teacheramanda Posted 13 Jan 2012 , 9:32pm
post #1 of

I have a request for this cake and they don't want fondant- how in the world do you get those lines with buttercream? Is it possible?!
LL

13 replies
ButRCream Posted 13 Jan 2012 , 9:39pm
post #2 of

Some type of decorating comb perhaps? That would be my best guess. Crumb coat the cake, then ice the cake with buttercream nice and thick and use a textured comb.

hope22023 Posted 13 Jan 2012 , 9:43pm
post #3 of

I recently did a wedding cake with this same technique. I went out and bought decorating combs.... didnt work for me! What I ended up doing was icing the cakes in SMBC, using my small spatula pressed lightly into the icing and turned cake on turntable to make first indentation. I started 2nd line right above the ridge left from the first. I let the icing harden in the fridge for awhile then smoothed out the lines with my fingers. Worked well!

jgifford Posted 13 Jan 2012 , 9:48pm
post #4 of

I saw a tutorial for this on someone's blog - - I'm sorry, I don't remember who it was. She made her own "comb" from cardboard. Don't know how food safe that was, but she was able to cut the grooves deeper than normal. HTH

Unlimited Posted 13 Jan 2012 , 10:59pm
post #5 of

That IS a buttercream cake, and it's not combed. It's done with a petal tip, like #104, and each progressive line is piped all the way around. See the few white lines that are randomly added between the colored lines? You can't get that result using a comb.

grandmomof1 Posted 13 Jan 2012 , 11:16pm
post #6 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unlimited

That IS a buttercream cake, and it's not combed. It's done with a petal tip, like #104, and each progressive line is piped all the way around. See the few white lines that are randomly added between the colored lines? You can't get that result using a comb.




I agree with "unlimited." When I looked at the cake, I knew it was buttercream and I knew it had to be piped because of the white line incorporated on each tier. There is no way you could get this by using the comb.

teacheramanda Posted 14 Jan 2012 , 4:06am
post #7 of

Thanks! I guess I'll start working on my steady hand with a petal tip! If anyone fins a tutorial I'd love to see!!

cheatize Posted 14 Jan 2012 , 4:36am
post #8 of

No tutorial, but I bet a laser level would help a lot with piping all those straight lines.

DeniseNH Posted 14 Jan 2012 , 6:13am
post #9 of

wilton has a new guage that you can use. You impress tiny holes as a guide to keep lines straight.

AnnieCahill Posted 14 Jan 2012 , 2:13pm

It's definitely piped on. You can either use a petal tip or the smooth side of the basket weave tip.

Annie

Loucinda Posted 15 Jan 2012 , 2:16am

It is easier to do if you have someone else to *spin* the turntable while you are piping the rows of icing. Make sure they keep turning it at an even speed! (I made a cake similar to this a few months ago).

grandmomof1 Posted 19 Jan 2012 , 5:03am

I had originally said this cake was buttercream, but I saw a video on theknot.com today with a cake very similar (if not that cake). The girl doing the video said it was fondant. Now I am at a loss.

docofthedead Posted 19 Jan 2012 , 5:30am

It struck me as buttercream at first..I did just happen to run across a varitey of these combs on e b a y. I am not sure if I can give you the name of the store, but if you PM me I will send it to you.
Good luck!

AnnieCahill Posted 19 Jan 2012 , 12:12pm

The design can be done either way. If it were me, I would practice on a dummy or smaller cake and get the feel for it, and then decide if it's something you want to do.

Annie

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