My Cake Cricut Is A Paper Weight... Help Please :)

Decorating By bmarlow001 Updated 19 Dec 2011 , 5:43pm by Vista

bmarlow001 Posted 8 Dec 2011 , 4:40pm
post #1 of 25

So I begged and begged my husband for a Cake Cricut and finally got one back in March! icon_smile.gif

why is it I still have not used it???

Well ...... I don't know how to! lol

I have tried simple letters and couldn't get it to come out of the machine without completely demolishing the letter. Is there anyone that can give me some quick tips on how to get it working?? I am wanting to do an elegant wedding cake in May using some of the detailed images from a cartridge I bought but I know with my current cricut skills they will be unrecognizable by the time it comes out.

Any help to get me started on mastering this very expensive paper weight would be amazing and very much appreciated!! icon_smile.gif

24 replies
flapper Posted 8 Dec 2011 , 4:49pm
post #2 of 25

Just an idea for you. I recently spent time on the internet looking for some kind of instruction on using the machine, but basically didn't find anything. However, I did order and receive one thing I found. If you look at www.sugardelites.com, they do have an instructional DVD (2 actually) on "Simple Designs Using Cricut Cake" I haven't had time to watch the entire DVD, but I did skim through it quickly, and it appears to be quite a good DVD. They also sell one for more advanced designs using Cricut. Hope this helps you. Can't wait to see what you make!!!!![/center]

cupadeecakes Posted 8 Dec 2011 , 5:01pm
post #3 of 25

What are you cutting on your Cricut? I find that fondant cuts horribly! But modeling chocolate and candy clay work great! Gumpaste cuts well too. What I found was that ANYTHING I cut in the Cricut cut better if I popped it in the freezer for 5 minutes before I cut it. For very thin, intricate cuts, I will also pop it back in the fridge after cutting. I love my Cricut, but there is a learning curve. Keep playing with it!

petiterouge42 Posted 8 Dec 2011 , 5:03pm
post #4 of 25

I actually own both of those instructional dvd's and I would not recommend anyone wasting the money on them. They are WAY too expensive for what they offer. They give you a recipe specific for the cricut- but personally I use wilton fondant (because it is a pretty stiff fondant) and roll it out thin and it works pretty well. They don't give you anything you couldn't find for free on youtube.

The first thing you do it coat the mat with a thin layer or crisco, then I roll out the fondant (or gumpaste) very thin. Next I place it on the mat, and roll it in all directions, making sure it won't slide around. The biggest trick is to get it as thin as possible. When I first got my cricut cake I got SO frustrated because I couldn't even get letters to cut without them getting pulled about and squished. The thinner you roll it- the less chance of that happening. Also the speed should be on slow or min, and the pressure should be on the higher settings.

The bigger and less complex the design the better. I also recently found a tutorial on youtube showing the cricut cake cutting sugarveil. I do have some, and have been looking to try that for awhile, but have not gotten a chance yet. The tutorial showed them cutting very intricate designs with great success.

bmarlow001 Posted 8 Dec 2011 , 5:10pm
post #5 of 25

Thank you both for your reply!

I have only used the fondant sheets that I bought for the cricut so far but putting them in the freezer is a great idea.. will definitely try that!

petiterouge, do they sell the sugar veil somewhere? I am looking to do the very intricate designs for this cake so maybe that will be the way to go. Also, I have made gumpaste before with very little success... do you have a good recipe for it you could point me in the direction to?

Thanks a TON!!

GGFan Posted 8 Dec 2011 , 5:50pm
post #6 of 25

Thank you about the information about the instructional DVDs. I were just wondering about that. Have anyone have the Elegant cakes cartridges. I'm thinking about it but not sure if I should get the Provocraft Elegant cake or Martha Stewart ones. Does anyone have any thoughts? Thank you so much.

tiggy2 Posted 8 Dec 2011 , 7:17pm
post #7 of 25

Linda McClure has great DVDs since she invented the method of cutting gunpaste with electronic cutters. If you want to make it easy on yourself and get great intricate, detailed cuts use the premium frosting sheets from icing images. They cut like butter and are a dream to wotk with. Linda has a demo using them on cakes we bake website that you can watch.

Dayti Posted 8 Dec 2011 , 7:32pm
post #8 of 25

Tiggy, please can you provide a link for Linda's demo on that site? I tried searching to no avail, I couldn't see hers.

flapper Posted 8 Dec 2011 , 7:38pm
post #9 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by petiterouge42

I actually own both of those instructional dvd's and I would not recommend anyone wasting the money on them. They are WAY too expensive for what they offer. They give you a recipe specific for the - but personally I use wilton fondant (because it is a pretty stiff fondant) and roll it out thin and it works pretty well. They don't give you anything you couldn't find for free on youtube.

The first thing you do it coat the mat with a thin layer or crisco, then I roll out the fondant (or gumpaste) very thin. Next I place it on the mat, and roll it in all directions, making sure it won't slide around. The biggest trick is to get it as thin as possible. When I first got my cake I got SO frustrated because I couldn't even get letters to cut without them getting pulled about and squished. The thinner you roll it- the less chance of that happening. Also the speed should be on slow or min, and the pressure should be on the higher settings.

The bigger and less complex the design the better. I also recently found a tutorial on youtube showing the cake cutting sugarveil. I do have some, and have been looking to try that for awhile, but have not gotten a chance yet. The tutorial showed them cutting very intricate designs with great success.




It's so nice to know I "wasted" my hard earned money.

justkist Posted 8 Dec 2011 , 7:57pm
post #10 of 25

HA! This was a great read as I too have a $339 paperweight in my cake room! I bought TONS of cartridges too and have used it ONCE!!! Maybe its time to revisit the Cricut!

msulli10 Posted 8 Dec 2011 , 8:11pm
post #11 of 25

I just bought the cake cricut for $49.99 and it comes with 2 cartridges. I won't feel so bad if it doesn't work for me!

tiggy2 Posted 8 Dec 2011 , 8:37pm
post #12 of 25

The link will be blocked. go to cakes we bake dot com (no spaces) On the left side click on ustream and look for her videos.

bmarlow001 Posted 8 Dec 2011 , 8:38pm
post #13 of 25

Tiggy, I too would love to see those demos if you have a link to them icon_smile.gif thank you!

justkist, I was definitely thinking that same thing this morning... i'm sure my husband hates that I have only tried using it twice after me crying and whining about it for like 6 months icon_wink.gif haha!

msulli10, ............... I feel like your rubbing that in our face ;( ... LOL!!

bmarlow001 Posted 8 Dec 2011 , 8:43pm
post #14 of 25

Thank you, Tiggy!!!

petiterouge42 Posted 8 Dec 2011 , 10:13pm
post #15 of 25

The gumpaste recipe I use is:

1 lb conf sugar
6 tsp tylose powder
2Tbsp meringue powder
5 Tbsp warm water

Wisk water and meringue until frothy. Add sugar little by little on slow speed. Once all the sugar is added, increase to medium speed until soft peak. Turn back to low and add tylose powder. Then I just kneed it and wrap it up tight to store. It's best if you let it sit overnight and use it the next day.

The recipe they give you on those DVD's is:

1/2 C cold water
1/2 Corn syrup
2 Tbsp gelatin
1tsp lemon juice
2 lbs conf sugar
2 Tbsp tylose
2Tbsp melted shortnening

Dissolve gelatin in water and allow to bloom. Put on low heat to fully dissolve gelatin. Stir in corn syrup, lemon juice and shortnening until combined. Add sugar and tylose.

I only used the second recipe once, and I didn't like it as much as the recipe I usually use, and it was more "high maintenance" to make. But I thought I would post it in case someone wants to try it and does end up liking it better.

I didn't mean to insult anyone by my comment of "wasting money" on the cricut instructional dvd's I just meant I personally did not find them helpful and at around $35 (now), I think I got mine when they were almost $40 because they had just come out. That in my mind is a lot to spend on something that offers very little helpful information on getting the most out of the cricut cake. Especially when youtube offers free tutorials that offer the same and/or better information.

You can find the sugarveil online- it is a little pricey, but a little can go a long way. You can get it at GlobalSugarArt and it's $5.99 for 5 ounces. (not including shipping). Once you get the sugarveil- go to youtube and type sugarveil with electronic cutters and you will get a great video with instructions on how to use it with the cutting machine.

I like the elegant cakes cartridge, but am not a fan of the Martha Stewart ones. There is also one with damask designs that I just got, that is great for wedding cakes.

bmarlow001 Posted 9 Dec 2011 , 2:10pm
post #16 of 25

Wow!! thank you so much, petiterouge icon_smile.gif

I think I will try the first recipe first being it is so much easier! do you mix the fondant and gumpaste together when making figures? if so is it best to do the same when putting it through the cutter?

cakelady2266 Posted 9 Dec 2011 , 11:30pm
post #17 of 25

I'm one of those press buttons instead of reading instructions or watching dvd's type people. So by trial and error this are my foolproof helpful hints:

1. Wilton's fondant is great for the cricut cutter, it's cheaper, stiffer, so keep a box on hand. Add a little bit of Tylose or powdered sugar to fondant so it won't be so sticky. Gumpaste taste nasty so I don't recommend it for any design that is going to be eaten.

2. Lightly grease mat, roll out fondant some and place on mat and finish rolling out to proper size. For designs that are going to be flat on the sides or top of cake roll the fondant pretty thin (thin enough you can see the lines of the mat through the fondant) For pieces that are going to dry and stand up add a good bit of tylose powder to the fondant and roll it out just a little thicker.

3. Place fondant covered mat in freezer for about 15-20 minutes. While fondant is in the freezer get the machine set up (design, size). IMPORTANT: SET THE PRESSURE ON MEDIUM AND THE SPEED ON HIGH, (If your machine is set on low speed or low pressure it will tear up the design and drag the fondant around). Have the machine set up when you take the fondant out of the freezer. Cut out the designs needed and unload mat from machine.

4. Now this step is very important in getting the designs off the mat successfully and I promise it works!!!!!! Remove all the excess fondant away from the designs, if the design is going on the sides or top of cake you need to let it dry for a little while before removing from mat. You can put the mat in the oven with the oven light only on for about 20 minutes. Or you can let the design air dry on the mat for about an hour or so. You want it to be dry enough to handle but flexible enough to shape to the cake. Slide a thin blade or icing knife under the designs and left off the mat. Any designs that are going to stand up need to be removed from the mat and dried on a cake cooling rack in the oven with the light only on for about 3-4 hours or air dried over night.

5. When placing designs on cake slightly moisten the back of the design with a tiny amount of water, to a lot. Blot gently if needed before placing on cake. Or use a tiny amount of buttercream icing. I don't recommend piping gel because it doesn't dry and the designs can slide.

Well I hope this helps. I have several cakes in my gallery that I used the cricut on, check them out. PM me if you have any questions.

bmarlow001 Posted 12 Dec 2011 , 3:43pm
post #18 of 25

I'm not sure what is wrong with me but I worked with the cricut yesterday and got nowhere icon_sad.gif I was using the fondant sheets I bought with the cricut, I froze them before and adjusted the knobs.. still.. my snowflakes were tearing all over the place! grrr...

cupadeecakes Posted 12 Dec 2011 , 4:15pm
post #19 of 25

We use our maching a lot. Check out our blog for samples of what you can do with it. I do not agree with the previous advice just because that has never worked for us. I believe the secret is using modeling chocolate(Mike McCarey's recipe) or candy clay (Wilton's recipe). It cuts perfectly when chilled for a few minutes and doesn't break like dry fondant or stretch like fresh fondant. If you just can't use modeling chocolate use a product that really hardens in the cooler like Fondarific or Choco-Pan. I can't use any fondant that I like covering a cake with in the Cricut. It's too soft and stretchy. We have our machine set on medium pressure, etc. and never have a problem. The second most important thing is to roll it thinner than you think you can. If you are using white, you can often see the print on the mat under the product. Best of luck! Don't give up, it's a good tool when you get comfortable with it.

bmarlow001 Posted 12 Dec 2011 , 5:00pm
post #20 of 25

Thank you! I was going to go to hobby lobby and see what I could get to do more experimenting rather than just trying the fondant. the modeling clay by wilton, can I buy that or do I need to make it? either way I will definitely give it a try icon_smile.gif

Thank you!

Lucyem Posted 13 Dec 2011 , 9:00pm
post #21 of 25

I have been playing with my cricut for a little while and trying to incorporate tips I have seen on youtube or read on here. So far I have had the best luck with Duff's Fondant I got at Michaels. It tastes pretty good compared to other premade fondants I have tried. I roll it really thin on a fondant mat and then move it to the greased cricut mat, roll once more, freeze for about 5 minutes while setting the machine and cut at medium or high speed and medium pressure. I freeze again afterwards before taking out the images.

sillywabbitz Posted 13 Dec 2011 , 9:39pm
post #22 of 25

Also try icing sheets. I tried just a basic Lucks sheet and it did pretty well. I only want mine for lettering so the icing sheets are nice option if not a bit pricey. Apparently Icing Images (the company) www.icingimages.com has premium icing sheets specifically for cutters. I think I need to reduce my speed because I got a little bit of bunching but it seems to work well based on my quick test last weke.

tmelrose Posted 16 Dec 2011 , 6:02am
post #23 of 25

Sorry to sound like a dummy, but how exactly does the Cricut work?

aprilismaius Posted 19 Dec 2011 , 2:19pm
post #24 of 25

I use half fondant, half modelling chocolate. You don't have to let it freeze, you don't have to let it dry, and it just works. I have had nothing but failures using plain fondant, plain gumpaste, fondant with tylose, etc. Give it a try, you'll be glad you did.

Vista Posted 19 Dec 2011 , 5:43pm
post #25 of 25

I use MMF that I roll very thin, then let it dry out for a couple of hours or overnight. I roll it directly on the mat. I have tried freezing it, but I have a side by side fridge and the freezer is too narrow to accommodate the 12x12 mat. The Mod Monkey cake in my gallery was done using the cricut cake and MMF. Good luck, don't give up yet!!

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