Calculate 10" Based On 8" Price? (Wilton)

Decorating By Bridgette1129 Updated 4 Nov 2011 , 2:32pm by TexasSugar

Bridgette1129 Posted 2 Nov 2011 , 2:55am
post #1 of 10

Is the wilton chart (http://www.wilton.com/wedding/wedding-cakes/wedding-cake-data.cfm) accurate for cups of batter to make a x" cake?

I am just starting out with baking cakes for family and friends (as gifts) and have no idea how to calculate how much batter to make or how much it would cost me in ingredients for a cake in a size other than I have made.

Example: I made a chocolate cake (8"). Wilton says you need 3 cups of batter per 2" layer. So if I wanted to find the price of ingredients for a 10" I would find the difference in cups of batter? But is their suggestion accurate?

I don't want to just bake a ton of cakes to find out. Lol, thanks so much!

9 replies
MCurry Posted 2 Nov 2011 , 3:20am
post #2 of 10

I am familiar with the Wilton chart but loosely use it as a guide for cutting slices only and really do not use the batter or icing charts.

The amount of batter you need depends on a couple of things. First, the cake recipe you use and the overall height you want your cake to be post baking and filling. When I use a 2 inch pan, my goal is to have a cake that rises to the rim at 2 inches because I torte my cakes. Therefore, my finished cake without frosting are already 2 inches per pan. When I torte and add fillings, my cakes are at least 4 1/2 inches tall but no more than 5 inches. Depending on what recipe I use, this may be achieved with 3 or even more cups of batter. You will have to experiment with your recipes to see. I'd rather have too much batter than too little (been there done that!).

I do find that if I am moving from a 9 inch to a 10 inch cake, I usually have to make 1.5x or 2x the original recipe to make sure my cakes get the correct height.


Most people here would tend to agree that pricing cakes is based on factors such as cost of your ingredients, labor, overhead, etc. not cups of batter. There are past forum discussions here on costing.

A little long but I hope this help. Happy baking!

Bridgette1129 Posted 2 Nov 2011 , 3:42am
post #3 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by MCurry

You will have to experiment with your recipes to see. I'd rather have too much batter than too little (been there done that!).

I do find that if I am moving from a 9 inch to a 10 inch cake, I usually have to make 1.5x or 2x the original recipe to make sure my cakes get the correct height.


Most people here would tend to agree that pricing cakes is based on factors such as cost of your ingredients, labor, overhead, etc. not cups of batter. There are past forum discussions here on costing.




I have had experiences where I have run out of frosting 3 times for one cake... I know how that feels lol, so I can see how I'd want more batter. I'm surprised it would be 1.5-2x more for a 1 inch difference. Thanks for the example!

I totally agree that pricing isn't based on cups of batter. But I meant that I have my cost of ingredients figured out for an 8" cake let's say and want to know how much more in INGREDIENTS it will cost. Decorating a 10" cake versus a 8" isn't that much more time, but is more ingredients. I have the labor, overhead, etc prices figured out. icon_smile.gif

MCurry Posted 2 Nov 2011 , 3:54am
post #4 of 10

I hear you...LOL.

My red velvet cake was initially scaled for a 9 inch. However, the way the cake rises (bump in the middle- trying to tweak the recipe since I'm tired of cake scraps!) and for me to get a (2) 10 inch cakes to meet my height I have to double (2x) the original recipe. However, my vanilla cake would only need an additional 1/2 of the recipe added to get to (2) 10 inch cakes.

Perhaps you can use the Wilton model as a guide to determine pricing then when you make the cakes, adjust based on actual ingredient used unless you plan on making some to test your recipes out.

Happy baking!

Bridgette1129 Posted 2 Nov 2011 , 4:35am
post #5 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by MCurry

I hear you...LOL.

My red velvet cake was initially scaled for a 9 inch. However, the way the cake rises (bump in the middle- trying to tweak the recipe since I'm tired of cake scraps!) and for me to get a (2) 10 inch cakes to meet my height I have to double (2x) the original recipe. However, my vanilla cake would only need an additional 1/2 of the recipe added to get to (2) 10 inch cakes.

Perhaps you can use the Wilton model as a guide to determine pricing then when you make the cakes, adjust based on actual ingredient used unless you plan on making some to test your recipes out.

Happy baking!




Thanks so much! You've been a ton of help icon_smile.gif

TexasSugar Posted 2 Nov 2011 , 2:02pm
post #6 of 10

I'm slightly confused, are you asking if you use how many cups of batter to determine the cost of ever size cake you do?

Bridgette1129 Posted 2 Nov 2011 , 11:29pm
post #7 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasSugar

I'm slightly confused, are you asking if you use how many cups of batter to determine the cost of ever size cake you do?




No. I have only made 6" and 8" cakes so I was trying to find a way to figure out my cost in ingredients for a larger cake without trial and error.

For example: I was thinking if it costs me $5 in ingredients for a 8" chocolate cake and let's just say that used 3 cups, that maybe if a 10" used 5 cups that I could figure out the cost of a 10".

I don't know if that made any sense. Lol

TexasSugar Posted 3 Nov 2011 , 2:29pm
post #8 of 10

If you are figuring your cost for ingredients to factor on in the price of your cakes, you really don't have to do it for each size of cake.

Take an average cake that you do a lot of, do the math for it, then figure out the price per serving. That way when you do a larger cake you just have to look at the number of servings, multiply that by your price per serving and you have the price for the cake. It also gives you consistency and involves a lot more math.

If you have cakes that cost you different numbers to make, like a white cake vs chocolate cake (because you have to factor in at least the additional cost of chocolate) then you can either price your cakes using the higher numbers or find a number in the middle that you are comfortable with.

Bridgette1129 Posted 4 Nov 2011 , 2:26am
post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasSugar

If you are figuring your cost for ingredients to factor on in the price of your cakes, you really don't have to do it for each size of cake.

Take an average cake that you do a lot of, do the math for it, then figure out the price per serving. That way when you do a larger cake you just have to look at the number of servings, multiply that by your price per serving and you have the price for the cake. It also gives you consistency and involves a lot more math.




Wow, that's super simple. I didn't even think of that lol I feel stupid. Thanks icon_smile.gif

TexasSugar Posted 4 Nov 2011 , 2:32pm
post #10 of 10

Don't feel stupid. icon_smile.gif

http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-694973-pricing.html

This thread has some good information on pricing and some math examples.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%