Wedding Cake Cost??

Decorating By littleladyk Updated 7 Nov 2011 , 1:34am by littleladyk

littleladyk Posted 6 Nov 2011 , 2:55am
post #1 of 9

Hi All!

I am making my very first wedding cake and am curious about how much you all would charge for a 2 tier white buttercream iced cake with some fondant flowers on the top, that feeds 60 people, and she also wants about 30 cupcakes.

Now keep in mind this will be my first wedding cake so i dont want to charge to much being im still a rookie icon_smile.gif

Thanks for your help!!!

8 replies
jason_kraft Posted 6 Nov 2011 , 3:46am
post #2 of 9

Before you charge for the cake you'll want to make sure you can legally do so...some states have cottage food laws that allow you to sell food made at home, but other states require a licensed and inspected commercial kitchen.

To calculate a price for the cake and the cupcakes, you'll want to add up your costs for ingredients, labor (how much time it will take you multiplied by a reasonable hourly wage), and overhead (things like liability insurance and utilities on a per-order basis), then add 20-30% for your profit margin.

We start at $5/serving for tiered cakes and $30/dozen for cupcakes, but we are in CA so we have to rent a commercial kitchen. A home-based baker could probably price the cake in the ballpark of $3/serving.

JennTheCakeLadie Posted 6 Nov 2011 , 5:26am
post #3 of 9

I am also in california. We charge $3.50 per person for a buttercream covered cake, and $2-$3 per cupcake, depending on how intricate the cupcakes are, whether or not they are filled, etc. I understand that you don't want to overcharge, but don't sell yourself short either. My very first wedding cake I ever did, after I paid for the supplies, I did the math after the fact and realized I had paid myself about $0.50 an hour for labor, which is utterly ridiculous. Don't forget to include the cost of any boxes you use for transport, pillars, stands, etc.

Also keep in mind that it is much harder to raise your prices later. If someone tells their friend who is getting married next year how awesome your cake was and how much it cost, and that friend calls back and you tell them it will be twice as much for the same thing, it will be a problem.


Jessicakes831 Posted 6 Nov 2011 , 5:56am
post #4 of 9

Well the way that I do it is I charge a flat rate for every serving. I'm a beginner also so I usually charge $1/serving. Then, I account for additional decorations. Gumpaste figures are a few dollars, flowers are 25-50 cents, etc. Or you could do an extra 25 cents per serving if the bride wants swirls all over her cake or something. I hope that helps!

mommachris Posted 6 Nov 2011 , 8:02am
post #5 of 9

Jessy...not to be rude but at that price you are paying her to take your cake.
Prices have gone up so much in the last year that no one (NO matter your location) can break even charging $1 per serving.

If your family doesn't mind you skimming from their food budget to gift cake than no problem. Mine wouldn't be too happy with me. icon_biggrin.gif


peg818 Posted 6 Nov 2011 , 2:20pm
post #6 of 9

agree mommachris. Those prices aren't even covering costs. Jessy you are worth more.

MCurry Posted 6 Nov 2011 , 5:10pm
post #7 of 9

Minimum $3 dollars per slice but ingredients such as eggs and butter so you may have to go as high at $4 per slice. Cupcakes $2.25 - $2.75 each if they are without any design. You really need to review your cost and check out the competition in the area to see what they are charging. Some will have base info on their websites.

Jason_Kraft is right about cottage laws. Additionally, the bride needs to make sure that the venue will allow outside cakes/desserts. Some will charge extra fees if they are not from their venue. Also, be prepared to prove you have liability insurance if the vendor ask the couple before approving. This happened to someone I know and guess what, they didn't have any!

CWR41 Posted 6 Nov 2011 , 9:08pm
post #8 of 9
Originally Posted by Jessicakes831

I'm a beginner also so I usually charge $1/serving.

Seriously, $1/serving was customary 30+ years ago in the '80s.

Even if you can make a profit at $1/serving, it's time to earn what others within the industry are getting rather than giving it away or undercutting competitors.

littleladyk Posted 7 Nov 2011 , 1:34am
post #9 of 9

Thank you all so much for your input, it is SO helpful!!!!!

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