Freezing A Decorated Cake

Decorating By SusieQuesCreations Updated 23 Jan 2012 , 3:25pm by BlakesCakes

SusieQuesCreations Posted 20 Jan 2012 , 11:50pm
post #1 of 5

Can you freeze a cake that is already decorated? The cake it a two tier pineapple cake with buttercream icing and fondant decorations/accents. There was a mix-up on the date the cake was needed, so now i have a cake, ready to go, but the party isn't until next Friday. Is there anyway that I can freeze the cake just like it is and it still look good next week? Or am I going to have to just start over with it? Thanks in advance!

4 replies
msulli10 Posted 21 Jan 2012 , 12:25am
post #2 of 5

I don't think the fondant will defrost well once frozen. It might become a gooey mess. You probably can freeze the cake and defrost, then put on new fondant decorations.

Cyn75 Posted 21 Jan 2012 , 12:45am
post #3 of 5

I made a friend a fondant covered cake for her birthday in February and she froze it (covered it in Saran wrap and then wrapped it in a thick plastic bag) and took it out and thawed it out in the fridge in April! She said the cake was still good and that it was really moist and did not notice any condensation!

ycknits Posted 22 Jan 2012 , 7:47am
post #4 of 5

After covering the cake with fondant and decorating, I let it set out at room temperature for several hours or even overnight. Then I put the cake in a box and wrap the box in MANY layers of plastic wrap to make sure it is completely sealed. Then I wrap the box in two layers of aluminum foil and tape to make sure it's sealed up. Then I freeze the cake.

Remove the cake from the freezer the day before serving. Leave it sealed up in the box until a couple of hours before serving. Then carefully open the box and cut away all the packaging and let the cake set out at room temperature for several hours.

Your enemy is condensation. If the cake is not sealed very well, moisture from the air will condense on the cold cake as it thaws. The moisture causes the fondant to soften and droop. If the cake defrosts and comes up to room temperature in the sealed box, there will be no condensation and no damage to the cake.

I never freeze a decorated cake unless I absolutely have to - but it can be done with good results if you're careful.

BlakesCakes Posted 23 Jan 2012 , 3:25pm
post #5 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by ycknits

After covering the cake with fondant and decorating, I let it set out at room temperature for several hours or even overnight. Then I put the cake in a box and wrap the box in MANY layers of plastic wrap to make sure it is completely sealed. Then I wrap the box in two layers of aluminum foil and tape to make sure it's sealed up. Then I freeze the cake.

Remove the cake from the freezer the day before serving. Leave it sealed up in the box until a couple of hours before serving. Then carefully open the box and cut away all the packaging and let the cake set out at room temperature for several hours.

Your enemy is condensation. If the cake is not sealed very well, moisture from the air will condense on the cold cake as it thaws. The moisture causes the fondant to soften and droop. If the cake defrosts and comes up to room temperature in the sealed box, there will be no condensation and no damage to the cake.

I never freeze a decorated cake unless I absolutely have to - but it can be done with good results if you're careful.




Pretty much the same here. I do 2 layers of saran & 1 layer of foil. I've had this process work extremely well.

Rae

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