fcakes Posted 7 Feb 2012 , 1:26am
post #1 of

I got a request if I could do a cake like this, without the strawberries. How can we have 1/2 white and 1/2 chocolate? Use buttercream and ganache?

Any good tips on doing the drizzle neatly? Also, how much would you quote per serving for a wedding cake like this?

Appreciate your help so much! Thanks!!
LL

25 replies
msthang1224 Posted 7 Feb 2012 , 2:21am
post #2 of

Hi,

This cake is awesome!!

I could be wrong but, It looks like this cake was covered in brown fondant on one side and white on the other.
I would very carefullypour the gananche from the center of the TOP cake and just let it flow normally over the sides of the cake. The other tiers were probably poured along the sides and not the center bc they would have to be stacked. And I would assume that the ganache would get in the way of the stacking process if all the cakes had ganache poured from the center of them. JMO

fcakes Posted 7 Feb 2012 , 3:38am
post #3 of

Thanks msthang1224! The drizzle does appear to be done after stacking, right?

Any idea on how to cover each tier with white and brown fondant? Roll and cut in half and cover?

The center drape could be put on after stacking too, I suppose?

How much would you guys charge? I'm thinking $4.50 per serving...

msthang1224 Posted 7 Feb 2012 , 4:39am
post #4 of

Hi,

You probably can do it after stacking BUT, I would do each tier seperately just to be on the safe side.

Yes, I would do it almost half and half but pay attention when yr stacking bc it looks like this cake is not exactly straight in its appearance. i mean, It looks like it hasnt been stacked where the fondant lines up exact to match on each cake. Take a look at the sides of the cake and you should be able to see a lil slant, like theres some curvage to it. then the ruffle of donat is placed on after everything else.

That seems like a goo price per slice icon_smile.gif

FromScratchSF Posted 7 Feb 2012 , 5:05am
post #5 of

It looks like it's all covered in chocolate fondant then covered in white on the other side. The seam is covered with the white draping. The ganache I'd do at the end after everything is stacked.

akrainis Posted 7 Feb 2012 , 1:20pm
post #6 of

We do these poured ganache cakes at my bakery all the time... to get really clean drizzles down the sides, I just put the ganache in a parchment bag, it gives you a lot of control.

huntlilbel Posted 7 Feb 2012 , 1:51pm
post #7 of

it looks to me like the ganache was poured on each tier before, or as being stacked. maybe from the far side to avoid any misshap in the ganache? and then the white would go on last, that way it would cover any tiny imperfections. otherwise I dont know how they get the ganache to look SOO perfect against the tier on top of it? does that make sense? keep us posted, it is a beautiful cake and i would love to see how yours come out icon_biggrin.gif

pag41989 Posted 7 Feb 2012 , 2:05pm
post #8 of

I think these ladies are right with the fact that the ganache was added after the cake was covered also I just wanted to say that cake looks amazingly delicious.. I want a slice NOW. Time for breakfast icon_biggrin.gif

huntlilbel Posted 7 Feb 2012 , 2:15pm
post #9 of

ok, so after a closer look.. yes, i think all you ladies are correct icon_redface.gif It just looks so damn good that at first glance I assumed it couldnt be... cuz I dont know if I have that steady of a hand icon_biggrin.gif

HannahsMomi Posted 7 Feb 2012 , 2:43pm

Wow!! I love this cake....

fcakes Posted 7 Feb 2012 , 8:02pm

Thanks everyone for your input!! Really appreciate iticon_smile.gif

So to sum it up, cover the cake in brown fondant/chocolate fondant completely, then add the half white, decreasing the coverage as we go up the tiers.

Then stack the cake and drizzle the ganache.

The parchment cone is a good suggestion. I was thinking of using a squeeze bottle.

How much would you guys charge for a cake like this? Want to see if I am in the average price range. Thanks!!

FromScratchSF Posted 7 Feb 2012 , 8:06pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by fcakes

Thanks everyone for your input!! Really appreciate iticon_smile.gif

So to sum it up, cover the cake in brown fondant/chocolate fondant completely, then add the half white, decreasing the coverage as we go up the tiers.

Then stack the cake and drizzle the ganache.

The parchment cone is a good suggestion. I was thinking of using a squeeze bottle.

How much would you guys charge for a cake like this? Want to see if I am in the average price range. Thanks!!




What I would charge for this has no bearing on what you can charge for this. Sorry to be so non-helpful with that but you have to work out your costs, overhead, and time all on your own. thumbs_up.gif

fcakes Posted 7 Feb 2012 , 9:32pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by FromScratchSF

Quote:
Originally Posted by fcakes

Thanks everyone for your input!! Really appreciate iticon_smile.gif

So to sum it up, cover the cake in brown fondant/chocolate fondant completely, then add the half white, decreasing the coverage as we go up the tiers.

Then stack the cake and drizzle the ganache.

The parchment cone is a good suggestion. I was thinking of using a squeeze bottle.

How much would you guys charge for a cake like this? Want to see if I am in the average price range. Thanks!!



What I would charge for this has no bearing on what you can charge for this. Sorry to be so non-helpful with that but you have to work out your costs, overhead, and time all on your own. thumbs_up.gif


Yes... true that it would have no bearing but just wanted to get an idea of what others would charge for a similar cake... out of curiosity icon_smile.gif

shannycakers Posted 10 Apr 2012 , 5:41pm

one last question no one has addressed.. If you put the white fondant on half of the cake, when you go to stack it, wont the cakes be tilted uneven since the top of cake will be higher where the fondant is/ compared to the brown ?

bobwonderbuns Posted 10 Apr 2012 , 5:46pm

What a great thread!! icon_biggrin.gif

shanter Posted 10 Apr 2012 , 6:12pm

When you put the white fondant on, just go barely over the edge on the top of the cake layer. Then the next layer will fit, centered, without sitting on the white fondant. Does that make sense?
HTH

Sami3000 Posted 11 Apr 2012 , 9:38pm

Seeing as there is a bottom border along each tier on the white side, you could partially cover the chocolate in white then use a cake circle for the next tier to cut away the excess on the top. That way you'd have a flat surface for stacking but be able to cover any peekaboo chocolate showing.

Linda J Posted 25 Feb 2013 , 6:15pm

A[IMG]http://cakecentral.com/content/type/61/id/2932234/width/200/height/400[/IMG] Finally made my own it was a 6, 8, 10, 12" cake. First I covered all cakes with a ctumb coat, marked a line half way through each cake for a placement reference. Then I rolled out the white fondant for the 12" cake (22" circle). Cut the circle in half, lifted it onto the cake (using my line as a reference) and molded it in place. I took the other half of the white fondant piece and put it on my 10" cake. Rolled out another white piece for the 8" cake and followed the same procedure, doing the 8 & 6". After all the cakes were done in half white fondant I repeated the procedure with the chocolate fondant. I "glued" the pieces of fondant together by brushing a small amount of water in the crack berween the two fondants and held them together. As I stacked them I offset each cake by an inch, giving it that diagonal look. Then I filled a bag with melted ganache, starting at the top, I drizzled across chocolate top and down the sides of the 6", then starting at the juncture of the 6 & 8" drizzled down the 8" etc. Decorated the white side in different scroll patterns. Cut and placed the drapes at each seam (starting at the bottom layer). Hope this helps.

fcakes Posted 26 Feb 2013 , 1:25am

AThank you so much for the details Linda! Appreciate it! The cake looks fab!!

TheTattooedCakeLady Posted 4 Jun 2013 , 4:22pm

http://www.ohmz.net/tag/shockleys-sweet-shop/

This is the company that made the cake. I am doing one myself this week, so I was trying to do a little research. Maybe they would give some insight if emailed privately :)

Baking Sis Posted 4 Jun 2013 , 4:52pm

You did a very nice job with your cake; thanks for the all the tips!

NHQUEEN Posted 4 Jun 2013 , 5:16pm

Wonderful Job!!!

SeptBabyMom Posted 4 Sep 2014 , 1:10pm

I am making this cake this weekend.... I just assumed all along that I would cover all layers in white first (which is already done) and then cover half in the brown fondant.... That is my next step and I wanted to be sure this was a good idea. But then I was thinking about how to deal with the fondant at the top when I place on the next tier.... I think I have it figured out. I hope it goes smoothly.

kkmcmahan Posted 4 Sep 2014 , 1:15pm

Well done Linda! It came out beautiful, and thanks for the details of what you did.  I'm dying to try one of these.

ellavanilla Posted 4 Sep 2014 , 3:05pm

nice job! i don't think it would have occurred to me that the tiers were offset, though they obviously are! well done!

MBalaska Posted 4 Sep 2014 , 6:16pm

Quote:

Originally Posted by Linda J 

400
"Finally made my own it was a 6, 8, 10, 12" cake................Hope this helps."

 

Linda J you did a great job!  It's always fun to see someone's successful cake come to life.

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