sandy99 Posted 19 Jan 2012 , 12:01pm
post #1 of

i saw the last episode of cupcakes dc and when they are making the giant cupcake, they use for the buttercream whole eggs. do you know what recipe are they using?

11 replies
metria Posted 19 Jan 2012 , 6:52pm
post #2 of

from a brief google search, it seems like you can make French buttercream with egg yolks or the whole egg.

i found a very nice page about buttercream on King Arthur Flour's website:
http://www.kingarthurflour.com/blog/2011/01/04/the-beautiful-side-of-baking-blissful-buttercream/

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French: The method is the same as for Italian buttercream, but whole eggs or egg yolks are used instead of whites. VERY rich, and if youre not coloring the frosting, a very pale golden color. French buttercream has a lower melting point, because of the extra fat from the egg yolks.


scp1127 Posted 19 Jan 2012 , 7:43pm
post #3 of

French buttercream is the method. The whole egg method is not as popular as the yolk recipe. This is my frosting of choice at my bakery. It is very rich and accepts flavors, liqueurs, and fruits well. It's neighbor, IMBC, is not as rich and make a better blank canvas if richness is not the preference. So I use IMBC for more subtle frostings and FBC base for ones that need to be bolder.

metria Posted 19 Jan 2012 , 8:46pm
post #4 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by scp1127

French buttercream is the method. The whole egg method is not as popular as the yolk recipe. This is my frosting of choice at my bakery. It is very rich and accepts flavors, liqueurs, and fruits well. It's neighbor, IMBC, is not as rich and make a better blank canvas if richness is not the preference. So I use IMBC for more subtle frostings and FBC base for ones that need to be bolder.




good to know! makes total sense with how you put it. i've only tried making French once and i did like it. i'll try it more often with those suggestions icon_smile.gif

auzzi Posted 19 Jan 2012 , 10:30pm
post #5 of

French Buttercream can be made using egg yolks only, egg yolks and whole eggs, or just whole eggs.

To make the buttercream,
1. Yolks only: make a Pâte á bombe - boiled sugar syrup poured over whipped egg yolks. Butter is then beaten into the cooled mixture.
2. When using egg yolks/whole eggs, or just the whole eggs, use either the boiled syrup [Italian meringue method] or beaten over simmering water [swiss meringue method] ..

It is softer and richer than the buttercreams made using egg-white meringue. It is also yellow as it includes yolks. It breaks down quicker even though it is a cooked frosting due to the presence of the yolks.

Flour Frosting [faux "whipped" cream frosting] is sometimes called French Buttercream.

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sandy99 Posted 20 Jan 2012 , 12:01am
post #6 of

int he video it saws that when they put whole eggs in the mixer there is already in there something that it has become fluffy.
is there any recipe to explain that?

sandy99 Posted 20 Jan 2012 , 10:39am
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anyone?

FromScratchSF Posted 20 Jan 2012 , 8:22pm
post #8 of

I don't think they were making French buttercream or otherwise. They don't make that type of icing at Georgetown Cupcakes, and I don't know why they'd go to the expense of doing it on the burnt-to-cinders yet still raw "one ton cupcake".

I think they cut away to someone mixing batter, not making frosting.

cupadeecakes Posted 20 Jan 2012 , 8:39pm
post #9 of

I use a French BC everyday. It is great with vanilla, but as said above even better with flavor in it. I add preserves or liquers as well as other extracts. Crushed oreo's make it heavenly! To start the recipe I add 7 whole eggs to the stand mixer, with whip attachment on high, and whip the fool out of it until my sugar is cooked. It will make something that may look like a batter. All of the air bubbles in the eggs will insulate the raw eggs and keep them from turning to scrambled eggs when slowly adding the hot sugar syrup. If the eggs aren't very whipped, it will ruin. It's not hard at all, you just have to start them first, and by the time the sugar gets to "firm ball" your eggs will be ready. After sitting a couple of days at room temp, I sometimes have to re whip it but it never "breaks down" to me.

sandy99 Posted 21 Jan 2012 , 1:41am

could you please sare your recipe with me?

scp1127 Posted 21 Jan 2012 , 5:55am

One note about FBC: It will deteriorate a little with over-mixing after the sugar stage. IMBC can be left alone and periodically checked for proper temp. But FBC will start looking like Play-Doh> It doesn't hurt the flavor, but it will noticeably decrease the volume.

This is my recipe. Use directions for IMBC. This recipe is always 1.5x by me for a 9 inch 3 layer cake.

6 lg egg yolks
1 c sugar
1/2 c water
2 c unsalted butter

Sugar to 238 degrees. When it is finished, 1 tsp of very hot or boiling water will make this recipe shine beautifully.

I use a similar recipe for one cake with the sugar slightly different, so a tiny adjustment is ok.

sandy99 Posted 21 Jan 2012 , 11:17am

thank you so much i will try it. but i want to try also one with all eggs

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