CakeItGood Posted 2 Jan 2012 , 12:43am
post #1 of

Hoping someone out there can give me some insight on using the SPS system to offset square cakes. I am doing a 4 tier wedding cake next weekend (my first!) and wanted to stagger the squares. However, when I place the SPS plate on top of the pan size for the tiers, it seems like the holes for the dowels will be too close to the edge, like about an inch from the edge. Will that place too much stress on the edges, could the cake crack or crumble? I am using the 3d Durable Cake recipe, and the sizes are 14"/ 10" / 8" / 6". It just seemed too close to me, am I worrying to much?

The sizes can be switched around, the cake is for my sister. I have also thought about doing a 5 tier, but all my cakes so far have only been 3 tier and I don't want to go in over my head. Then again, using SPS, and the upside down frosting technique for level cakes, it would probably be fine. Needs to feed appx 200 people, 10-20 servings over or under is fine. Top tier is not counted in the servings as it will be gluten free for bride/groom. Thank you for any insight you can provide!

5 replies
CWR41 Posted 2 Jan 2012 , 2:28am
post #2 of

It won't work. Your sizes are incorrect to offset. (You could slightly twist to stairstep, but not offset.)

First of all, Single Plate Separators don't use dowels--they have legs.

Your 6" square won't fit on an 8" square--you need 8.49 inches.
Your 8" square won't fit on a 10" square--you need 11.31 inches.
Your 10" square won't fit on a 14" square--you need 14.14 inches.

To get approximately 200 servings, and make it offset stacked, you'd need to make a 16"x11"x7"x4" square tiered cake to serve 212 (220 including the top tier).

Here are the right angle measurements if you want to consider other sizes:
4" 5.66
5" 7.07
6" 8.49
7" 9.9
8" 11.31
9" 12.73
10" 14.14
11" 15.56
12" 16.97
13" 18.38
14" 19.8
15" 21.21
16" 22.63
17" 24.04
18" 25.46

PeggyMichel Posted 3 Jan 2012 , 1:52am
post #3 of

Hi, I have done a number of offset square cakes using SPS. First thing to consider is that you need a three inch difference between each layer: 6", 9", 12" for example. Then when I am ready to stack, I don't use square plates, I use round ones a bit smaller than the layer itself. This enables me to turn the layer easily into the exact position I want. Once I put on a bottom border, it doesn't move a bit. You know sometimes we like to tweek the set up a bit to get the positioning just right, and this way you can.

CWR41 Posted 3 Jan 2012 , 3:29am
post #4 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeggyMichel

First thing to consider is that you need a three inch difference between each layer: 6", 9", 12" for example.




Eight inch tiers and larger require more than a three inch increase to offset stack upon or else the corners will overhang off of the tier(s) below.

LadyPol Posted 12 Jan 2012 , 4:04am
post #5 of

Ok, I am freaking out now ... planning on a 5-tier square wedding cake for March, stack in "spiral" or off set ... and was planning on 2" differences. Another thread said this would work. This thread is saying no. Now I don't know what to do, LOL! (I also use SPS)

CWR41 Posted 12 Jan 2012 , 5:27am
post #6 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by LadyPol

Ok, I am freaking out now ... planning on a 5-tier square wedding cake for March, stack in "spiral" or off set ... and was planning on 2" differences. Another thread said this would work. This thread is saying no. Now I don't know what to do, LOL! (I also use SPS)




Stack your pans (or cardboards or pieces of paper) and see for yourself what you get.

Where's the thread that said this would work?

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