Selling Fondant Decorations On Etsy From Oklahoma?

Business By kendra_83 Updated 13 Jan 2012 , 9:15pm by kendra_83

kendra_83 Posted 11 Jan 2012 , 3:43pm
post #1 of 6

Does anyone know the steps involved to sell pre-made fondant decorations online? I live in Oklahoma (no cottage food law), however I have access to a commercial kitchen. Does pre-made store-bought fondant even fall into the category of food? If all I'd be doing is manipulating something that has already been inspected then I wouldn't really be making something edible. I'm simply taking something edible and making it into a decoration, right? I'd like to get started so any advice would be appreciated!

5 replies
kakeladi Posted 11 Jan 2012 , 4:15pm
post #2 of 6

the only thing I know is once there is wireing involved, no matter what ingredients or is made, it no longer is considered edible.
So if you are making wired flowers/corsages etc they would not be considered food.

kendra_83 Posted 11 Jan 2012 , 4:26pm
post #3 of 6

I hadn't planned on using any wire, just pre-made toppers and decorations for cakes and cupcakes, however that might be a good idea.

scp1127 Posted 12 Jan 2012 , 11:54am
post #4 of 6

If you do not make them inedible and be clear to your customers that this is not a food product, then it must pass FDA codes which are the highest standards if you choose to ship over state lines. Most commercial kitchens will pass the building requirements. After that it would be your completion of the application. But an approved kitchen is the first step. If it is edible, it is subject to all food laws.

The most profitable way would be to use the wires or any other product that would make them inedible.Then you have no production or selling issues.

MimiFix Posted 12 Jan 2012 , 1:46pm
post #5 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by kendra_83

If all I'd be doing is manipulating something that has already been inspected then I wouldn't really be making something edible. I'm simply taking something edible and making it into a decoration, right?




Sorry, but no. This might work if the wrap stays on the food. For instance, you purchase a case of individually wrapped items and resell in smaller quantity without disturbing the wrapper. Otherwise, handling the food product directly moves you into being a food-handler subject to applicable regulations.

kendra_83 Posted 13 Jan 2012 , 9:15pm
post #6 of 6

Maybe I could just say something like, "although made from an edible medium and non-toxic, these products should be used only for decoration purposes and not consumed." I was just wondering how all these other people are getting around it. It seems like a huge hassle. I ordered some just to see how they're packaged.

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