First 16" Cake

Baking By MissFortunate Updated 18 Nov 2011 , 9:32pm by chelleb1974

MissFortunate Posted 18 Nov 2011 , 7:27pm
post #1 of 4

I'm going to attempt to bake a 16" cake using box mixes. I'm guessing it's going to need about 7 mixes to get enough batter. How do you typically mix them. One at a time, and pour in pan and then move on to the next and keep adding? Is it OK for the batter to sit that long while mixing the additional boxes? I tried searching on this topic and couldn't find anything.

3 replies
jgifford Posted 18 Nov 2011 , 8:07pm
post #2 of 4

I've done a 16" cake and each layer took 2 mixes. I just mix them both at the same time in a larger bowl.

Apti Posted 18 Nov 2011 , 9:15pm
post #3 of 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by MissFortunate

I'm going to attempt to bake a 16" cake using box mixes. I'm guessing it's going to need about 7 mixes to get enough batter. How do you typically mix them. One at a time, and pour in pan and then move on to the next and keep adding? Is it OK for the batter to sit that long while mixing the additional boxes? I tried searching on this topic and couldn't find anything.




Congratulations on stepping up to a 16"! I just recently did my biggest project so far (14/12/10/8 in. cakes), and the largest cake was 14".

I used the following methods to end up with gorgeous, moist, 2" high cakes that frosted beautifully. I use doctored Duncan Hines cake mixes and get approximately 5 cups of batter per mix (1/2 cup more or less depending on the type of cake). [When I say "doctored", I do NOT mean using an extender recipe.]

Determine how many boxes of mix you'll need for each 2" high LAYER. (Each 4" high tier will have TWO 2" high layers.) Figure that each box mix will yield about 5 cups of batter, then look at this chart:

http://www.wilton.com/cakes/making-cakes/baking-wedding-cake-2-inch-pans.cfm

For the first of two total 16" layers you will need 15 cups of batter (or 3 box mixes). Mix 3 box mixes. Pour into 16" AFTER pan prep (see below), bake on middle shelf of oven at 325 degrees. It will take a long time.

AFTER that layer comes out of the oven to cool, THEN repeat above for the 2nd 16" layer.

If you have a KA that holds 4-1/2 to 5 quarts, you can mix two box mixes in your KA (double batch), then do the 3rd box in a bowl with a hand mixer. It will be ok to let them sit on the counter until you get the 3rd box mixed. Do NOT add them to the pan until all 3 are completely mixed.

PAN PREP: Methods to make sure you get a completely baked, 2" high cake that is level.

Bake Even Strips and Flower Nail on larger cakes --Photo tutorial:
http://www.wilton.com/forums/messageview.cfm?catid=8&threadid=148262&FTVAR_MSGDBTABLE=

TUTORIAL: How to collar a cake pan...
http://www.wilton.com/forums/messageview.cfm?catid=8&threadid=154355

I fill my pans a little more than half-way. I prefer to have some left-over batter (freeze or make cupcakes) than to have too-little batter. Using the "slight overfill" and the methods above, I was able to have two dead level, 2" high layers.

chelleb1974 Posted 18 Nov 2011 , 9:32pm
post #4 of 4

When I bake 16" round cakes, I use three cake mixes. I just mix and pour into the pan one at a time. I have a 4.5q KA and two mixed don't quite fit into it to my liking. It doesn't take me that long to mix up each cake mix so I don't worry about it.

~Chelle

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