Freezing A Cake Covered In Fondant

Decorating By jem2131 Updated 9 Nov 2011 , 12:16am by BlakesCakes

jem2131 Posted 8 Nov 2011 , 3:53am
post #1 of 7

hello my CC'ers

I have a question, ive seen some post on here how some freeze cake covered in fondant and then defrosting the cake without have big condensation problems..
I actually want to try this out.. I usually cover my cakes in ganache and than fondant.. Will this work if i froze it ? or will the chocolate melt once it comes to room temp.. Is this only possible with buttercream frosted cakes ?
anyone who has tried this out please give me advice.. thank you all soo much in advance

6 replies
jem2131 Posted 8 Nov 2011 , 12:26pm
post #2 of 7

Sorry I had to bump this up again. I really hope there's someone who can help me icon_sad.gif thanks all in advance icon_smile.gif

MadMillie Posted 8 Nov 2011 , 2:32pm
post #3 of 7

From what I have read on here you can do it. It seams like you need to box the cake and wrap with plastic wrap. When you take it out of the freezer I think you put it in the refrig for awhile before out in room temp. Then room temp for awhile and unwrap. I may be totally wrong but I think gradually bringing it to room temp prevents problems. You may run into issues though with air pockets forming under the fondant. Post your results so I will know if it is in fact possible.

ittybittybakery Posted 8 Nov 2011 , 3:00pm
post #4 of 7

I've never done it with ganache, but did have problems with a buttercream covered cake, as well as a RCT form--- even when gradually bringing up the cake to room temperature. I had frozen my Angry Birds red bird to help firm it up for when I had to place it on the base cake. I applied it to the base cake, and kept it in the fridge for about a day, then when I took it out to photo it, within about 10 minutes it started to get really shiny and sweaty-looking. I blotted the moisture, with a smooth Viva paper towel, but generally speaking, wouldn't do this again any time soon. I had the same experience when working with a frozen RCT Yoda head. Again, I needed it a bit stiffer to pick it up without messing up the facial features which were made out of fondant and gumpaste. When it came to room temp slowly, first in the fridge and then out of the fridge when I was photo'ing it, it got pretty shiny and sweaty. No one seemed to notice and many thought it was quite cool looking that way-- super glossy, like a plastic toy, but I wasn't thrilled with that effect.

itscake Posted 8 Nov 2011 , 3:43pm
post #5 of 7

I have frozen a completely fondant covered and decorated cake( Notical theme) for 1 month..it was for a shower that had to be postponed....when it came time for the shower..I took it out of the freezer the night before...it did sweat but by morning was fine... only the royal icing suffered a bit...but it added to the underwater theme

jem2131 Posted 9 Nov 2011 , 12:08am
post #6 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by itscake

I have frozen a completely fondant covered and decorated cake( Notical theme) for 1 month..it was for a shower that had to be postponed....when it came time for the shower..I took it out of the freezer the night before...it did sweat but by morning was fine... only the royal icing suffered a bit...but it added to the underwater theme




did you use buttercream or ganache under the fondant ?

BlakesCakes Posted 9 Nov 2011 , 12:16am
post #7 of 7

Box room temp cake, wrap box in 2 layers of saran wrap and 1 layer of foil. Freeze.
Place in fridge 24 hrs. before needed--STILL BOXED & WRAPPED.
Several hours before serving/display, place on counter--STILL BOXED & WRAPPED--so that it comes to room temp.

Only when the BOXED & WRAPPED cake has come to room temp can you remove it from the box without issues of condensation.

Anything colder than the ambient air will develop condensation--UNLESS the environment is exceedingly dry--under 25% humidity.

Rae

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