Confusion Over Buttercream Or Fondant

Decorating By disastrophe Updated 18 Jan 2012 , 2:58am by disastrophe

disastrophe Posted 5 Jan 2012 , 8:08pm
post #1 of 34

Recently a woman asked me about making a cake similar to one she saw on the weddingbee boards:

http://boards.weddingbee.com/topic/butter-cream-frosting-cakes-anyone-else-only-using-buttercream

She likes the one half way down the page with the ruffles and pink frillies (post number 17). The problem is, she is insisting on buttercream only, with no fondant - but to me, it looks like it was made with fondant. Part of the reason why she thinks it can be done is because on the weddingbee board, the poster of the picture said that these were buttercream only cakes.

By the way, I recognize this cake because it's from Maisie Fantaisie:

http://www.maisiefantaisie.co.uk/wedding-cakes.html

At the top it says "Iced Cakes" and all the cakes below it look like they used fondant. I'm afraid if I show her this page it will only add to the confusion!

So what do you think? Can this be done with buttercream? I'm thinking that I should just tell her that I can't do it if I can't use fondant.

33 replies
LeeBD Posted 5 Jan 2012 , 8:28pm
post #2 of 34

I zoomed in on the photos and they both look like a rolled icing. I'm no expert on buttercream
and I know you can make a "frill" look, but that perfect?

QTCakes1 Posted 5 Jan 2012 , 8:46pm
post #3 of 34

Yup, you can do frill with buttercream and it look that good. There is a decorator on here, she doesn't post, who's cakes look like fondant, but they are buttercream. I admire that great smooth butercream skill. And that frill cake looks like buttercream to me.

CWR41 Posted 5 Jan 2012 , 8:59pm
post #4 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by disastrophe

So what do you think? Can this be done with buttercream?




I don't think it's buttercream (at least not piped buttercream)... the ruffles are too thin and you'd see a line opposite the ruffle where the ruffle tip would end if it was piped with buttercream. The flowers are also too thin to be buttercream and would be too heavy to stay upright in those positions.

It could very well be a rolled buttercream... I think that could work.

KateLS Posted 5 Jan 2012 , 9:03pm
post #5 of 34

Description next to cake:
'Frill' wedding cake : Madagascar vanilla bean cake, vanilla
buttercream, Fortnum's violet jelly, handmade sugar ruffles."

Notice "handmade sugar ruffles". This is fondant. I'm sure there is buttercream underneath.

Rose_N_Crantz Posted 5 Jan 2012 , 9:06pm
post #6 of 34

On the second link you posted, the description on the cake does say "hand made sugar ruffles" ie, fondant. You could pipe them using a 104 (petal) tip, fat end against the cake and just wiggle the bag as you do a constant pressure and spin the turn table. But I would tell her that it's not going to look exactly like the picture. You might not be able to get the frills that thin. It's like trying to copy a watercolor painting but using acrylic paint. You could follow the same pattern, but it's just not going to look the same as fondant.

Rose_N_Crantz Posted 5 Jan 2012 , 9:09pm
post #7 of 34

And if she is putting up a fight, go ahead and show her that second link. Show her that the person that actually did that cake (not just posted a picture of it on a wedding board) is saying the frills are done with fondant. I don't think it would confuse her more, it would only clarify.

KateLS Posted 5 Jan 2012 , 9:15pm
post #8 of 34

I think part of the confusion is also with the term "Iced". Fondant is considered a form of icing.

disastrophe Posted 5 Jan 2012 , 9:21pm
post #9 of 34

Thanks for the input everybody! I'll point her to the page that has more details about the cake, tell her if she wants it done in buttercream it won't look exactly the same, and then I'll just wait to see what she decides.

Unlimited Posted 5 Jan 2012 , 9:41pm
post #10 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rose_N_Crantz

You could pipe them using a 104 (petal) tip, fat end against the cake and just wiggle the bag as you do a constant pressure and spin the turn table. But I would tell her that it's not going to look exactly like the picture. You might not be able to get the frills that thin.




I agree. It could be done in buttercream, yet with a very noticeable differencedefinitely not exactly like the photo.

To see a video of ruffles being piped (like Rose described above"wiggle the bag", or rather"twist your wrist" technique), click on either link in my signatureit'll take you to the 127D ruffle video. I used the 127D "Giant Rose" tip with only two ruffles on each tier (one ruffle extending toward the bottom, and the other ruffle towards the top), but you could easily build up multiple rows from the bottom using a smaller tip like #104. BTW, the cake design in the video is on the Wilton site.

auzzi Posted 5 Jan 2012 , 10:24pm
post #11 of 34

Fondant icing is the UK term. Fondant is a poured icing[liquid] used mainly on small cakes like petit fours etc.

Handmade sugar ruffles does not necessarily mean ruffles made purely out of rolled fondant. It may be one of the various types of sugarpaste that can be made up/purchased.

Have you indicated to the client the cost of the cake that she wishes to have copied ? £725 ~ $1120 ...

KateLS Posted 5 Jan 2012 , 10:30pm
post #12 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by auzzi

Fondant icing is the UK term. Fondant is a poured icing[liquid] used mainly on small cakes like petit fours etc.

Handmade sugar ruffles does not necessarily mean ruffles made purely out of rolled fondant. It may be one of the various types of sugarpaste that can be made up/purchased.

Have you indicated to the client the cost of the cake that she wishes to have copied ? £725 ~ $1120 ...




True, true!

Norasmom Posted 5 Jan 2012 , 10:32pm
post #13 of 34

Hard to believe it's NOT fondant.

disastrophe Posted 5 Jan 2012 , 11:30pm
post #14 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by auzzi


Have you indicated to the client the cost of the cake that she wishes to have copied ? £725 ~ $1120 ...




No, but she'll see that soon enough I suppose! She wants a smaller cake and with ribbon bows instead of the big pink round things. Of course, Maisie Fantaisie can charge what they do because their work is amazing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by auzzi


Fondant icing is the UK term. Fondant is a poured icing[liquid] used mainly on small cakes like petit fours etc.
...




I had wondered about that. Is it the same terminology in Australia?

KateLS Posted 6 Jan 2012 , 2:03am
post #15 of 34

This is the list of different Icings on the Wilton website. All icing.

http://www.wilton.com/decorating/icing/icing-chart.cfm

Annabakescakes Posted 6 Jan 2012 , 4:32am
post #16 of 34

My vote is that there is no way it is buttercream! It is rolled, whether it be fondant, gum paste, Mexican paste, flower paste or a 50/50 blend.

LoveMeSomeCake615 Posted 6 Jan 2012 , 5:11am
post #17 of 34

That is not buttercream. I don't care how good you are, I don't think anyone can make bc look exactly like that.

Not to say that technique can't be done in bc, just that it won't look exactly like that, as people have already said!

It's always fun to read those wedding bee boards and see all the misinformation being passed around.

Annabakescakes Posted 6 Jan 2012 , 5:48am
post #18 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by LoveMeSomeCake615

That is not buttercream. I don't care how good you are, I don't think anyone can make bc look exactly like that.

Not to say that technique can't be done in bc, just that it won't look exactly like that, as people have already said!

It's always fun to read those wedding bee boards and see all the misinformation being passed around.J




Oh great, another way to waste time on the Internet, just what I needed! icon_biggrin.gif

FromScratchSF Posted 6 Jan 2012 , 7:56am
post #19 of 34

That is fondant. But you can get a very similar look with buttercream:

Image

One of my cakes, SMBC. The flowers are fabric. I chose to overlap the ruffles that much with a 103 but I was originally going to use a larger rose tip and make them farther apart. Changed my mind at the last minute.

FromScratchSF Posted 6 Jan 2012 , 8:01am
post #20 of 34

I also love how the person that posted those photos on weddingbee classified those cakes as "simple". HA! Simple. Big LOL.

Annabakescakes Posted 6 Jan 2012 , 8:57am
post #21 of 34

Gorgeous!

auzzi Posted 6 Jan 2012 , 10:39pm
post #22 of 34

Sugarpaste [original name] = soft white icing [general name] = plastic icing [general name] = RTR or ready-to-roll [modern commercial name] = rolled fondant [acquired modern name]

Fondant in commercial-speak, is the boiled sugar mixture that goes in the centre of confectionery or re-worked as a poured icing [or fondant icing]. The trend of just referring to rolled fondant as fondant creates confusion as the name "fondant" is already taken by another product.

LoveMeSomeCake615 Posted 7 Jan 2012 , 12:25am
post #23 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by FromScratchSF

I also love how the person that posted those photos on weddingbee classified those cakes as "simple". HA! Simple. Big LOL.




I know, right???

Your cake is gorgeous! That must have taken you hours!

LoveMeSomeCake615 Posted 7 Jan 2012 , 12:28am
post #24 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annabakescakes



Oh great, another way to waste time on the Internet, just what I needed! icon_biggrin.gif




Haha, you're welcome! icon_wink.gif

Have you discovered Pinterest yet? Now that's a time waster!

costumeczar Posted 7 Jan 2012 , 1:37am
post #25 of 34

Good lord, that's fondant or gumpaste on the original cake, there's no question.

FromScratch, how cramped up was your hand after piping all of those ruffles? It looks good, by the way. Much faster than layering them all on, I'll bet, even with a cramping hand.

costumeczar Posted 7 Jan 2012 , 1:39am
post #26 of 34

I also have to say that I find it interesting that even though we know people's real names on here we'll still use their screen names. Kind of a weird forum posting etiquette, I guess. I don't care if people use my real name, though. Just saying.

wafawafa Posted 7 Jan 2012 , 6:07pm
post #27 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by FromScratchSF

That is fondant. But you can get a very similar look with buttercream:

Image

One of my cakes, SMBC. The flowers are fabric. I chose to overlap the ruffles that much with a 103 but I was originally going to use a larger rose tip and make them farther apart. Changed my mind at the last minute.



Waw is tis can be done with SMBC ? Can SMBC hold its shape ? i only use indys recipe with is perfect in piping and it does hold it shape very well , but if SMBC can hold its shape like that IWill go for it

KateLS Posted 17 Jan 2012 , 4:50am
post #28 of 34

Hey! I was just reading another post with pictures of tips and saw these PME tips...

https://www.knightsbridgepme.co.uk/IMG/Latest/L/_DSF3130.jpg

Don't you think the third one could give a similar ruffle, if the customer is determined to have it in buttercream?

I mean, it'll still be different, but still the same basic idea. =)

costumeczar Posted 17 Jan 2012 , 11:40am
post #29 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by KateLS

Hey! I was just reading another post with pictures of tips and saw these PME tips...

https://www.knightsbridgepme.co.uk/IMG/Latest/L/_DSF3130.jpg

Don't you think the third one could give a similar ruffle, if the customer is determined to have it in buttercream?

I mean, it'll still be different, but still the same basic idea. =)




Those would probably work...It does make my hand hurt to think of piping all that.

CarolLee Posted 17 Jan 2012 , 1:32pm
post #30 of 34

There are some tips that can be ordered "special order" that comes close to this with practice. I think one of them is .... tip #040. Small ones and larger ones. Just a thought.

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