Stacking Multiple Tiers Question

Decorating By FondantDreams Updated 5 Jan 2012 , 12:54am by FondantDreams

FondantDreams Posted 4 Jan 2012 , 10:01pm
post #1 of 10




This youtube video is of Edna (forget her last name) and she is one of my favorites to watch and learn from and in this video she is making a 4 tiered wedding cake and shows how to insert the supports/dowels. I thought that in order to support each tier and prevent the top tiers from squishing the bottom that a piece of cardboard needed to go inbetween (or plastic)? She just has dowels so I am rather confused.

Could somebody please help me to understand this?

Also, I can see the width of the cakes she has made but are those 2 seperate cakes HIGH? Is it typical and usual to tort and fill a wedding cake, each cake for each tier. Does this make sense? I need to learn this, people are starting to ask if I do wedding cakes and I am pretty scared because I don't know what I am doing just yet.

TIA!!!!

9 replies
CWR41 Posted 4 Jan 2012 , 10:35pm
post #2 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by FondantDreams

I thought that in order to support each tier and prevent the top tiers from squishing the bottom that a piece of cardboard needed to go inbetween (or plastic)? She just has dowels so I am rather confused.

Could somebody please help me to understand this?




Without watching the video, I think it's safe to assume that each tier is on its own board, therefore, there IS a cardboard in between.

Quote:
Originally Posted by FondantDreams

Also, I can see the width of the cakes she has made but are those 2 seperate cakes HIGH? Is it typical and usual to tort and fill a wedding cake, each cake for each tier. Does this make sense?




Again, without watching the video, tiers are typically two 2" tall layers. You can torte and fill each layer, if you choose (or not)... it's a personal preference.

FondantDreams Posted 4 Jan 2012 , 11:37pm
post #3 of 10

she showed how she seperated the cake from the board before stacking and I got rather confused and worried but she's Edna LOL So I had wondered if the cardboard dowels she used in great numbers really work at replacing the cake boards? I'd be scared!

CWR41 Posted 4 Jan 2012 , 11:45pm
post #4 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by FondantDreams

she showed how she seperated the cake from the board before stacking and I got rather confused and worried but she's Edna LOL So I had wondered if the cardboard dowels she used in great numbers really work at replacing the cake boards? I'd be scared!




No way!!! Each tier is on its own circle the same size as the tier.

(It may be temporarily on another board also, just for shuffling around, but there's no way that dowels won't pierce right through cake.)

FondantDreams Posted 5 Jan 2012 , 12:12am
post #5 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by CWR41

Quote:
Originally Posted by FondantDreams

she showed how she seperated the cake from the board before stacking and I got rather confused and worried but she's Edna LOL So I had wondered if the cardboard dowels she used in great numbers really work at replacing the cake boards? I'd be scared!



No way!!! Each tier is on its own circle the same size as the tier.

(It may be temporarily on another board also, just for shuffling around, but there's no way that dowels won't pierce right through cake.)




That's what I thought! I will have to look at it again but she even has the words printed on the screen of each step she is doing and in one part it actually says that she is separating the cake and the board before she places the next tier on the previous tier. It certainly got me wondering how she was doing that. She HAS to have one!

MacsMom Posted 5 Jan 2012 , 12:41am
post #6 of 10

No!! It says she is separating the BUTTERCREAM from the board, not the cake. The cake is on it's own circle. She places her cake (with it's own circle) on top of another board to ice it, so you can transfer your tier into the fridge easily, without making a mess of buttercream and damaging your cake.

I love Edna, too. icon_biggrin.gif

SweetSouthernBakery Posted 5 Jan 2012 , 12:41am
post #7 of 10

If you look at about 5 min 30 sec then there is a scrolling dialog that says that she has it on a cake board that is wrapped with wax paper on both sides. So yes, she does have it on a board. HTH

FondantDreams Posted 5 Jan 2012 , 12:43am
post #8 of 10

Oh good! Whew! I knew I had to have missed something and apparently I did. Thank you for clearing that one up for me and what a great idea! I am going to watch this one again; it's certainly going into my favorites!!!

MacsMom Posted 5 Jan 2012 , 12:50am
post #9 of 10

...so yes, each tier must be placed on it's own circle before stacking.

And yes, you can either cut each 2" cake in half and fill, so you end up with 3 filling layers and 4 cake layers, or you can use 1 layer of filling in between two 2" cakes.

Most cakes these days have various tier heights, using only one 2" cake for shorter cakes which would be torted with one filling layer, or three 2" cakes that can have 3 or 5 filling layers.

Any cake tier that is taller than 6" (three 2" cakes) should actually consist of two cakes that are stacked directly on top of each other (with supports and a cake circle), then iced to conceal the separation. So a very tall 8" tier would actually be two 4" cakes on top of each other.

FondantDreams Posted 5 Jan 2012 , 12:54am
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacsMom

...so yes, each tier must be placed on it's own circle before stacking.

And yes, you can either cut each 2" cake in half and fill, so you end up with 3 filling layers and 4 cake layers, or you can use 1 layer of filling in between two 2" cakes.

Most cakes these days have various tier heights, using only one 2" cake for shorter cakes which would be torted with one filling layer, or three 2" cakes that can have 3 or 5 filling layers.

Any cake tier that is taller than 6" (three 2" cakes) should actually consist of two cakes that are stacked directly on top of each other (with supports and a cake circle), then iced to conceal the separation. So a very tall 8" tier would actually be two 4" cakes on top of each other.




Wow, thank you for this great advice!!! I needed to know this and you've helped me.

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