Homemade Marshmallows - Gelatin

Decorating By Dayti Updated 18 Feb 2012 , 1:32am by scp1127

Dayti Posted 15 Feb 2012 , 11:26pm
post #1 of 15

I am thinking of making up bags of homemade marshmallows to sell in my shop. A brief search led me to this recipe by Alton Brown: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/homemade-marshmallows-recipe/index.html

* 3 packages unflavored gelatin
* 1 cup ice cold water, divided
* 12 ounces granulated sugar, approximately 1 1/2 cups
* 1 cup light corn syrup
* 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
* 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
* 1/4 cup confectioners' sugar
* 1/4 cup cornstarch
* Nonstick spray

Please could someone tell me how much is in "a package" of gelatin? Ideally looking for the weight.

Also, is there a reason for using kosher salt? Can I use regular table salt? I'm not sure of the difference.

Thanks!

14 replies
cheatize Posted 15 Feb 2012 , 11:37pm
post #2 of 15

My package says 1 envelope weighs 7 grams.

Occther Posted 15 Feb 2012 , 11:39pm
post #3 of 15

Quote from Knox Gelatin site
"1 pouch is about 2 1/2 teaspoons (7g) unflavoured gelatine. If a recipe calls for 1 tablespoon, use 1 pouch of unflavoured gelatine. Each pouch will gel 2 cups (500mL) of liquid and up to 1 1/2 (375mL) cups of solids.

matthewkyrankelly Posted 15 Feb 2012 , 11:41pm
post #4 of 15

Two things about salt.

Kosher has nothing else in it and is bigger grains.

If you use table salt use 25% less. Some people think the additives can be detected in the final product. I've never been able to tell.

Dayti Posted 15 Feb 2012 , 11:44pm
post #5 of 15

Thanks. So 3 envelopes/pouches totalling 21g, right? Guessing 1 package according to the recipe is really 1 envelope/pouch?

Dayti Posted 15 Feb 2012 , 11:46pm
post #6 of 15

I'm just going to go for regular salt then. My salt just says 100% sea salt on it. And that's what I've used all my life and it just tastes like...salt. icon_biggrin.gif

costumeczar Posted 16 Feb 2012 , 2:16am
post #7 of 15

Bobby Flay did a taste test comparison with people and they couldn't tell the difference between a bunch of different kinds of salt. He said that chefs like to use different kinds because it's trendy, and that the larger grained kinds give a nice crunch in some things, but flavor-wise it's pretty much the same.

I did some marshmallows using this recipe http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Homemade-Marshmallows-242701 and I think I liked it better than Alton Brown's if you want to try a different one.

scp1127 Posted 17 Feb 2012 , 8:13am
post #8 of 15

I have to disagree on the salt. Alton Brown is a spokesperson for Diamond Kosher Salt. Many chefs use this brand because it is not a crystal, but rather a flake. It blends and dissolves in food better than a crystal. Table salt is the most harsh salt with hard crystals.

I use Alton's as my marshmallow base, but I made changes after researching numerous recipes. They came out perfectly. I did use NM vanilla bean paste and my homemade vanilla extract. They kept well too. I think they would be great with some different extracts added.

Whenever I want to know the weight, I just buy the package called for in the recipe and weigh it in grams. I can then use any form I want.

scp1127 Posted 17 Feb 2012 , 8:18am
post #9 of 15

costumeczar, I wasn't rebutting you. I agree that when used properly, I can't tell the difference. The salt I was referring to is more forgiving and is just easier to use. When used in dessert, it is my opinion that we need to be a little more careful of our salt type and amounts because it is not supposed to be an added flavor like it is in many savory recipes.

costumeczar Posted 17 Feb 2012 , 11:42am
post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by scp1127

costumeczar, I wasn't rebutting you. I agree that when used properly, I can't tell the difference. The salt I was referring to is more forgiving and is just easier to use. When used in dessert, it is my opinion that we need to be a little more careful of our salt type and amounts because it is not supposed to be an added flavor like it is in many savory recipes.




You can rebut me, I was just saying that flavor-wise there isn't any difference that people could tell. As far as ease of use goes that's a good point, but since I tend to ignore salt in a lot of sweet recipes anyway I just stick to table salt for when I do use it. icon_smile.gif

matthewkyrankelly Posted 17 Feb 2012 , 1:22pm
post #11 of 15

The major issue with the salt is the size of the grain. Kosher salt is usually bigger and therefore there is less by weight in the same volume. Cook's Illustrated went into the differences in a brining article a while back. That's where the 25% difference between table salt(small grains - little spaces) and Kosher salt(large grains - big spaces) came from.

So, someone asks a simple question about their marshmallow recipe and they get a big debate on salt. icon_biggrin.gif

Dayti Posted 17 Feb 2012 , 8:57pm
post #12 of 15

I don't mind a good bit of healthy debating! Thanks for all your replies everyone.

sillywabbitz Posted 17 Feb 2012 , 9:12pm
post #13 of 15

Has anyone tried the recipes that include egg whites ? I tried it once but I think I messed it up.

Herekittykitty Posted 17 Feb 2012 , 9:24pm
post #14 of 15

The recipe I use is very similar to Costumeczar's. It makes wonderful marshmellows.

Remember, you will not get all the "batter" out of the bowl when transferring to the pan. You can try but just have to accept that there will some waste. Also wet whatever item you are using to transfer/spread the "batter" otherwise you will have a stringy, sticky mess.

scp1127 Posted 18 Feb 2012 , 1:32am
post #15 of 15

costumeczar, my post was disagreeing with an earlier post referring to the size of kosher salt being larger. After I wrote it, I realized it may have looked like I was disagreeing with you. I think our baking styles are similar and I rarely have anything to add to your informative posts.

Gesine Bullock_Prado uses egg whites. I refer to her knowledge of sugar quite often. I haven't made them, but she says it makes a noticeable addition.

I have a project coming up to reproduce the original marshmallow using the marsh mallow plant. I replicate historic candies that are sold in museum gift shops all over the country. I am really looking forward to working on this recipe. I think it's due in March.

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