angelleyes Posted 16 Nov 2011 , 3:20am
post #1 of

So once again I tried to melt white chocolate and of course it didn't do a thing.. I did it slow but as my luck goes something went wrong... I wish there was a fairy god mother who knows how to melt this stuff cause I sure could use her lol!

So since it didnt work out I figured out I would use it to make molding chocolate.. But of course thats not working.. If anyone has any suggestions on either prob I would so apperciate it! Thank you

25 replies
step0nmi Posted 16 Nov 2011 , 3:46am
post #2 of

first off, what type of white chocolate is this? HOW are you melting the white chocolate? are you doing anything to it while melting? those things would be helpful. icon_smile.gif

MCurry Posted 16 Nov 2011 , 3:55am
post #3 of

We would need more details to better help you. However, I only melt my chocolate over a water bath so I can better control the melting process.

As step0nmi said, "HOW are you melting the white chocolate?"

angelleyes Posted 16 Nov 2011 , 3:55am
post #4 of

lol o sorry... It's white chocolate chips.. I tried over the stove and then I tried the microwave... I stir it every so often just to see how much is melted...

angelleyes Posted 16 Nov 2011 , 3:57am
post #5 of

When I did it over the stove I let the water come to a boil , took it off the heat then put the chips over it

Foxicakes Posted 16 Nov 2011 , 4:07am
post #6 of

If it is Nestle, then it is just really vanilla flavored chips. The only supermarket brand white chocolate "chips" that I have found is Ghirardelli, meaning that they have cocoa butter in them. Baker's white chocolate is real white chocolate too (again, meaning that it has a percentage of cocoa butter)

As to the melting it, I do mine in the microwave at 20 to 30 second intervals. Microwave then take it out and stir with a rubber spatula, keep doing this until it is almost completely smooth. You don't want to do it for too long because it WILL burn.

If you only have access to the Nestle (etc) chips, try the microwave method and after the first or second turn in the oven, add about 1 tsp of vegetable shortening OR, if you can find it, food grade pure cocoa butter, to it and stir it really well. This will help it to melt smoother yet it will still "set up" once it cools.

HTH!! Good luck!!

angelleyes Posted 16 Nov 2011 , 4:11am
post #7 of

It was Nestle, and when I did it in 30 sec intervals.. but I did not use a rubber spatula..Maybe that was my problem? And the last time I added the shortening it made it worse I wonder what I did wrong there

step0nmi Posted 16 Nov 2011 , 4:30am
post #8 of

i find that the white vanilla chips from nestle never melt right. what Foxicakes said about Ghiradelli...those are much better.

step0nmi Posted 16 Nov 2011 , 4:31am
post #9 of

any amount of water...from the pan, from your spatula, from the boiling WILL seize the chocolate...it's very tricky business and I never do mine on the stove anymore :p

MCurry Posted 16 Nov 2011 , 4:34am

How many 30 second intervals did you try before adding the shortening? Perhaps you had it in too long and it seized up. I really don't think the use of a spatula vs. a wooden spoon or other would have impacted the end result.

Sorry it's not working out. Consider changing chocolate brands. Foxicakes is right about chocolates from grocery stores. Ghiradelli or Guittard can be purchased from grocery stores and are good quality chocolate.

angelleyes Posted 16 Nov 2011 , 4:39am

Thank you all so much for your responses.
The first time I added the shorting I waited till the end. This time I did it the 3rd time that I put it in the microwave. Maybe I let it burn and I didn't catch it in time. I will try the chocolate that u all have recommended

angelleyes Posted 16 Nov 2011 , 4:40am

I know about the water thing trust me I learned that one the hard way to lol

happyascanbee Posted 16 Nov 2011 , 5:01am

I do modelling chocolate a LOT... but I use Wiltons White Candy Melts... they work much better. White chocoltae is very weird... it does not have the same characteristics as the brown one.. here are cakes I covered/wrapped and decorated in modelling chocolate using Wiltons Candy melts:

Image

Image

Image

angelleyes Posted 16 Nov 2011 , 4:00pm

Those are very pretty!!!. What is the recipe with candy melts? I've just worked with fondant so im new to the chocolate molding thing

angelleyes Posted 16 Nov 2011 , 4:00pm

Those are very pretty!!!. What is the recipe with candy melts? I've just worked with fondant so im new to the chocolate molding thing

bobwonderbuns Posted 16 Nov 2011 , 4:28pm

If you are using white chocolate, you have to melt it at a MUCH lower temp than milk or dark chocolate. Anything other than that will cause it to burn and/or seize (or both!) icon_confused.gif If you have a chocolate melter, use it on "warm" to melt it, otherwise it will burn.

happyascanbee Posted 16 Nov 2011 , 9:33pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by angelleyes

Those are very pretty!!!. What is the recipe with candy melts? I've just worked with fondant so im new to the chocolate molding thing





For one package of Candy melts (13-14 ounces); 1/3 cup of light corn syrup.. melt your candy melts in a bowl in the microwave.. one minute at a time at power # 8.. check and stir every minute until smooth.. stir very well.

cool for about 10 minutes then add the corn syrup,... instantly this is thicken almost set... freeze for 15 minutes.. then knead to play dough consistency.. if U want to color, do it when it comes out of the microwave..

angelleyes Posted 17 Nov 2011 , 3:13am
Quote:
Originally Posted by happyascanbee

Quote:
Originally Posted by angelleyes

Those are very pretty!!!. What is the recipe with candy melts? I've just worked with fondant so im new to the chocolate molding thing




For one package of Candy melts (13-14 ounces); 1/3 cup of light corn syrup.. melt your candy melts in a bowl in the microwave.. one minute at a time at power # 8.. check and stir every minute until smooth.. stir very well.

cool for about 10 minutes then add the corn syrup,... instantly this is thicken almost set... freeze for 15 minutes.. then knead to play dough consistency.. if U want to color, do it when it comes out of the microwave..




Thank you very much for all the help..

angelleyes Posted 17 Nov 2011 , 5:38am
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobwonderbuns

If you are using white chocolate, you have to melt it at a MUCH lower temp than milk or dark chocolate. Anything other than that will cause it to burn and/or seize (or both!) icon_confused.gif If you have a chocolate melter, use it on "warm" to melt it, otherwise it will burn.






OOO one more question.. If I use colord candie melts with it affect the recipe?

bobwonderbuns Posted 17 Nov 2011 , 2:06pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by angelleyes

Quote:
Originally Posted by bobwonderbuns

If you are using white chocolate, you have to melt it at a MUCH lower temp than milk or dark chocolate. Anything other than that will cause it to burn and/or seize (or both!) icon_confused.gif If you have a chocolate melter, use it on "warm" to melt it, otherwise it will burn.





OOO one more question.. If I use colord candie melts with it affect the recipe?




Some. They all melt at lower temps -- the lighter colors seem to be more prone to burning. Be aware that red seems to be the oiliest of all colors for some reason.

Here's a great thread that will help you with making fabulous modeling chocolate: http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=Forums&file=/modules&name=Forums&file=viewtopic&t=728733&postdays=0&postorder=asc&&start=0 Mrs Mudrash is the QUEEN of modeling chocolate and her work demonstrates that.

Fondantgrl, or happyascanbee, whatever she's calling herself these days, did a nice job with the ruffling on this cake: http://cakecentral.com/gallery/2105525

bobwonderbuns Posted 17 Nov 2011 , 2:13pm

Here's a cake I did using modeling chocolate: http://cakecentral.com/gallery/2198049 The recipe I used kept tearing at the most inopportune places so mixed some chocolate fondant with it and had no problems after that.

lilmissbakesalot Posted 17 Nov 2011 , 2:32pm

See if you can find the Ghirardelli white chocolate bars... they melt nicely. The chips are designed to not melt right so they retain their shape in cookies. They usually have a wax like parafin in them. I don't think that the Ghirardelli chips do, but I'd be willing to bet the nestle ones do. Lindt is another easily found brand that tastes great and should melt better for you. Always try to find it in bar form unless you are buying chocolate buttons in bulk.

White chocolate is a pain though...

angelleyes Posted 18 Nov 2011 , 12:18am
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobwonderbuns

Here's a cake I did using modeling chocolate: http://cakecentral.com/gallery/2198049 The recipe I used kept tearing at the most inopportune places so mixed some chocolate fondant with it and had no problems after that.







Wow that's beautuful

angelleyes Posted 18 Nov 2011 , 12:21am
Quote:
Originally Posted by lilmissbakesalot

See if you can find the Ghirardelli white chocolate bars... they melt nicely. The chips are designed to not melt right so they retain their shape in cookies. They usually have a wax like parafin in them. I don't think that the Ghirardelli chips do, but I'd be willing to bet the nestle ones do. Lindt is another easily found brand that tastes great and should melt better for you. Always try to find it in bar form unless you are buying chocolate buttons in bulk.

White chocolate is a pain though...





LOL I soooo agree with that.. Thank you for the advice

happyascanbee Posted 18 Nov 2011 , 5:13am
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobwonderbuns

Quote:
Originally Posted by angelleyes

Quote:
Originally Posted by bobwonderbuns

If you are using white chocolate, you have to melt it at a MUCH lower temp than milk or dark chocolate. Anything other than that will cause it to burn and/or seize (or both!) icon_confused.gif If you have a chocolate melter, use it on "warm" to melt it, otherwise it will burn.





OOO one more question.. If I use colord candie melts with it affect the recipe?



Some. They all melt at lower temps -- the lighter colors seem to be more prone to burning. Be aware that red seems to be the oiliest of all colors for some reason.

Here's a great thread that will help you with making fabulous modeling chocolate: http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=Forums&file=/modules&name=Forums&file=viewtopic&t=728733&postdays=0&postorder=asc&&start=0 Mrs Mudrash is the QUEEN of modeling chocolate and her work demonstrates that.

Fondantgrl, or happyascanbee, whatever she's calling herself these days, did a nice job with the ruffling on this cake: http://cakecentral.com/gallery/2105525




Take your pick which name you want to call me.... does it matter ? really ?

happyascanbee Posted 18 Nov 2011 , 5:15am
Quote:
Originally Posted by angelleyes

Quote:
Originally Posted by bobwonderbuns

If you are using white chocolate, you have to melt it at a MUCH lower temp than milk or dark chocolate. Anything other than that will cause it to burn and/or seize (or both!) icon_confused.gif If you have a chocolate melter, use it on "warm" to melt it, otherwise it will burn.





OOO one more question.. If I use colord candie melts with it affect the recipe?




No, the coloring will not affect anything except the color..

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