3D Fondant Characters Squishing Short And Fat While Drying

Decorating By Heather_bakes Updated 15 Apr 2014 , 1:49am by Diney411

Heather_bakes Posted 15 Dec 2011 , 3:34am
post #1 of 8

I have been playing around making 3D fondant characters but since the fondant is so heavy the parts of the characters are drying short and flat on the bottom. How do I support them while they dry so they don't flatten? I am using the fondant as you would form clay. Should I be wrapping it around rice krispies squares instead? the figures are not huge (head diameter is around 2 inches)

7 replies
msulli10 Posted 15 Dec 2011 , 3:45am
post #2 of 8

Try adding tylose powder to the fondant. It will make the fondant firmer and dry quicker. Also, it might help if you support the pieces with a toothpick down the center.

Mikail Posted 15 Dec 2011 , 4:17am
post #3 of 8

Agree with Tylose and toothpicks...They're usually a must (also using gumpaste). Also, sometimes it's better to dry out heavier parts separately and then attach/assemble once they're dry. I had the same issue when I first started making them icon_smile.gif Bear in mind the seams later on... which you cover with clothing, etc. If this isn't the case, then compartmentalizing the parts/figure and drying them horizontally.

Annabakescakes Posted 15 Dec 2011 , 4:42am
post #4 of 8

I have this problem too, but it is because my hands are so hot! I smooth it into the basic shape I want, then let it cool for a while, then do the details. Works for me! Oh, if it is too cool, it crinkles.

MamaDear Posted 15 Dec 2011 , 7:19am
post #5 of 8

I have some of the same problems with fondant figures flattening but I have found that using a gumball as a base (you can get different sizes) especially for round parts like heads, baby butts, etc. and shaping the fondant around it provides for a much sturdier base. The zebra on the pink petal cake in my pics has a gumball head with another half of a gumball pressed against it to form the nose, covered the whole thing in fondant and let it dry and it kept the shape pretty well. The body has gumballs in it as well. I am just sure to tell my friends that there are gumballs in there in case they want to bite it. (who knows what crazy stuff folks do, I hate the taste of fondant). It also cuts down a little on the weight of the figure cause fondant is heavy!!!

HTH Happy Caking!!!

NcLeora Posted 15 Dec 2011 , 11:01am
post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by MamaDear

I have some of the same problems with fondant figures flattening but I have found that using a gumball as a base (you can get different sizes) especially for round parts like heads, baby butts, etc. and shaping the fondant around it provides for a much sturdier base. The zebra on the pink petal cake in my pics has a gumball head with another half of a gumball pressed against it to form the nose, covered the whole thing in fondant and let it dry and it kept the shape pretty well. The body has gumballs in it as well. I am just sure to tell my friends that there are gumballs in there in case they want to bite it. (who knows what crazy stuff folks do, I hate the taste of fondant). It also cuts down a little on the weight of the figure cause fondant is heavy!!!

HTH Happy Caking!!!





Ah!!! Excellent tip! Thanks thumbs_up.gif

esq1031 Posted 15 Dec 2011 , 11:52am
post #7 of 8

I find this a problem too. I will try the gumball method which sounds great. I also find that when I try to secure the figures with a toothpick or lollipop stick, the figure slides down. I have used gumpaste instead of fondant and I find that it dries too fast and I get that elephant skin which drives me crazy.

Diney411 Posted 15 Apr 2014 , 1:49am
post #8 of 8

Great tip, I too will try this.

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