I Need To Know The In's And Out's Of Doing A Wedding Cake

Business By FondantDreams Updated 31 Dec 2011 , 3:51pm by FondantDreams

FondantDreams Posted 28 Dec 2011 , 10:48pm
post #1 of 16

I've been approached TWICE in 18 hours by two different women asking me about doing a cake for their wedding. Currently they are wanting a tasting but are asking the typical questions as well. I'm entirely new to this and need to know everything I can to be as professional as I can be to get these new clients. Can you help me please?

I also have a potential large event for a gold cup race in May, how does this differ from a wedding?

15 replies
FondantDreams Posted 30 Dec 2011 , 1:55pm
post #2 of 16

Does't anybody know how to do a wedding? I need information ASAP please! icon_smile.gif

Texas_Rose Posted 30 Dec 2011 , 7:47pm
post #3 of 16

I think you're not getting replies because your question is too general.

What are you trying to figure out? What to do at a tasting, what to say in a contract, how to construct a wedding cake, what to charge, etc?

AZCouture Posted 30 Dec 2011 , 7:54pm
post #4 of 16

Cake is cake is cake. There just happens to be a woman in a white dress cutting this one.

costumeczar Posted 30 Dec 2011 , 11:54pm
post #5 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZCouture

Cake is cake is cake. There just happens to be a woman in a white dress cutting this one.




...Who will be really, really pissed off if the cake falls over because it wasn't constructed right.

Start on Youtube and find some "how to stack wedding cakes" videos if you're trying to learn how to do that. If you're just trying to get starte in weddings in general that's an entirely different problem.

AZCouture Posted 31 Dec 2011 , 12:39am
post #6 of 16

True, but looking at OP's gallery, I would say she has a handle on tiered cakes already. Personally I would brush up on the final smoothed product, but honestly....cake is cake is cake. icon_biggrin.gif

carmijok Posted 31 Dec 2011 , 1:19am
post #7 of 16

Cake is not 'cake' when it's a 4-tier topsy- turvy buttercream cake and 108 degrees outside. That's when my wedding caketastrophe happened. And it looks like the OP has only stacked 2 tiers...small ones at that so I'd say she probably has lots of questions.
You need to know how many will be served. Then, based on the design the bride wishes you need to figure out to make it happen. You really need to be more specific in your questions to get more concise answers. Many factors affect the outcome, not the least of which is delivery and the question of whether you will need to stack on site or before. BIG consideration is getting the right support system in play and much of that depends on the height, the weight and the design of the cake. First figure out what you want to create and then ask how to get there--you'll get better answers I promise! thumbs_up.gif

MimiFix Posted 31 Dec 2011 , 1:28am
post #8 of 16

The OP said she wanted to be as professional as possible, so I thought she was asking for business help. OP?

AZCouture Posted 31 Dec 2011 , 2:56am
post #9 of 16

Sorry, guess I've been at this so long, it doesn't occur to me to really differentiate between events anymore. Most of my occasion cakes are way more involved than the weddings around me.

QTCakes1 Posted 31 Dec 2011 , 3:56am
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZCouture

Sorry, guess I've been at this so long, it doesn't occur to me to really differentiate between events anymore. Most of my occasion cakes are way more involved than the weddings around me.




I agree, cake is cake is cake. If it's a 4-tiered topsy turvy birthday cake, it the same as doing a 4-tiered topsy turvy wedding cake. What is in name? But the question is too general to give the OP a specific answer.

AnnieCahill Posted 31 Dec 2011 , 12:58pm
post #11 of 16

My honest advice to you is practice before you take on a wedding cake. Be honest with them about your skill level and be honest with yourself. Don't feel obligated to do something that is outside of your skill level just because you feel pressured. You will have many opportunities for wedding cakes.

I only see two stacked cakes in your gallery. AZ was right, cake is cake is cake, but weddings are a big deal and that's a day you can't do over if you have any cake snafus.

If you feel like you are confident in your stacking abilities, then just focus on polishing up the finished product a bit. Overall you do very nice work!

tiggy2 Posted 31 Dec 2011 , 1:38pm
post #12 of 16

Looks like the OP isn't interested enough to come back with more details.

FondantDreams Posted 31 Dec 2011 , 2:42pm
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiggy2

Looks like the OP isn't interested enough to come back with more details.




OP'er had a 2 tiered birthday cake and a party to attend yesterday but thank you icon_smile.gif

I appreciate the advice of all of you more experienced designers/artists, I'm just trying to figure out how tastings go and what to do next. How do I take the order for the cake, when do I collect the money, is it my responsibility to serve and clean up at the wedding, etc?

Yesterdays cake, in which I am about to post a picture of in my album, was a bit stressful so now I am doubting my abilities to do bigger cakes. The bottom is a 12" NOT torted, mostly because I don't have a serrated knife long enough, but I am concerned about HOW to move the now cut top off of the bottom without it ripping? That is only the 12" too!!! So doing anything bigger than that is completely out of my comfort zone right now unless I I do a bit of practicing before signing anything. This wedding will be at the end of May and inside a building so it won't be too hot or humid.

ReneeFLL Posted 31 Dec 2011 , 3:26pm
post #14 of 16

For cutting a 12" cake you dont need a 12" knife. Cut the cake all the way around and as long as the knife goes 1/2 way thru then it will work.

For lifting the top off I use a flat baking/cookie sheet for this. There is no lip on it and it will slide between and lift it off.

tiggy2 Posted 31 Dec 2011 , 3:42pm
post #15 of 16

A 50% non refundable deposit should be collected to hold the date with the balance due at least 2-3 wekks prior to the wedding (I would suggest a month in advance if it were me). If you cut the cake and clean up you should charge an hourly fee for time. Most bakers also charge a delivery fee. Depending on the venue where the event will take place they may require proof of business license as well as insurance so I would check that out in advance so you have it available when delivering.

Sugarshack has great DVDs that will take you step by step through stacking, smoothing buttercream and applying fondant. Her website is www.sugaredproductions.com

There are several threads on this site discussing tasting and contracts, just do a search or look in the business forums.

FondantDreams Posted 31 Dec 2011 , 3:51pm
post #16 of 16

Thank you to both of you for your wisdom! I will take all of this advice and hopefully run to a wedding!

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