How Do I.... Scale Up?

Baking By me_me1 Updated 7 Jan 2012 , 6:43pm by me_me1

me_me1 Posted 6 Jan 2012 , 2:26pm
post #1 of 7

Hi there,

I have been trawling the net looking for a good formula to use for scaling up cake recipes. One formula I've found takes the size of the pan you want to use (for me this would be 14") and the size of the pan your original recipe uses (for me this is 6"). The formula is 14" divided by 6 which gives you 2.33. So you times each ingredient amount by 2.33.

The thing is though, I've doubled this recipe before and it gives me enough batter for an 8" tin but there will be nowhere near enough for a 14" tin.

Can anyone help me find a failsafe formula?

Thanks for your help! icon_smile.gif

6 replies
elisaber Posted 6 Jan 2012 , 3:33pm
post #2 of 7

You're going to have to work with the pan VOLUME to figure this out. For round pans you need to know the radius (diameter/2) and the height of the pan (2"? 3"?).

The formula to figure out the volume of the different round pans is as follows: Volume of a cylinder =(3,14 x radius x radius) x height. So, for a 6" pan with 3" sides it will be:

(3,14x3x3)x3 = 84,78 square inches

For the 14": (3,14x7x7)x3 = 461,58 square inches.

Divide the largest by the smallest, and you'll get 5,44. So you need 5,44 times more of all the ingredients to fill the 14" than you do the 6" if they're both 3" tall. Adjust accordingly for say 2" pans.

I know it's technical and looks a bit nerdy, but that's how you do the scaling for pan volume icon_smile.gif For square pans you need to find the formula for cube volume.

CWR41 Posted 6 Jan 2012 , 3:46pm
post #3 of 7

You're sort of on the right track, but you need to use the volume instead of the diameter.

6" volume = 113.04 cu. in.
14" volume = 615.44 cu. in.
615.44 divided by
113.04 equals 5.44

Take whatever measurement you use for your 6" and multiply it by 5.44 to get enough for your 14".

Metria's cake calculator (by volume) can help with this:
http://shinymetalobjects.net/cake/calculator/cakulator.cgi?.defaults=Reset&option=3&option=Select+Cakulator&servingSize=Continue&serving_width=1&serving_length=2&serving_height=4&.cgifields=group_sheet&.cgifields=group_square&.cgifields=group_round

But, if you have the Wilton chart, you don't need to know any of this. The 6" pan holds 2 cups of batter, and the 14" pan holds 10 cups. Two times five equals 10.

http://www.wilton.com/cakes/making-cakes/baking-wedding-cake-2-inch-pans.cfm

imagenthatnj Posted 6 Jan 2012 , 4:36pm
post #4 of 7

We all arrive at the same amount of batter needed. But maybe this is a better explanation.

THE VOLUME OF A CYLINDER = Pi x (radius times 2) x height

Pi = 3.142
Radius of your pan is half of the pan's diameter. So if your cake pan is 14 inches, the radius is half of that measure = 7

I'm assuming the height of the pan is 3"


VOLUME OF YOUR 14" PAN

Pi x (radius times 2) x height

3.142 x 49 x 3 = 461.874

That's the volume of your 14" pan.


VOLUME OF THE 6" PAN

3.142 x 9 x 3 = 84.85

That's the volume of your 6" pan


NOW DIVIDE THE BIGGEST ONE BY THE SMALLER ONE:

461.874 divided by 84.85 = 5.44

YOU NEED 5.44 times the amount of batter to use in the 14" pan.

Here are the sites. You can actually manipulate the cylinder on the first site (too bad it only goes down to a height of 6").

http://www.mathopenref.com/cylindervolume.html

http://www.cocoandme.com/2010/10/12/cake-pan-size-conversion-the-formula/

KoryAK Posted 6 Jan 2012 , 6:23pm
post #5 of 7

I still think that cubic inches is a better measurement to get used to using, it will be needed if you are needing to scale say from a 6 x 2" deep to an 8 x 3" deep

imagenthatnj Posted 6 Jan 2012 , 6:54pm
post #6 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by KoryAK

I still think that cubic inches is a better measurement to get used to using, it will be needed if you are needing to scale say from a 6 x 2" deep to an 8 x 3" deep




Same formulas, just call the end result "cubic inches"

Here's a calculator just so that you don't have to do the math. But it's good to know the formula when you don't have this.

http://www.powerzoneequipment.com/cylinder-volume-formula.asp?Description=Cylinder+Volume+Formula

me_me1 Posted 7 Jan 2012 , 6:43pm
post #7 of 7

You are all amazing. Thank you so much!!

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