Carving Tres Leches Cake?

Decorating By BarbaraM0809 Updated 10 Feb 2012 , 3:05pm by BarbaraM0809

BarbaraM0809 Posted 6 Feb 2012 , 6:29pm
post #1 of 11

Hi again I'm back with another question....Just had another order for a cake. This lady would like tres leches cake, carved, covered in fondant, that looks like Rapunzel. She would be laying down on her back thank goodness lol. I read all the posts (I think icon_lol.gif ) about covering the cake with fondant my question is would it be best to carve the cakes and stack before I pour on the milks? Or pour on the milks, chill until firm, then stack and carve? I will be covering and filling with stabalized whipped frosting btw. Thanks for all the help!

10 replies
BlakesCakes Posted 6 Feb 2012 , 8:38pm
post #2 of 11

Sorry, can't be done. All of that moisture erodes the structure of the cake. It won't hold up when carved and it will melt the fondant from the underside, creating ugly sugar puddles of ooze.

To carve, you need a nice, sturdy, moist but NOT wet, cake without filling--only buttercream "glue" between the layers.

Also can't used whipped cream as an icing because it deflated under the weight of the fondant and the moisture in it also wrings out, making even a bigger mess.

Rae

AnnieCahill Posted 6 Feb 2012 , 8:42pm
post #3 of 11

I agree with Rae. Tres leches+fondant+carving=epic mess. Tell her to pick another flavor.

BarbaraM0809 Posted 6 Feb 2012 , 10:52pm
post #4 of 11

Thanks! I tried telling her that but she has her heart set on tres leches...maybe she'll be ok with a nice vanilla bean...

BlakesCakes Posted 6 Feb 2012 , 11:08pm
post #5 of 11

It is hard, at times, to say, "No, it can't be done. I won't stake my reputation on a cake that I'll know isn't done properly.", but it's necessary to be firm with people who insist on telling YOU how to do YOUR business.

Rae

AnnieCahill Posted 6 Feb 2012 , 11:19pm
post #6 of 11

If she has her heart set on it, then I would just do something that you know will fit in with that type of cake. If it's a BC transfer or something like that it shouldn't be a problem. But carving, no way Jose!

It's ok to tell the customer no, or offer an alternative if you feel there is one.

zespri Posted 6 Feb 2012 , 11:34pm
post #7 of 11

perhaps suggeste a dulce de leche cake, with dulce de leche filling?

BarbaraM0809 Posted 7 Feb 2012 , 1:18am
post #8 of 11

Dulce de leche I didn't think of that icon_biggrin.gif thanks! It has about the same flavor right? This lady always gets sheet cakes from the mexican store and always tres leches I explained to her that it couldn't be done with a carved 3-d cake covered in fondant. I agree that I'm not going to set my just beginning business on a sure disaster lol...I think she'll be ok with dulce de leche cake though icon_lol.gif

zespri Posted 7 Feb 2012 , 1:34am
post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by BarbaraM0809

Dulce de leche I didn't think of that icon_biggrin.gif thanks! It has about the same flavor right? This lady always gets sheet cakes from the mexican store and always tres leches I explained to her that it couldn't be done with a carved 3-d cake covered in fondant. I agree that I'm not going to set my just beginning business on a sure disaster lol...I think she'll be ok with dulce de leche cake though icon_lol.gif




Yay!

I actually have no idea if they are the same flavour. I have had tres leches cake with dulce de leche filling, but never dulce de leche cake. My friend tells me dulce de leche is beloved by the spanish community, so maybe she will see this as an acceptable alternative. There is a recipe in sky high cakes for one, I've been meaning to try it for ages.

pinkfluffycupcake Posted 9 Feb 2012 , 6:36pm
post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by zespri

Quote:
Originally Posted by BarbaraM0809

Dulce de leche I didn't think of that icon_biggrin.gif thanks! It has about the same flavor right? This lady always gets sheet cakes from the mexican store and always tres leches I explained to her that it couldn't be done with a carved 3-d cake covered in fondant. I agree that I'm not going to set my just beginning business on a sure disaster lol...I think she'll be ok with dulce de leche cake though icon_lol.gif



Yay!

I actually have no idea if they are the same flavour. I have had tres leches cake with dulce de leche filling, but never dulce de leche cake. My friend tells me dulce de leche is beloved by the spanish community, so maybe she will see this as an acceptable alternative. There is a recipe in sky high cakes for one, I've been meaning to try it for ages.




I don't think they are the same flavor, really. Dulce de leche is similar to caramel: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dulce_de_leche. Tres leches cake is soaked in three kinds of milk (typically condensed and evaporated milk and heavy cream, or sometimes coconut milk or cream of coconut): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tres_leches_cake. Maybe you could ask her what it is that she likes so much about the tres leches cake--is it the moistness? That could be accomplished with a simple syrup that won't affect the structural integrity of a regular cake (or the WASC stays pretty moist). Is it the milk flavor? Then maybe you could make a filling that is milky/vanilla-ish in flavor. Good luck! Sounds like quite a challenge.

BarbaraM0809 Posted 10 Feb 2012 , 3:05pm
post #11 of 11

Thanks everyone! We finally settled on Dulce de Leche cake with Dulce de Leche Swiss Meringue Buttercream. I'll be sure to post a pic of the final cake when it's finished icon_biggrin.gif

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