Olenmetra Posted 13 Dec 2011 , 4:13am
post #1 of

Where can I buy unfrosted cakes if I do not want to bake and I just want to focus on my decorating?

21 replies
MarianInFL Posted 13 Dec 2011 , 4:37am
post #2 of

Check your local grocery store and Super Walmart. You just need to ask one of the bakery people. One of the ladies in my class always store bought hers.

jason_kraft Posted 13 Dec 2011 , 5:06am
post #3 of

Decorating with cake dummies would be cheaper in the long run.

CWR41 Posted 13 Dec 2011 , 6:08am
post #4 of

If you're looking to buy wholesale in quantity, try Bakemark. There are many other wholesale suppliers for specific regions... if you care to state where you are located, I can give more localized suggestions.

EvieliciousCakes Posted 13 Dec 2011 , 3:24pm
post #5 of

when people order a cake from you, dont they ask for a specific flavor and filling? will the store be able to do that? is it proffitable?

carmijok Posted 13 Dec 2011 , 4:15pm
post #6 of

It's rather expensive to buy an unfinished cake. I priced a 10" round at Sam's and it was going to be over $12. If I wanted to do a tiered cake, it could really add up! Plus it doesn't taste as good as home baked. I was just checking to see if I could get one in a pinch.

Why not set aside a baking day and make a bunch of cakes in different sizes and freeze them? That way you can concentrate on decorating and you'll have a supply on hand to use when needed? It will taste better believe me and your cost will be minimal.

Annabakescakes Posted 13 Dec 2011 , 7:46pm
post #7 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by carmijok

It's rather expensive to buy an unfinished cake. I priced a 10" round at Sam's and it was going to be over $12. If I wanted to do a tiered cake, it could really add up! Plus it doesn't taste as good as home baked. I was just checking to see if I could get one in a pinch.

Why not set aside a baking day and make a bunch of cakes in different sizes and freeze them? That way you can concentrate on decorating and you'll have a supply on hand to use when needed? It will taste better believe me and your cost will be minimal.




What a great solution!!!

CWR41 Posted 13 Dec 2011 , 9:03pm
post #8 of

True wholesale prices are very affordable... For example:
you can find 6" layers for as little as $1.16 - $1.33 apiece (12-pk case),
10" white layers for $2.63 - $3.21 apiece (20 oz. ea., 8-pk case or 25 oz. ea., 4-pk case),
10" devils food layers for $2.88 apiece (20 oz. ea., 8-pk case),
depending on the supplier.

You'll need to contact the sales rep for your area for a product catalog or price list.

Olenmetra Posted 14 Dec 2011 , 3:26am
post #9 of

CRW41 - I am in North Carolina

CWR41 Posted 14 Dec 2011 , 4:16am
Quote:
Originally Posted by Olenmetra

CRW41 - I am in North Carolina




Just making sure you didn't need info for strickly Canadian or such. (I had a suggestion for a go-to supplier there, and possibly one for California and surrounding area.)

It looks like Tucker, Georgia would be your nearest BakeMark distributor:
http://www.bakemarkusa.com/

EvieliciousCakes Posted 14 Dec 2011 , 4:16pm

are frozen cakes good? i havent been baking for a long time but just the thought of "frozen" doesnt add up to me.. is it still fresh?
does it depend on the recipe or the brand of boxed cake mix?

loriemoms Posted 25 Dec 2011 , 7:29pm

I agree, you can buy bakemark frozen cakes and I think Dawn also sells them. It wouldn't be that more expensive considering your time and oven space, etc

I have an account with both companies..where in NC are you? Please feel free to PM me if you would like info of the reps that do the NC area or would like to order through me to test drive a cake..
I am in the Raleigh Area.

good luck!

kakeladi Posted 25 Dec 2011 , 8:56pm

............are frozen cakes good? ......just the thought of "frozen" doesnt add up to me.. is it still fresh?
does it depend on the recipe or the brand of boxed cake mix?............

A home made (box or scratch) cake that has been fzn is just as good or better than a fresh oneicon_smile.gif You must try it once. Properly wrapped and stored in the fzr is the perfect way to keep ahead of you orders.

loriemoms Posted 25 Dec 2011 , 9:41pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by kakeladi

............are frozen cakes good? ......just the thought of "frozen" doesnt add up to me.. is it still fresh?
does it depend on the recipe or the brand of boxed cake mix?............

A home made (box or scratch) cake that has been fzn is just as good or better than a fresh oneicon_smile.gif You must try it once. Properly wrapped and stored in the fzr is the perfect way to keep ahead of you orders.




I personally think frozen cakes suck. and I think freezing ahead is a good idea if is a dedicated freezer (won't pick up smells of your favorite frozen stew! icon_smile.gif I personally have never bought frozen cake, (I use Bakemark and Dawn for bulk flour, sugar, butter, etc...and i LOVE Dawn's velv-top!) but the grocery stores all do it and consumer's don't seem to mind it. Now if you tell customers...that is up to you. I suspect the OP just wants to practice?

NcLeora Posted 26 Dec 2011 , 12:27am
Quote:
Originally Posted by Olenmetra

CRW41 - I am in North Carolina





I am in North Carolina-- I have bought unfinished cakes at Food Lion in the bakery fridge--they even have big bags of "buttercream" icing--great in a pinch! icon_smile.gif

smendenhall Posted 28 Dec 2012 , 9:04pm

i want to know the same thing but no store local sale them

Godot Posted 28 Dec 2012 , 9:15pm

AWe have lots of people coming in and wanting to buy uniced cakes. I refuse every single time, and some people have offered lots of money.

-K8memphis Posted 28 Dec 2012 , 9:33pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Godot 

We have lots of people coming in and wanting to buy uniced cakes. I refuse every single time, and some people have offered lots of money.

 

Why do you not wanna sell them uniced? Just curious.

BakingIrene Posted 29 Dec 2012 , 8:43pm

I have sold un-iced cakes to customers who ordered them as such.  They ate them un-iced.

 

I have also had the BakeMark cakes and they aren't any different than what you get by baking a cake mix.  They work much better when you slice the layers and add a pie filling for extra lubrication.

 

But the original post raises some questions:  it is legitimate for people to ask "did you bake this cake",  "do you bake from scratch or from a mix" and you had better be prepared to explain the facts honestly.

 

The list of questions expands for states with cottage food laws.  In such cases, you must label with the list of ingredients which you must accurately derive from the wholeale source of your cake layers.  And most customers who check will see that there are commercial preservatives present.

 

For anybody who is having trouble with the baking, there are adult ed courses in most big cities in the US and Canada as well as at community colleges.  These courses aren't expensive.  They are worthwhile.

loriemoms Posted 23 Jan 2013 , 11:40pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Olenmetra 

CRW41 - I am in North Carolina

If you are a home baker, you will not be able to buy from bakemark or Dawn, who both have pre made cakes.  They only deliver to store locations because of insurance reasons.

 

If you want to go this direction, you can buy them from Sams or you can ask Dawn for a local bakery in your area they deliver to, and ask that bakery if you can latch on to their order and pick up from them.  They might do it for you.

 

Personally, I would bake the cakes and freeze them.  So much more tastier and wider variety of flavors!

jason_kraft Posted 23 Jan 2013 , 11:54pm

A

Original message sent by loriemoms

If you are a home baker, you will not be able to buy from bakemark or Dawn, who both have pre made cakes.  They only deliver to store locations because of insurance reasons.

I've bought products from Bakemark by picking up at their warehouse (Union City, CA), all they needed to see was a business license.

Stitches Posted 24 Jan 2013 , 1:18am

Where do you live, I'd sell cakes unfrosted.

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