alliecakes82 Posted 1 Feb 2012 , 1:55am
post #1 of

Wedding Cakes:
Wilton's Wedding Serving Chart seems to be the industry standard and one that almost everyone goes by. Am I correct in my assumption?

Party Cakes:
I am a little unsure about this one. Do you use Wilton's Party Serving Chart or Earlene's? I realize that Earlene's is a little more generous. I am always so afraid that I will not have enough cake. The other piece to this is appearance... I needed a 2 tier cake to feed 25-30 people and thought that 6"&9" would look teeny tiny and ended up making 7"&10".

I am just starting out and appreciate all your input.

Thanks,
Allie

12 replies
AmysCakesNCandies Posted 1 Feb 2012 , 2:07am
post #2 of

I use Wilton for wedding & party

Vista Posted 1 Feb 2012 , 2:25am
post #3 of

I use Wilton's wedding chart for all cakes, wedding or special occasion.

CWR41 Posted 1 Feb 2012 , 3:31am
post #4 of

You are correct, the Wilton wedding chart is the industry standard for serving sizes (8 cu. in.) 1"x2"x4" or 2"x2"x2".

mowrys Posted 1 Feb 2012 , 3:47am
post #5 of

I use Earlene Moore's. It makes more sense to me.

TexasSugar Posted 1 Feb 2012 , 3:34pm
post #6 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vista

I use Wilton's wedding chart for all cakes, wedding or special occasion.




Me too!

Make pricing the different cakes so much easier.

BlakesCakes Posted 1 Feb 2012 , 9:26pm
post #7 of

I sort of use the Wilton Party servings chart.............I go by 12 cubic inches of cake per serving--1.5x2x4---for all cakes. I disagree with some of Wilton's serving #s, particularly on oddly shaped pans, so I look at Earlene's chart & take an average.

So far, so good. No one has ever complained about not enough cake.

Rae

tonedna Posted 1 Feb 2012 , 9:46pm
post #8 of

The inustry standard is WIlton but you can use the one that you prefer. Its basically a selling point. If you aren't cutting the cake all the servings guide won't matter if the person
cutting the cake doesn't know any better.

BlakesCakes Posted 1 Feb 2012 , 9:58pm
post #9 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonedna

The inustry standard is WIlton but you can use the one that you prefer. Its basically a selling point. If you aren't cutting the cake all the servings guide won't matter if the person
cutting the cake doesn't know any better.




So very true. It's very important to explain how to cut the cake--even to some professional venues. The purchaser of the cake needs to know this so that if the cake is butchered by the staff, you aren't blamed for providing too little cake.

Rae

tonedna Posted 1 Feb 2012 , 10:18pm

Yes, venues should know how a cake should be cut, specially those who deal with
weddings. For most of the time they do. But in my years of experience I saw a few
people cutting the cakes way to big. And sometimes the person who does the cake
don't have a way to know what will happen when they cut it.

leah_s Posted 1 Feb 2012 , 10:32pm

[quote="tonedna"]The inustry standard is WIlton but you can use the one that you prefer. Its basically a selling point. If you aren't cutting the cake all the servings guide won't matter if the person
cutting the cake doesn't know any better.[/quote]

And that's why you always include a cutting chart on the table with the cake. Discretely tucked behind the cake, of course.

tonedna Posted 1 Feb 2012 , 10:34pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

Quote:
Originally Posted by tonedna

The inustry standard is WIlton but you can use the one that you prefer. Its basically a selling point. If you aren't cutting the cake all the servings guide won't matter if the person
cutting the cake doesn't know any better.



And that's why you always include a cutting chart on the table with the cake. Discretely tucked behind the cake, of course.




lol...Iove the "discretly"

alliecakes82 Posted 2 Feb 2012 , 1:40am

Do you ever get the "I was expecting it to look bigger" comment? I would guess that to most people a 6"&9" tiered cake would look really tiny. Am I totally off base?

Sorry, one other question...
Do you ever ask the customer if they prefer slices on the bigger or smaller side and then give them the size options? or is it mostly that they are looking to the baker for guidance?

A commercial bakery in my area for example will say that a 12" will feed 25-40 people and a 14" will feed something like 40-60 people. If the party really is for 40 people, the customer is essentially deciding on bigger or smaller pieces for their guests.

Allie

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