Does A Fondant Cake Taste As Good As A Buttercream Cake?

Decorating By DeeDeesCakeNStuff Updated 5 Jun 2012 , 7:40pm by vtcake

DeeDeesCakeNStuff Posted 30 Nov 2011 , 4:23pm
post #1 of 82

I have been told through the grapevine that most don't like the taste of fondant. I am fairly new to this and just learning, have never done fondant, and a little afraid to try as I have heard this time and time again. Is it that bad tasting? I see you can do more when you use fondant but if no one likes the taste than they won't eat it.

81 replies
Texas_Rose Posted 30 Nov 2011 , 4:31pm
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Generally you put a layer of buttercream underneath the fondant. If someone likes the taste of fondant, they can eat it. If not, it can be easily peeled off and left on their plate. My family started out not liking fondant but they got used to it over the years and now my mom and sister ask for my fondant scraps to nibble on like candy. Other people seem more eager to try fondant than they used to be, probably because of all the cake shows on TV.

jason_kraft Posted 30 Nov 2011 , 4:59pm
post #3 of 82

Most fondant does not taste that great and is too sweet for most adults. There is some fondant that is supposed to taste better (i.e. Fondarific), but it is considerably more expensive, and since most people peel it off anyway we don't use it.

FromScratchSF Posted 30 Nov 2011 , 6:01pm
post #4 of 82

Yes, fodant can taste really good. Sadly, lots of bakeries have deemed the good-tasting fondant as "too expensive" so they use the super cheap, crappy disgusting stuff on their cakes, thereby conditioning the public that fondant is "gross" and justifying not bothering with the good stuff because they say nobody eats it.

If you make it or you spend the money on the really good fondant, like Carma's Massa Ticino, it does get eaten and requested. If you buy Satin Ice like almost everyone else it gets thrown away.

I have very strong opinions about this matter - especially since I just did a bridal show where my table was overrun by 2000 people all claiming my display cakes, all covered in Massa Ticino, smelled heavenly and they wanted to eat them. That would never happen with Satain Ice or Wilton.

mariacakestoo Posted 30 Nov 2011 , 6:17pm
post #5 of 82

Dang straight FS. The crappy fondant has ruined it for those of us that use truly delicious stuff. IMO, it doesn't get any better than MFF with a dash of almond extract (instead of vanilla), or Massa.

LoveMeSomeCake615 Posted 30 Nov 2011 , 6:57pm
post #6 of 82

I agree with FromScratchSF!!! We would never use Wilton fondant on our cakes, it's foul. I've never even bothered to try Satin ice b/c I've heard it's no better. We make our own, either MMF or Michele Foster's, which is SO GOOD, and it's a dream to work with. Fondarific tastes amazing, but it is pricey, and you would have to pass that cost on to the customer.

We actually recently had a consultation where the bride said the last cake person they met with gave her the line about "everyone peels off the fondant, so it's ok that it tastes nasty." Seriously?? It's not expensive, nor is it hard to make your own.

mariacakestoo Posted 30 Nov 2011 , 7:03pm
post #7 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by LoveMeSomeCake615

We actually recently had a consultation where the bride said the last cake person they met with gave her the line about "everyone peels off the fondant, so it's ok that it tastes nasty." Seriously?? It's not expensive, nor is it hard to make your own.


I love and hate hearing this when I'm meeting with someone. It's one more thing that reassures me that I'm pretty much the only one in my area that gives a rat's behind about total quality. icon_rolleyes.gif

jason_kraft Posted 30 Nov 2011 , 7:47pm
post #8 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by FromScratchSF

Sadly, lots of bakeries have deemed the good-tasting fondant as "too expensive" so they use the super cheap, crappy disgusting stuff on their cakes, thereby conditioning the public that fondant is "gross" and justifying not bothering with the good stuff because they say nobody eats it.



I don't necessarily think it's "sad" that other bakeries pursue different competitive advantages. If you are having trouble distinguishing yourself from the competition and need something to help you stand out, paying the premium for great-tasting fondant is one way to go (assuming your target market will pay for it). To me, fondant flavor is more of a nice-to-have as opposed to a core advantage, but it can be a powerful differentiator if combined with the use of other premium ingredients.

We actually looked into fondarific but couldn't use it because it contains dairy and is not vegan, besides the fact that it was too expensive for our target market.

FromScratchSF Posted 30 Nov 2011 , 8:03pm
post #9 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_kraft

We actually looked into fondarific but couldn't use it because it contains dairy and is not vegan, besides the fact that it was too expensive for our target market.




Of course it's about competitive advantage, as in, my cake with fondant taste 100000000000% better then bakeries that try and cut costs and get the cheapest ingredients available. They DO pass the cost onto the customer regardless of the product they get, up-charging for fondant by as much as $2 per serving. For a 100 person wedding cake that's an extra $200 bucks for less then $20 in fondant and an extra 20 minutes in staff to use it. At least that's all it would "cost" me if I used Satin Ice. Me, I prefer to dedicate all the up-charge (and mine is only a buck) to a quality product that someone might actually want to eat.

Jason, your market is totally different since you go after cakes for people with dietary restrictions, but I just wanted to point out, as I'm sure you know, that no fondant will be vegan. It all has gelatin in it.

jason_kraft Posted 30 Nov 2011 , 8:09pm
post #10 of 82

Satin Ice fondant is vegan and does not contain gelatin.

http://www.rolledfondant.com/pdf/Satin-Nutrition_Ingred.pdf

FromScratchSF Posted 30 Nov 2011 , 8:50pm
post #11 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_kraft

fondant is vegan and does not contain gelatin.

http://www.rolledfondant.com/pdf/Satin-Nutrition_Ingred.pdf




LOL!!! I actually didn't know that... and maybe that's why it tastes so terrible icon_biggrin.gif Maybe if you added bacon or something icon_lol.gif OK, I stand corrected about the gelatin part.

AnnieCahill Posted 30 Nov 2011 , 9:06pm
post #12 of 82

OP, also keep in mind that the thickness of your fondant matters. I know some people are very talented and they can roll it super thin so it's not even noticeable.

I'm not a fondant decorator (meaning I don't cover cakes in fondant) but I do use it occasionally for some decorations. I use Wilton for stuff that dries rock hard (so I know no one will eat it LOL), and I also use it to cover cake boards. I had to order a small bucket of black Satin Ice a while back and it smelled really good. But some of the decorations had elephant skin which I've heard is common with SI these days. I never did taste any because I have an aversion to eating dark colored BC or fondant.

I would LOVE to buy some Massa but I can't justify the cost as I'm just a hobby decorator who does BC cakes. I have heard it tastes incredible and is wonderful to work with. Do you guys order from Albert Uster? That is actually pretty close to where I live.

I have also heard great things about Michele Foster's Fondant (MFF). Not to be confused with MMF, or marshmallow fondant. There is a very extensive set of directions under the most saved recipes for Michele's fondant.

scp1127 Posted 1 Dec 2011 , 6:36am
post #13 of 82

Fromscratch, I did everything I could to order your fondant and I couldn't get it. I tried to order from the site, but something always malfunctioned.

So I still use Fondarific. And I'm very happy with it, but I would love to try the Massa. My clients love the taste of the Fondarific. I ask them to just smell the area where it is kept and it smells like a buttercream candle. It also has a nice aroma if someone gets close to the cake. When I use the mocha flavor, the taste actually melds with the chocolate buttercream. I'm happy with it. I've only been to two functions where my fondant cakes were served. On the first time, almost all of the fondant was gone. This was my daughter's sweet 16 party. The other time was last month at my niece's wedding. About 50% was eaten.

When I started the bakery, I ordered every brand of fondant. I liked Fondarific for taste and variety in colors and flavors. Chocopan had great flavor in chocolate, but I never tried working with it.

Wilton and Satin Ice didn't have good smells or taste, plus I got elephant skin from Satin Ice.

My vegan wedding client actually chose Fondarific over vegan choices. She said they could take it off. She would let them know. I got the report back that they chose to eat it.

nanefy Posted 1 Dec 2011 , 2:08pm
post #14 of 82

Massa Ticino is not the same product as Massa Grischuna. Massa Grischuna you buy from Albert Ulster, Ticino I don't think you can. I live in the UK and I use Massa Ticino and it is an awesome product. It is expensive, but just like any product you make, the cost gets passed on to the customer.

I personally am seriously anal about build quality when it comes to cakes and the fondant has to be immaculate and have sharp edges. I roll my fondant to 2mm thick and have never had anyone leave fondant on their plates, it's always eaten.

I also use the satin ice dark chocolate fondant which is also amazing. Tastes great and covers cakes easily.

I have to say that fondant is one of those things, that you cant just try once and decide you don't like it. Getting fondant to look really good and have it be really thin takes a LOT of practice. If you try it once, roll it really thick and people don't eat it, that is not a fondant problem, that's a decorator problem. Granted there are some fondants that likely taste horrible, but there are a lot that taste great.
Put it this way, I'd rather put fondant in my mouth than buttercream made with shortening! Oh man, shortening gives me the heebs.

LoveMeSomeCake615 Posted 1 Dec 2011 , 2:52pm
post #15 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by nanefy


Put it this way, I'd rather put fondant in my mouth than buttercream made with shortening! Oh man, shortening gives me the heebs.




Haha, don't even get me started on shortening bc! That is some nasty stuff.

nanefy Posted 1 Dec 2011 , 2:53pm
post #16 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by LoveMeSomeCake615

Quote:
Originally Posted by nanefy


Put it this way, I'd rather put fondant in my mouth than buttercream made with shortening! Oh man, shortening gives me the heebs.



Haha, don't even get me started on shortening bc! That is some nasty stuff.




LOL - yeah basically a big ol bowl of icing sugar and grease!

jason_kraft Posted 1 Dec 2011 , 3:03pm
post #17 of 82

Funny you mention shortening, since the second ingredient in fondarific is partially hydrogenated palm oil, which is the only ingredient in Sweetex Z shortening. icon_smile.gif

nanefy Posted 1 Dec 2011 , 3:12pm
post #18 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_kraft

Funny you mention shortening, since the second ingredient in fondarific is partially hydrogenated palm oil, which is the only ingredient in Sweetex Z shortening. icon_smile.gif




I don't use Fondarific, but even if I did, the fondant on my cakes is so minimal that it melts in the mouth - buttercream made with shortening however, which if I did use it, would not only compose 3 of my 7 layers of each tier, but would also cover the outside of my cake to the tune of 1/4" thickness. When someone gets a slice of a wedding cake, if they get a middle piece, they get a 1.5" section of fondant that is 2mm thick, which can be removed if the person wants, which would hardly make any impact on the overall taste of the cake.
You can't compare the thinnest layer of fondant with thick layers of buttercream made with shortening, it's nonsensical.

LoveMeSomeCake615 Posted 1 Dec 2011 , 10:07pm
post #19 of 82

Yeah, sorry, but using a relatively small amount of shortening in fondant is not the same thing as buttercream that is made up of basically two ingredients: shortening and sugar.

mariacakestoo Posted 1 Dec 2011 , 10:14pm
post #20 of 82

Eh, it was a good try though.

jason_kraft Posted 1 Dec 2011 , 11:21pm
post #21 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by LoveMeSomeCake615

Yeah, sorry, but using a relatively small amount of shortening in fondant is not the same thing as buttercream that is made up of basically two ingredients: shortening and sugar.



Fondarific is also essentially shortening and sugar, the second ingredient is palm oil. The only real difference is the addition of dry milk, glycerin, and gum in the fondant.

It is absolutely correct that cakes typically use a lot more BC than fondant, I just thought it was interesting that there was such revulsion towards shortening (oil) when it is a key ingredient in just about every type of fondant available.

mariacakestoo Posted 1 Dec 2011 , 11:33pm
post #22 of 82

Not in mine, as well as several popular recipes I can think of that thousands of people use.

vpJane Posted 1 Dec 2011 , 11:38pm
post #23 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_kraft

Quote:
Originally Posted by LoveMeSomeCake615

Yeah, sorry, but using a relatively small amount of shortening in fondant is not the same thing as buttercream that is made up of basically two ingredients: shortening and sugar.


Fondarific is also essentially shortening and sugar, the second ingredient is palm oil. The only real difference is the addition of dry milk, glycerin, and gum in the fondant.

It is absolutely correct that cakes typically use a lot more BC than fondant, I just thought it was interesting that there was such revulsion towards shortening (oil) when it is a key ingredient in just about every type of fondant available.




Sure, there's shortening in fondant. About 2 tablespoons per each 8 cups of sugar. "Shortencream" (no butter in there) has a lot much more shortening per cup of sugar. Some recipes for fondant do not even have those 2 tbsp. of shortening in.

http://www.make-fabulous-cakes.com/rolled-fondant.html

http://www.bakingobsession.com/2009/01/17/homemade-fondant/

jason_kraft Posted 1 Dec 2011 , 11:39pm
post #24 of 82

The only type I've ever seen that does not contain oil is marshmallow fondant (which is not commercially available, you'd have to make it yourself).

mariacakestoo Posted 1 Dec 2011 , 11:40pm
post #25 of 82

Good grief. I make MFF, no oil or grease at all! Just butter. There. OMG I win!

AnnieCahill Posted 1 Dec 2011 , 11:42pm
post #26 of 82

Maria,

How much almond extract do you add to a recipe of MFF?

thanks,
Annie

jason_kraft Posted 1 Dec 2011 , 11:42pm
post #27 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by vpJane

Sure, there's shortening in fondant. About 2 tablespoons per each 8 cups of sugar.
...
http://www.make-fabulous-cakes.com/rolled-fondant.html

http://www.bakingobsession.com/2009/01/17/homemade-fondant/



Thanks for the links! I was under the impression that fondant typically contained more oil, but it looks like the fact that shortening/oil is the second ingredient in commercial fondant doesn't mean much since there is so much sugar.

But I (and most of my customers) still prefer shortening-based buttercream, regardless of allergies. icon_smile.gif

mariacakestoo Posted 1 Dec 2011 , 11:44pm
post #28 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnnieCahill

Maria,

How much almond extract do you add to a recipe of MFF?

thanks,
Annie


A dash. Literally, just a quick splash, I don't measure. It's so good with that in place of vanilla.

AnnieCahill Posted 1 Dec 2011 , 11:46pm
post #29 of 82

Thanks. I love almond everything.

Annabakescakes Posted 2 Dec 2011 , 12:17am
post #30 of 82

LOL! This is just too much! There is no shortening in my fondant either, just butter unless it is for a dummy. I, and all my customers, think criscocream is revolting!

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