Minimalist!

lyndim Posted 20 Feb 2012 , 7:04am

Shell method, old school here!

AnnieCahill Posted 20 Feb 2012 , 11:58am

I use the shell.

milkmaid42 Posted 20 Feb 2012 , 2:05pm

Usually the shell method with cold eggs. However, last week I was letting my 4 and 5 yr old grand daughters "help" me make breakfast and I introduced them to the hand method. It was definitely an experience they will remember: every child's fantasy! (A hands-on learning experience icon_redface.gif , pun intended) We had a successful omelette and happy kids.

Jan

jamawoops Posted 20 Feb 2012 , 3:03pm

I thought the shell method was the only method. I don't cook much lol! That's why I love this site, I find such useful tips here! I will definitley be trying the hand method next time as I always seem to pierce one of the yolks with the shell when separating! Thanks!!

icer101 Posted 20 Feb 2012 , 3:19pm

I have used the little gadget for years. I love it. I crack an egg into a cup, look at it really good. Don,t want to see anything in it(shells, blood, whatever) . I then put it in another bowl, Then crack rest the same way. Then i add them to my batter 1 at a time. This is the way, i can be sure all of them are ok.Call me finiky(sp?) We all have our different ways, don,t we? They are all right for each of us.

BuffytheBakingSlayer Posted 21 Feb 2012 , 1:55am

I appreciate all the advice. I use the shell method, but it doesn't really work for me well. Maybe it is the eggs I have been using. I have been using pasteurized eggs. I have a little one and also I make french silk pie all the time for my husband. We also have several elderly family members. I don't want to have to worry about the bacteria with my baby (even when just making scrambled eggs) or the seniors. Those eggs seem to be that they have thinner shells and the yolks break really easily. or maybe it is just me. icon_biggrin.gif

I have also tried the hand method to varying success. I will have to try the fishing out method. Maybe that will work better for me!

Thanks for all the help! icon_biggrin.gif

scp1127 Posted 21 Feb 2012 , 7:41am

If you are concerned about the safety, read the egg board. It is the official site for egg info and egg safety.

imagenthatnj Posted 21 Feb 2012 , 3:49pm

Three-bowl method, with either my hand or a slotted spoon (Alton Brown tip) over one of the bowls; then transfer the yolk to one container, and the whites to the other one.

It goes really fast once you do it a lot and if you happen to break a yolk by accident, only one egg white gets messed up. The others are safe in their container.

BuffytheBakingSlayer Posted 21 Feb 2012 , 6:52pm

Slotted spoon! SO smart! I LOVE Alton Brown. And i need to use that for his choco chip cookie recipe. I like chewy,and that calls for one egg yolk.

I will try this as well as the fishing method. Also the 3 bowls. The messed up ones can become scrambled eggs for breakfast.

bernerluv Posted 26 Feb 2012 , 3:07pm

Here is what I use.....made for me by my Dad! Works like a charm and I can do about 3 eggs at a time!
LL

ycknits Posted 26 Feb 2012 , 3:13pm

I take my eggs out of the refrigerator as soon as I know I'm going to bake. Warm eggs separate much more readily than cold. Then I use an egg separator - only because it facilitates measuring the egg whites in the collection cup. And I always measure my egg whites. 8 egg whites equals one cup, except when it only takes seven!

imagenthatnj Posted 26 Feb 2012 , 4:01pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by ycknits

I take my eggs out of the refrigerator as soon as I know I'm going to bake. Warm eggs separate much more readily than cold. Then I use an egg separator - only because it facilitates measuring the egg whites in the collection cup. And I always measure my egg whites. 8 egg whites equals one cup, except when it only takes seven!




Actually, every pastry book and baking books say to separate eggs when cold, because it's easier this way. If you google: separate eggs when cold, you'll find all the entries that advise this. Separate when cold and let them warm to room temperature on separate bowls for baking.

And yes, you should always measure the egg whites. I weigh mine.

KoryAK Posted 26 Feb 2012 , 8:22pm

Everything in a egg is a little looser when warm. Yes the white will separate from the yolk a little easier then BUT the yolk will be far more likely to break. Your choice.

imagenthatnj Posted 26 Feb 2012 , 8:34pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by KoryAK

Everything in a egg is a little looser when warm. Yes the white will separate from the yolk a little easier then BUT the yolk will be far more likely to break. Your choice.




KoryAk, I thought about that after I hit the Submit button. I thought that maybe it's good for separating with the egg separator. And then I thought about the yolk and how much easier it would be to break it when warm.

scp1127 Posted 27 Feb 2012 , 4:42am

I'm with imagenthat, separate when cold. The yolks are so much stronger. Lately, I've gotten to where I can crack the egg, inspect it in the half shell, then turn the shell to separate where there are no protruding jagged edges, and bypass the three bowl method. If I get a spot of yolk, and I did once, I just get it out.

Remember costumeczar's experiment with fat and egg whites? If not, it may have been in her blog. Well, here is my take on the fat issue. She proceeded to do everything wrong... not de-greasing her whip, a little yolk, etc. In every case, she had perfect whites. So my scientific approach to this is that today we have incredible mixers with plenty of wattage. Our grandmothers had a manual beater or a hand mixer. Before that, good old arm power. I think that these super mixers can overcome small amounts of fat in the whites. So the higher the wattage, the more forgiving the whites.

So when I get a drop of yolk in my whites, I don't worry about it. I touch it with the edge of a paper towel to absorb it. I have a KA Pro610 and an older Heavy Duty that is a dream. I'm sure the Artisan would also stand up to a drop of yolk. I also add cream of tartar to my whites.

I also weigh all of my eggs. I have a chart of whites, whole, and yolks in grams, on my refrigerator. My baking is much more consistent. You would be surprised just how off a large egg can be. Also, recipes calling for extra-large or medium eggs no longer require purchasing different size eggs.

bobwonderbuns Posted 3 Mar 2012 , 2:03am
Quote:
Originally Posted by scp1127


I also weigh all of my eggs. I have a chart of whites, whole, and yolks in grams, on my refrigerator. My baking is much more consistent. You would be surprised just how off a large egg can be. Also, recipes calling for extra-large or medium eggs no longer require purchasing different size eggs.




I am VERY interested in this chart -- did you make it yourself or is there one online someplace? I've looked all over the place and can't find one for the life of me!! icon_cry.gificon_lol.gif

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