mo63 Posted 19 Nov 2011 , 9:18am
post #1 of

can anybody tell me what "tempered chocolate" is please? icon_smile.gif

25 replies
Biya Posted 19 Nov 2011 , 12:09pm
post #2 of

Tempered chocolate just means that your chocolate has a smooth shiny appearance. Tempering chocolate means that you slowly melt your chocolate without over heating and stirring gently to avoid bubbles. HTH

mo63 Posted 19 Nov 2011 , 12:23pm
post #3 of

Thank you for your reply icon_biggrin.gif Iv learned something new today. icon_biggrin.gif

JanH Posted 19 Nov 2011 , 8:29pm
post #4 of

How to temper chocolate:

http://sweets.seriouseats.com/2010/03/how-to-temper-chocolate.html

http://www.davidlebovitz.com/2005/08/tempering-choco/

http://www.cookingforengineers.com/article/155/Tempering-Chocolate

HTH

itsacake Posted 19 Nov 2011 , 9:23pm
post #5 of

Some of the above posts make it sound very simple. It is not.

I have several books on tempering chocolate and have taken classes as well. I can describe exactly how to follow the seeding method and generally tell you how to "table temper" the chocolate complete with all the temperature curves, but it doesn't always work as it should in practice. You need just the right amount of seed and the right amount of agitation. If it isn't done precisely, you will end up with streaks or blotches in your chocolate after a few hours or a day.

If you decide to temper chocolate, do it a few times to make sure you have the basics down and leave yourself extra time If you don't want to temper chocolate, you can use"coating chocolate" or "chocolate melts" , which don't need tempering, because they don't contain cocoa butter. Chocolate chips are difficult or impossible to temper.

I'm going to take some more lessons in January to see if I can perfect the art It is definitely a worthwhile skill to possess.

mo63 Posted 20 Nov 2011 , 9:11am
post #6 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by JanH

How to temper chocolate:

http://sweets.seriouseats.com/2010/03/how-to-temper-chocolate.html

http://www.davidlebovitz.com/2005/08/tempering-choco/

http://www.cookingforengineers.com/article/155/Tempering-Chocolate

HTH




Thank you for your links, I will take a look. thumbs_up.gif

mo63 Posted 20 Nov 2011 , 9:13am
post #7 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsacake

Some of the above posts make it sound very simple. It is not.

I have several books on tempering chocolate and have taken classes as well. I can describe exactly how to follow the seeding method and generally tell you how to "table temper" the chocolate complete with all the temperature curves, but it doesn't always work as it should in practice. You need just the right amount of seed and the right amount of agitation. If it isn't done precisely, you will end up with streaks or blotches in your chocolate after a few hours or a day.

If you decide to temper chocolate, do it a few times to make sure you have the basics down and leave yourself extra time If you don't want to temper chocolate, you can use"coating chocolate" or "chocolate melts" , which don't need tempering, because they don't contain cocoa butter. Chocolate chips are difficult or impossible to tem

I'm going to take some more lessons in January to see if I can perfect the art It is definitely a worthwhile skill to possess.




Thank you for your advice thumbs_up.gif

Apti Posted 20 Nov 2011 , 10:53am
post #8 of

Itsacake is correct. Tempering chocolate is an art.

Here's another thread going on right now about which [chocolate] candy coating people like to best.
http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopicp-7236166-.html#7236166

MimiFix Posted 20 Nov 2011 , 1:52pm
post #9 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apti

Itsacake is correct. Tempering chocolate is an art.

Here's another thread going on right now about which [chocolate] candy coating people like to best.
http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopicp-7236166-.html#7236166




Even if you are careful with tempering, it can be a finicky process not always with good results. As I wrote in that thread, I often use candy melts with real chocolate to avoid tempering. Combining the two not only adds a nice flavor to the melts but it also avoids the "morning after" problem we can see with tempering.

kmstreepey Posted 20 Nov 2011 , 2:24pm

Tempering is melting chocolate in such a way so as to control the type of crystals that are formed in the chocolate so that the melted, worked with, and then cooled chocolate pieces will have the same qualities that we are used to in chocolate, like shiny appearance, crisp break, stays set with no cloudiness or streaks. The process involved getting the chocolate to certain temperatures in order, then "seeding" it with the proper crystals (basically unmelted chocolate) to get the melted chocolate to form the right crystals. That is what makes it fairly complicated, because it is easy to get the different temperatures wrong.

You can buy chocolate tempering machines that will do some of the temperature control work for you. I have one from Dove Chocolate Discoveries that I really like, though it only does small-ish batches. Before I got the machine, I only really used the candy melts.

I agree with others, though, that it is a worthwhile process to learn!

Serena4016 Posted 20 Nov 2011 , 2:43pm

I have a book "Le Cordon Bleu, Dessert Techniques". In the tempering section this book states that "Unlike cooking chocolate, eating chocolate does NOT need to be tempered." Because I have no desire or time for that matter to play with tempering chocolate....I have been melting hershey kisses/candy bars for my chocolate coating and it works great!!

(Hi Mimi, I'm Serena from HVBS. I always learn sooo..much from your expertise!! Thank-you!!)

MimiFix Posted 20 Nov 2011 , 3:17pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serena4016

I have a book "Le Cordon Bleu, Dessert Techniques". In the tempering section this book states that "Unlike cooking chocolate, eating chocolate does NOT need to be tempered." Because I have no desire or time for that matter to play with tempering chocolate....I have been melting hershey kisses/candy bars for my chocolate coating and it works great!!

(Hi Mimi, I'm Serena from HVBS. I always learn sooo..much from your expertise!! Thank-you!!)




Hi Serena, so nice to meet you here! And I just learned something from you: I had no idea that eating chocolate bypasses the tempering process. That big milk chocolate candy bar my husband squirreled away is now mine. (I'm bringing dipped cookies to our Hudson Valley Baking Society cookie exchange. See you there?)

Apti Posted 20 Nov 2011 , 6:14pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by MimiFix

Even if you are careful with tempering, it can be a finicky process not always with good results. As I wrote in that thread, I often use candy melts with real chocolate to avoid tempering. Combining the two not only adds a nice flavor to the melts but it also avoids the "morning after" problem we can see with tempering.




First time I've heard about mixing the two together AND about eating chocolate. So.....if I break up a Hershey bar (or other REAL chocolate with cocoa butter) and melt in the microwave along with an equal amount of Guittard A'Peels, I'll get the same workability and appearance with an improved taste?

Mo63~~The "taste" difference between compound coating and REAL chocolate is a function of the cocoa butter which lingers on the tongue and releases the flavor slowly and ends with a flavor note that lingers in the mouth with a wonderful mouth feel. Compound coatings do not possess the cocoa butter, hence the 'taste' and 'mouth feel' and 'after-taste' are lessened (or outright eliminated if you are a chocolate connoisseur 'who enjoys with discrimination and appreciation of subtleties').

Unless you are a purist, it is difficult to tell the difference if you are using an excellent quality of compound coating like Guittard A'Peels or Merckens.
Manufacturing compound coatings is MUCH, MUCH cheaper since hydrogenated palm (or other) oils are substituted for the cocoa butter. (Example: Much of the really awful Easter candy is made with a super-cheap compound coating.) Since coatings do not require tempering, they can be used for many, many applications and are perfect for hobby bakers or professional bakers.

Chocolate that is made into "chips" has added hardeners to keep the "chip" shape. That is why itsacake said, "Chocolate chips are difficult or impossible to temper. "

MimiFix Posted 20 Nov 2011 , 6:39pm

Apti, I don't even measure when melting, it's just an approximation. It's always been a success. And I often use chocolate chips, not a good-quality bar chocolate. I love dipping sandwiched cookies because they work well in cookie trays. Here are some pictures http://bakingfix.com/thefix/?p=5396

kmstreepey Posted 20 Nov 2011 , 6:45pm

"Eating chocolate," like a Hershey bar, is already tempered so sometimes you can melt it without it losing it's temper and then use it. You have to melt is slowly and until just barely melted, then stir to melt the rest of the way. Sometimes it works, sometimes it will lose its temper and all of the qualities that go along with tempered chocolate. (Ha - "lose its temper" - sometimes it does feel like it's just mad at you! icon_smile.gif )

itsacake Posted 20 Nov 2011 , 7:49pm

I have never heard of chocolate being divided into cooking and eating chocolate It would be interesting to hear how Le Cordon Bleu makes that distinction.

Rather, if you are going to cook with it, adding other ingredients like cream or adding it to cake batter, you don't have to temper chocolate (though some people think you'll have better results even then, if the chocolate is in temper)

However, I think kmstreepey is correct that if you have chocolate (eating or coooking) and it is in temper--having survived the distribution process-- and you manage to melt it without raising the temperature over about 88 degrees (a little less for milk or white) and you don't get any trace of moisture or steam into it, you may be able to preserve he temper. Alas, even that is not as simple as it sounds.

kmstreepey Posted 20 Nov 2011 , 9:01pm

I think what the Cordon Bleu book meant by "eating chocolate" was not a type of chocolate but a reference to actually consuming chocolate. As in, "to eat chocolate requires no tempering" or "just eat it and enjoy." I used the phrase to refer to a Hershey bar because it seemed that the other poster had assumed that it was a category. And it could be!

Serena4016 Posted 21 Nov 2011 , 8:44pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by kmstreepey

I think what the Cordon Bleu book meant by "eating chocolate" was not a type of chocolate but a reference to actually consuming chocolate. As in, "to eat chocolate requires no tempering" or "just eat it and enjoy." I used the phrase to refer to a Hershey bar because it seemed that the other poster had assumed that it was a category. And it could be!



I looked at the "Le Cordon Bleu" book again and it is written under "melting chocolate". So, I'm pretty sure they mean the type of chocolate that is ready to eat and made for eating as is...as opposed to chocolate that is made specifically for cooking with does not need to be tempered. It's all confusing to me!!!

kmstreepey Posted 21 Nov 2011 , 11:21pm

Interesting! Thanks for looking that up!

Serena4016 Posted 21 Nov 2011 , 11:40pm

It also states...Eating chocolate is..."Glossy , hard , smooth and sold as confectionary, this varies widely in quality. Allow the cocoa butter content to be your guide"

Couverture..." This is not an 'eating' chocolate. It is dull in appearance. Temper it before use so it sets to a hard, glossy finish."

Baker's chocolate... " This a superior form of the common 'cookoing' chocolate. Not particularily flavorful, it is used mainly for decorative purposes."

itsacake Posted 21 Nov 2011 , 11:41pm

I wonder if by "melting chocolate" they mean "chocolate flavored melts" which do not contin cocoa butter and thus do not need tempering?

Hershey bars and other such do need tempering if you heat them above 90 degrees or so.

Apti Posted 21 Nov 2011 , 11:42pm

Thanks Serena! I love learning new info like this.

Serena4016 Posted 21 Nov 2011 , 11:44pm

That would be 'cooking' chocolate... not 'cookoing chocolate'!! LOL

scp1127 Posted 22 Nov 2011 , 7:08am

Chocolate bars are already tempered. It is a final product to the consumer. Therefore it is in its proper crisp, shiny form.

If you purchase candy bars in fine chocolate, you will pay over $20.00 per pound. So if you want fine chocolate for coating, couverture chocolate is about half the price. But you must temper it yourself. Fine coating chocolate has a higher percentage of cocoa butter than a chocolate that you would melt to go into a cake or frosting.

If you try to use fine chocolate other than couverture, you may not get that thin, shiny, crisp coating.

Before you attempt tempering, I would suggest getting a chocolate thermometer. They are at BB&B for about $20.00. Tempering on the stove with a double boiler is easier to control the temp because you can watch the thermometer.

itsacake Posted 22 Nov 2011 , 8:05am

Whether it is a Hershey bar or fine couverture, when you buy it, if it has been kept all thorough the distribution process at proper temperatures, it will still be in temper such that it will be shiny and break crisply. If, however, it has gotten too warm, it may have bloomed or otherwise not be in perfect temper. If you melt it to dip fruit or chocolate centers or whatever, and it goes over about 90 degrees it will lose it's temper and you have to re-temper it.

If you use the seeding method, the seed chocolate must already be in perfect temper for the process to work. Then you need the correct amount of seed and the correct amount of agitation.

The are differing theories as to whether the seed should be a big chunk or a lot of little chopped up pieces. The temperature curve is different for each kind of chocolate (milk, dark, or white) and even varies by brand. My Callebaut dark says to melt to 122 degrees, many brands say 115 for dark.

A good chocolate thermometer is a big help, but an infra-red thermometer is even better. Since you need to keep the mixture agitated, the fact that you only get surface temperature is not a problem. Constant stirring keep the temperature throughout the mixture even and you get a reading immediately, which makes life lots easier.

JanH Posted 22 Nov 2011 , 11:13am
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apti

Quote:
Originally Posted by MimiFix

Even if you are careful with tempering, it can be a finicky process not always with good results. As I wrote in that thread, I often use candy melts with real chocolate to avoid tempering. Combining the two not only adds a nice flavor to the melts but it also avoids the "morning after" problem we can see with tempering.



First time I've heard about mixing the two together




Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakesCakes

I love mixing them together--that way you don't have to temper the real stuff!

I mix about 1/3 coating choco with 2/3 real. I melt the wafers and then add in the chopped up real until it melts. I do it all in the microwave, making sure that I don't get the melts too hot (50% power for a minute, stir, repeat).

The result sets up nicely.

HTH
Rae




http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-656566-.html

HTH

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