rifmu Posted 6 Feb 2012 , 10:58pm
post #1 of

I've tried making frosting from coconut oil - it tasted amazing, piped ok, crusted great, but was very dense.
Is there a way to remedy that?
Thank you!

20 replies
carmijok Posted 6 Feb 2012 , 11:15pm
post #2 of

I'd be interested to know myself. How much coconut oil did you use in your recipe?

rifmu Posted 6 Feb 2012 , 11:28pm
post #3 of

1 cup coconut oil
4 cups ps
coconut milk to reach consistensy

zespri Posted 6 Feb 2012 , 11:36pm
post #4 of

If you're currently in winter, then that might be why. Here in NZ it's summer, and I just used some coconut oil this morning and it was kinda peanut butter consistency. In winter it's rock hard.

Perhaps add some whipped coconut cream?
http://nuttykitchen.com/2010/06/01/coconut-whipped-cream/

auzzi Posted 7 Feb 2012 , 12:51am
post #5 of

Coconut oil melts at 76°F (24°C) - how did you get past that?

zespri Posted 7 Feb 2012 , 1:15am
post #6 of

Auzzi, I sometimes use it to make buttercream, and have used it in the heat of summer. Mine is 'hardened coconut oil', not sure how they harden it. But as I said, it's texture without all the sugar etc in it is like peanut butter, so once the sugar is added in I guess it provides stabililty.

Not sure what the O.P. used though, maybe not hardened?

Quote:
Originally Posted by auzzi

Coconut oil melts at 76°F (24°C) - how did you get past that?


kelleym Posted 7 Feb 2012 , 1:19am
post #7 of

What is hardened coconut oil? Is that coconut oil-based shortening? I am intrigued.

rifmu Posted 7 Feb 2012 , 1:21am
post #8 of

mine is virgin coconut oil and it is hard. so what do i do? melt it a bit? but wouldn't it harden right back in the buttercream? I would like to get a fluffier consistency..

zespri Posted 7 Feb 2012 , 1:32am
post #9 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by kelleym

What is hardened coconut oil? Is that coconut oil-based shortening? I am intrigued.




You know how in the U.S.A. when people talk about shortening they are usually referring to Crisco? Well we don't have that stuff here, we have a product called Kremelta. It's consistency is NOT like crisco, but in my opinion it's much better for you (as the only two ingredients are hardened coconut oil and soya based lecithin), and it tastes better as it's coconut. Again, just my opinion!

Whenever a recipe calls for shortening, that's what I use, and I love it. In winter time it's hard as a rock though, sometimes I melt it down then wait for it to harden up just enough to mix in. But it makes a mighty fine caramel buttercream!

zespri Posted 7 Feb 2012 , 1:35am
Quote:
Originally Posted by rifmu

mine is virgin coconut oil and it is hard. so what do i do? melt it a bit? but wouldn't it harden right back in the buttercream? I would like to get a fluffier consistency..




Yes, it will harden back up if you melt it, but that might be the only way to make it usable for you. Did you consider my suggestion of adding some whipped coconut cream into it to make it fluffier?

rifmu Posted 7 Feb 2012 , 1:55am

yes, i'll have to look into coconut cream, thank you

auzzi Posted 7 Feb 2012 , 11:23pm

There's a world of difference between coconut oil and Kremelta NZ [copha AU].

Coconut oil is either an unrefined [virgin] or refined vegetable oil that exists in a semi-solid state at room temperature. It melts around melt at 24°C.

Copha and Kremelta, on the other hand, are hydrogenated coconut oils. Hydrogenation changes a liquid vegetable oils to a semi-solid fats [partial hydrogentation like Crisco] or a solid [full hydrogentation]. Copha is block solid at room temperature. It melts around 38°C. I was under the impression that Kremelta was the same consistency. A texture like peanut butter is not what I envisioned.

All vegetable oils have different densities. Coconut is one of the denser oils. Coconut cream will "dilute" the mix but it will not change the inherent characteristic of a hydrogenated oil to harden at room temperature. The frosting should be "lighter" in texture but it will still "crust" or harden at room temperature.

Shortenings are available from foodservice and catering supplies. Try http://www.gffoodservice.co.nz [look under "bakery fats and oils"]

zespri Posted 7 Feb 2012 , 11:36pm

That's really interesting auzzi. So I guess 'hydrogenisation' is what they mean by 'hardened'.

The temperature at my house was around 25°C yesterday when I was using it. I know because I was on the verge of turning the air conditioner on all morning, so kept checking the temp icon_wink.gif

When I say 'peanut butter', I mean it was easy to take out of the container (in winter I have to scrape it out), and when I put it in a little bowl and smooshed it with a spoon it became spreadable almost immediately. Much like the peanut butter I use.

Do you happen to know the ingredients of Copha? I'd be interested to know how similar they are.

auzzi Posted 8 Feb 2012 , 11:01pm

Copha - Coconut oil, soya Bean lecithin

As I said, copha is rock sold. When cut by a knife, it cracks halfway through, and flakes into pieces. "smooshing it with a spoon" would not achieve anything.

zespri Posted 8 Feb 2012 , 11:08pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by auzzi

Copha - Coconut oil, soya Bean lecithin

As I said, copha is rock sold. When cut by a knife, it cracks halfway through, and flakes into pieces. "smooshing it with a spoon" would not achieve anything.




I guess that answers that question then, despite having the same ingredients Copha and Kremelta musn't be prepared the same way. The temperature is 25 in my house today, I just pulled out my Kremelta, scraped some out with a knife, then smeared it on a surface as if I was spreading butter on toast, no problem at all.

mclaren Posted 9 Feb 2012 , 12:51am

Coconuts (fresh ones) are abundant here where I live, and if not for this thread, I would not have imagined there exist coconut OILs elsewhere in this world in semi solid form.
Over here when we say oil, it is always fluid.
My mom used to make coconut oil by boiling coconut cream for some time (prolly an hour?) until all the cream turned into clear light golden liquid.

What is whipped coconut cream? How is the texture like? Exactly like whipped cream? Over here we squeeze the grated coconut flesh to get coconut cream (which has milk-like consistency). But never seen whipped ones around.

Very, very interesting topic. ;p

zespri Posted 9 Feb 2012 , 12:55am

mclaren, your user details don't say where you are...?

When in fiji I bought some coconut oil at the airport, to be used for massage. When I got it home, it had gone solid in the bottle... doh! So you must be in a warm climate?

Whipped coconut cream:
http://nuttykitchen.com/2010/06/01/coconut-whipped-cream/

SweetSuzieQ Posted 9 Feb 2012 , 3:27am

I have this recipe bookmarked and, have heard it is great! I have made the cupcakes before but not the frosting. From what I understand, the coconut oil is like soft butter so would be used the same way as traditional buttercream. If it is dense, maybe try whip whip whip whipping longer! LOL

mclaren Posted 9 Feb 2012 , 10:16pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by zespri

mclaren, your user details don't say where you are...?

When in fiji I bought some coconut oil at the airport, to be used for massage. When I got it home, it had gone solid in the bottle... doh! So you must be in a warm climate?

Whipped coconut cream:
http://nuttykitchen.com/2010/06/01/coconut-whipped-cream/




Wow! Thanks, thanks, thanks Zespri for sharing the link. We use coconut cream a lot in our savoury dishes here and of course I've seen the same texture of coconut cream semi solid like how it was shown in the link when we refrigerate coconut cream leftovers unused, but since we always need to use it in liquid form, it has never crossed my mind there is a use for it in semi solid form LOL.
I cannot wait to try this, scooping out the top semi solid part and whipping it. Afterall coconut cream is cheaper than dairy cream over here, only that coconut cream's greasy but dairy cream's not.

Btw, i'm from a hot and humid climate of Asia, that explains the liquid vs solid issue LOL.

SweetSuzieQ Posted 10 Feb 2012 , 12:23am

Guess it would have been more helpful if I had actually posted the link!! LOL

http://chefchloe.com/sweets/fluffy-coconut-cupcakes.html

dollyandme Posted 10 Feb 2012 , 12:34am

I was talking to a baker yesterday who uses palm oil in buttercream . At first I thought coconut oil so asked to find out it was palm oil.

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