I Got An Interview!! Tips From Cup Cake Shop Owners?

Business By Bridgette1129 Updated 8 Feb 2012 , 4:15pm by Bridgette1129

Bridgette1129 Posted 25 Jan 2012 , 8:42am
post #1 of 18

Hi!
I am a student in baking school and need a job desperately. A local cupcake shop is hiring and called me for an interview.

This position is for a counter person and I was wondering if you have any tips for my interview?
I'm a HORRIBLE interviewer but I believe I can be more genuine and interview better because it is something I'm very passionate about.

Thanks so much!

17 replies
Bridgette1129 Posted 25 Jan 2012 , 3:49pm
post #2 of 18

I posted this really early this AM so I'm bumping it icon_smile.gif

jason_kraft Posted 25 Jan 2012 , 4:12pm
post #3 of 18

I've interviewed many potential new hires over the years at my day job (not related to baking or decorating). It's always a plus when interviewees come in with some knowledge of the company, what it does, and where they think they could add value, with concrete, quantifiable examples from their work/school/volunteer history to back it up.

Specific to this type of position you should make sure your portfolio is up to date with high quality pictures of your work. Even if the position doesn't involve baking or decorating it would be a plus for the employer to know you could handle that type of work.

I also recommend trying a few mock interviews, your school's career services department should be able to help with this, as well as helping to polish your resume.

KoryAK Posted 25 Jan 2012 , 6:59pm
post #4 of 18

YES please have pictures. Even if it's another art form, this would still tell me that you have an eye for it. Of course, also dress very clean and professionally and don't have any polish on your nails.

dollyandme Posted 25 Jan 2012 , 7:18pm
post #5 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_kraft

I've interviewed many potential new hires over the years at my day job (not related to baking or decorating). It's always a plus when interviewees come in with some knowledge of the company, what it does, and where they think they could add value, with concrete, quantifiable examples from their work/school/volunteer history to back it up.

Specific to this type of position you should make sure your portfolio is up to date with high quality pictures of your work. Even if the position doesn't involve baking or decorating it would be a plus for the employer to know you could handle that type of work.

I also recommend trying a few mock interviews, your school's career services department should be able to help with this, as well as helping to polish your resume.




I agree. Also be yourself...

carmijok Posted 25 Jan 2012 , 7:36pm
post #6 of 18

Be honest...be on time and have a neatly typed resume that has all your work experience and information including photos that show your passion for decorating...even if it's just for a counter position.

Because you'll be dealing directly with customers it's important that you are upbeat in your interview to show them your personality and how you can represent the company.

You don't have to know everything because there is a learning curve on every job and the company will have it's own way of doing business...but do ask them exactly what the job duties are and relay how your experience fits their requirements. And if you lack the work experience tell them about personal experiences that may apply...project your confidence that you are capable of doing whatever job they ask. Tell them you enjoy working with people and would be willing to help out in any area as needed.

If you are a fast learner, tell them. Be eager, not desperate and don't give rambling answers. If you're excited to be there I'm sure they'll see it.

As someone who has hired many people for different types of jobs, it's not always the experience I was looking for...it was an attitude....the willingness to learn and eagerness to grow within the company that would impress me.

Above all, be yourself. And good luck!

Bridgette1129 Posted 25 Jan 2012 , 10:18pm
post #7 of 18

Thank you guys so much!

The nail polish thing is a great idea -- thankfully I don't have any on because they don't allow it at my school.

I didn't know if it would come off wrong to bring pictures even though it's for a counter position but I will definitely bring some.

You guys have been helpful. I'm always so bad at thinking on my feet and describing how I can be an asset.

I will for sure do some mock interviews. For some reason it's more awkward doing one that I know isn't real versus a real one.

mplaidgirl2 Posted 25 Jan 2012 , 10:34pm
post #8 of 18

I interview people all the time for a technology company. And I HATE when people lie about thier ability. You can always see right through them. Just be yourself. If you can't do something just tell them the truth... But of course add in that your a quick learner and have a passion for knowledge. I rather hear that I can teach someone something then having them lie to my face. It starts them off on a bad foot.

jason_kraft Posted 25 Jan 2012 , 10:52pm
post #9 of 18

Also don't forget to turn your cell phone off before the interview. I've had interviewees check their phone (which was on vibrate) during an interview, and one person even texted someone in the middle of answering a question. That's pretty much an instant fail.

If you throw out a cliche like "quick learner" be prepared to back it up with examples, or even better provide your own examples without being prompted.

Absolutely agree with the above poster that being honest and admitting you don't know something is far better than trying to BS your way through an answer.

Bridgette1129 Posted 25 Jan 2012 , 10:56pm
post #10 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_kraft

Also don't forget to turn your cell phone off before the interview. I've had interviewees check their phone (which was on vibrate) during an interview, and one person even texted someone in the middle of answering a question. That's pretty much an instant fail.

If you throw out a cliche like "quick learner" be prepared to back it up with examples, or even better provide your own examples without being prompted.

Absolutely agree with the above poster that being honest and admitting you don't know something is far better than trying to BS your way through an answer.




I can't believe someone would check their phone... If it was my generation, I'm sorry. I'm embarrassed... icon_sad.gif

Also, I can back up cake decorating with the quick learner thing because I haven't had any fails yet, really. I'm not the BEST but I pick it up quick. And pretty much any POS system, etc.

Bridgette1129 Posted 25 Jan 2012 , 10:57pm
post #11 of 18

Mostly at this point I'm just nervous about the competition...

shanter Posted 25 Jan 2012 , 11:08pm
post #12 of 18

At the end of the interview as you are saying "Thank you for interviewing me" also say "I *really* want this job." I have interviewed some people who, after they left, I couldn't tell whether they wanted the job or not.

jason_kraft Posted 25 Jan 2012 , 11:14pm
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by shanter

At the end of the interview as you are saying "Thank you for interviewing me" also say "I *really* want this job." I have interviewed some people who, after they left, I couldn't tell whether they wanted the job or not.



If you couldn't tell that they really wanted the job based on their answers and demeanor during the interview, I don't think explicitly stating it at the end will help. icon_wink.gif

For a customer-focused position like this a more aggressive close ("So when do I start?") might be an advantage, but of course you'll need to gauge the interviewer and make sure not to overdo it. Here are some good tips for ending an interview:
http://career-advice.monster.com/job-interview/interview-preparation/successfully-closing-the-interview/article.aspx

Bridgette1129 Posted 25 Jan 2012 , 11:17pm
post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_kraft

Quote:
Originally Posted by shanter

At the end of the interview as you are saying "Thank you for interviewing me" also say "I *really* want this job." I have interviewed some people who, after they left, I couldn't tell whether they wanted the job or not.


If you couldn't tell that they really wanted the job based on their answers and demeanor during the interview, I don't think explicitly stating it at the end will help. icon_wink.gif

For a customer-focused position like this a more aggressive close ("So when do I start?") might be an advantage, but of course you'll need to gauge the interviewer and make sure not to overdo it. Here are some good tips for ending an interview:
http://career-advice.monster.com/job-interview/interview-preparation/successfully-closing-the-interview/article.aspx




Thanks, Jason. I'll check that out. I'm not very forward because I hate awkward situations. I bet if she is the kind of person to joke that I could joke about it, but I don't want to screw up my first impression. Haha

FromScratchSF Posted 25 Jan 2012 , 11:31pm
post #15 of 18

Don't ever say "I hope to have my own shop someday!!!" or "I just want a few years experience so I can open my own cake business".

That's an instant fail to me.

Bridgette1129 Posted 25 Jan 2012 , 11:38pm
post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by FromScratchSF

Don't ever say "I hope to have my own shop someday!!!" or "I just want a few years experience so I can open my own cake business".

That's an instant fail to me.




I was thinking about that! I don't want to come off wrong. I'm not planning on using her to get experience, I just love cupcakes and need a job so I know I can bring the passion to work everyday and great customers with a smile. Even though I do plan on having mt own business.

mysweets Posted 8 Feb 2012 , 3:21pm
post #17 of 18

How did it go? Did you have your interview yet?

Bridgette1129 Posted 8 Feb 2012 , 4:15pm
post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by mysweets

How did it go? Did you have your interview yet?




The interview went great... however she chose to move an employee from her 2nd location instead of hiring anyone new....

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