Buttercream Melting Under Fondant

Decorating By Charmed Updated 13 Nov 2011 , 12:01am by Charmed

Charmed Posted 10 Nov 2011 , 5:30am
post #1 of 3

I used half butter, half crisco with meringue powder and pwd sugar. I iced the cake and even made the refrigerator colder so the icing will be hard and cold. I kept the cake in the fridge and as soon as I rolled the fondant I got the cake out and covered it and as I was trimming the fondant buttercream started to melt and oozed out from under.....and my buttercream is chocolate and fondant is white icon_cry.gificon_cry.gif

why is this happening? I never had this problem with Smbc or when I used high ratio shortening. could it be the crisco? since they changed it I am having problems. Help...

2 replies
BlakesCakes Posted 10 Nov 2011 , 9:12pm
post #2 of 3

If you applied the fondant to a really cold cake, your buttercream isn't "melting". Your buttercream recipe is fine.

You've created a situation where condensation formed by bringing a cold, moist cake into contact with warm, dry fondant.

The condensation formed between the buttercream & the fondant and the "sweat" turned brown from the chocolate in the icing.

You can chill a cake for 20 mins. in the fridge--or 10 mins. in the freezer-- & then cover with fondant. You get a firm surface, but little to no condensation.

If the cake is cold to the core, the process of condensation goes on for much longer than if the cake is merely cooled.

Rae

Charmed Posted 13 Nov 2011 , 12:01am
post #3 of 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakesCakes

If you applied the fondant to a really cold cake, your buttercream isn't "melting". Your buttercream recipe is fine.

You've created a situation where condensation formed by bringing a cold, moist cake into contact with warm, dry fondant.

The condensation formed between the buttercream & the fondant and the "sweat" turned brown from the chocolate in the icing.

You can chill a cake for 20 mins. in the fridge--or 10 mins. in the freezer-- & then cover with fondant. You get a firm surface, but little to no condensation.

If the cake is cold to the core, the process of condensation goes on for much longer than if the cake is merely cooled.

Rae



thanks blakescakes.

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