sheilabelle Posted 30 Oct 2011 , 1:03pm
post #1 of

I have never done figure piping and when I ran across this on youtube I found it very interesting.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_8doUtSNHPI&feature=related

37 replies
Kiddiekakes Posted 30 Oct 2011 , 1:24pm
post #2 of

Wow..That is some great figure piping...It would be interesting to know what icing recipe they are using to holds it's shape so well.Mine seems to fall over when you pipe to high...too bad it wasn't in english too...Thanks for sharing!!

cabecakes Posted 30 Oct 2011 , 2:14pm
post #3 of

Yeah, I have seen this video before. It is pretty cool.

kakeladi Posted 30 Oct 2011 , 2:30pm
post #4 of

It's all about the icing! icon_smile.gif YOu must have the perfectly made icing. *The* master piping guy was Richard Snider (sp?) - long before Roland. He recommended boiled icing but I no longer have the recipe icon_sad.gif

Marianna46 Posted 30 Oct 2011 , 2:47pm
post #5 of

Boiled icing is also known as seven-minute frosting/icing. Here's a link to Paula Deen's version, which is the closest I found to the one I remember my mother making:
http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/paula-deen/7-minute-frosting-recipe/index.html
Wouldn't it be lovely to have that much control over a pastry bag? I kept thinking what the cake would look like if I tried doing that myself - not a pretty picture!

cakesnglass Posted 30 Oct 2011 , 3:06pm
post #6 of

Many many years ago I took classes at Wilton (chicago) and in Fl. with Roland W. Here are 2 recipes i've saved fro years hope it helps. icon_smile.gif
Boiled icing for figure piping:
3c. granulated sugar,2/3 c. of water.1/4 tsp.cream of tartar: cook these ingre. till 234 f.
in mixing bowl : 4Tblsp. meringue powder,2/3c lukewarm water and 1 1/4 c sifted-powder sugar.
beat the meringue with warm water until peaks form-add powdered sugar beata on med. till well blended. To this add the cooked mixture beat med. till light and fluffy. (for straight stand up figures add an additional 1 cup pow.sug. to that step.
___
this next recipe is basic buttercream, but the nice thing is you can smooth (paint) brush dipped in hot water, paper towel excess. you get a perfectly smooth very detailed look:
2lb powder sugar, 2c. hi-ratio shortening,1/3c water,1/2tsp.salt,2tsp.vanilla.
Mix sugar,1/2 c of short.,water,salt/van. beat 5min on low, add remaining short. beat 3-5min. low-med.#2 speed.

tarabara Posted 30 Oct 2011 , 4:07pm
post #7 of

Kakeladi, I found several books by a Richard Snyder on Amazon. Would you happen to know if the recipe you had for figure piping was in a book for piping flowers (he has a couple of those) or something else?

MsGF Posted 30 Oct 2011 , 5:51pm
post #8 of

Wow that is really awesome. That's for sharing that. Very Neat!

kakeladi Posted 4 Nov 2011 , 1:31am
post #9 of

Someone asked: .....books by a Richard Snyder on Amazon. Would you happen to know if the recipe you had for figure piping was in a book for piping flowers .........

I believe it is but really cant remember for sure. I vaguely remember it being one of the larger (in size) books.....not the one that would be about 5x7 - that has a yellow dustcover! Strange what our minds remember - I can 'see' the book in my mind still icon_smile.gif

.......
basic buttercream, but the nice thing is you can smooth (paint) brush dipped in hot water, paper towel excess. you get a perfectly smooth very detailed look:
2lb powder sugar, 2c. hi-ratio shortening,1/3c water,1/2tsp.salt,2tsp.vanilla.
Mix sugar,1/2 c of short.,water,salt/van. beat 5min on low, add remaining short. beat 3-5min. low-med.#2 speed...........

I believe this is the recipe Roland has you use in his class....It's good just not quite as good as the boiled.

FromScratchSF Posted 4 Nov 2011 , 3:04am

They make cakes like that here in Chinatown and they call the icing "whipped cream". I have no idea what they put in it to make it like that because it is super light and actually dries out almost like meringue but you can taste cream, no grit from powdered sugar, no shortening in it, not a meringue base. Other then that, like most things Chinatown and Chinese pastry, it's a mystery what's in it! icon_biggrin.gif Cool video, I should ask my friend to translate.

Apti Posted 4 Nov 2011 , 4:12am

WOW!

That is amazing! Thank you so much for sharing.

Apti Posted 4 Nov 2011 , 4:14am
Quote:
Originally Posted by FromScratchSF

They make cakes like that here in Chinatown and they call the icing "whipped cream". I have no idea what they put in it to make it like that because it is super light and actually dries out almost like meringue but you can taste cream, no grit from powdered sugar, no shortening in it, not a meringue base. Other then that, like most things Chinatown and Chinese pastry, it's a mystery what's in it! icon_biggrin.gif Cool video, I should ask my friend to translate.




Please, please do ask your friend. See if there is any way he/she can get the recipe for the icing.

FromScratchSF Posted 4 Nov 2011 , 4:58am

Alrighty, because I am OCD, I actually learned about all I could from this... Thanks Google translate!

This was made in Viet Nam, by a food distributor. Title of the video is "How to make a birthday cake part 4". If you click on the person's other uploaded videos they have parts 1-3 also posted. It was as I suspected, mystery powder that the chef keeps mixing with bottled water. He demonstrates filling all kinds of cakes with it then finishes with decorating with it in part 4. It is the "whipped cream" typical in Asian bakeries.

Interesting techniques, part 1:
http://www.youtube.com/user/liekata#p/u/22/z-_Vjdyc10s

Part 2 (shows mixing of the mystery powder a lot):
http://www.youtube.com/user/liekata#p/u/21/hrhQl_T7ehc

Part 3:
http://www.youtube.com/user/liekata#p/u/19/N-QXagWgLSQ

I also google translated the company website, here's their recipe for their "Flan Powder Sponge Cake", in case anyone is interested:

· Name of Product: flan powder (sponge cake)

° You Package: 12.5kg/bao; 25kg/bao

· Key Ingredients: Wheat flour, sugar, milk powder, butter, food additives

Formulated:

+ Flour Sponge flan cake: 1000gr

+ Eggs: 400gr

+ Water: 350 grams

· Option Preparations:

+ Put the flour, egg (isolated case), which in mortars

+ Go slow 1 minute, fast 6 minutes, then beat at low speed 1 minute

+ Place the mold canvas

+ Bake in oven at 170c temperature from-180C

+ Baking time: 18-22 minutes

icon_biggrin.gif

Apti Posted 4 Nov 2011 , 5:37am

From Scratch--you are the BOMB! I too went to a bunch of other sites, but am a computer dork and couldn't find out how to make google translate work. I did establish that this is Vietnamese, and guess what......? One of my BEST friends is Vietnamese!!!! Can you believe it?

Oh boy, oh boy. I'm gonna have her find that mystery powder and try making this "whipped cream" icing. I'll be sure and post any information.

Marianna46 Posted 7 Nov 2011 , 12:02am

Apti and FromScratchSF, we are all humbly grateful and awaiting the next installment of this saga with bated breath!

cakeyouverymuch Posted 7 Nov 2011 , 12:47am

Is she really using a Rich's product in this video? Would one be able to do this with bettercreme or pastry pride or the rich's whipped topping?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SWlZ7mh3bGQ&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6w7eAzDpbKw&feature=related

and here's another one that appears to be chantilly cream:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=65c8-8pqu7o&feature=related

Charmed Posted 7 Nov 2011 , 1:02am

icon_surprised.gif I can't stand the wait!!

FromScratchSF Posted 7 Nov 2011 , 1:17am

I have never used Bettercreme, but it could be what they are using for this stuff. I mean, the 1st video was made from a powder, but I'm sure there are lots of products out there for this type of "whipped cream" icing.

FromScratchSF Posted 7 Nov 2011 , 1:21am

OK, just found this:

"There's no recipe at all. You can buy it from stores. It's actually a whipped cream. Pour n' Whip. A good brand is Vivo. you can only buy it I think is from singapore and vietnam. But there are also other brands like Avoset and the like. They are ready to use cream. It should be chilled first before whipping it into the desired consistency. Making Flowers and any decorations are good with soft peak."

So there you go.

cakeyouverymuch Posted 7 Nov 2011 , 1:28am
Quote:
Originally Posted by FromScratchSF

I have never used Bettercreme, but it could be what they are using for this stuff. I mean, the 1st video was made from a powder, but I'm sure there are lots of products out there for this type of "whipped cream" icing.




Because of the final product, I just assumed that the powder in use was some sort of instant mousse mix.

In the new year I'm going to have to make some chantilly cream and give this a try. I'm also going to try and access some Rich's whipped topping and give that a try as well.

Apti Posted 7 Nov 2011 , 1:54am
Quote:
Originally Posted by FromScratchSF

OK, just found this:

"There's no recipe at all. You can buy it from stores. It's actually a whipped cream. Pour n' Whip. A good brand is Vivo. you can only buy it I think is from singapore and vietnam. But there are also other brands like Avoset and the like. They are ready to use cream. It should be chilled first before whipping it into the desired consistency. Making Flowers and any decorations are good with soft peak."

So there you go.




ScratchSF, I bow deeply in respect.

Here's a link for Avoset Int'l non-dairy Pour & Whip:
http://www.benfoods.com/details.php?catid=3&subcatid=3&subsubcatid=1&but=5

Vivo (from Fuji Sunny Foods Pte. Ltd.)
http://www.fsf.com.sg/whipping_cream.html

Vivo recipe for sponge cake with whipped cream Vivo topping (Huh? I cannot decipher the recipe.....)
http://www.fsf.com.sg/pdf/Xmas_snowball.pdf

FromScratchSF Posted 7 Nov 2011 , 2:04am
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakeyouverymuch

Quote:
Originally Posted by FromScratchSF

I have never used Bettercreme, but it could be what they are using for this stuff. I mean, the 1st video was made from a powder, but I'm sure there are lots of products out there for this type of "whipped cream" icing.



Because of the final product, I just assumed that the powder in use was some sort of instant mousse mix.

In the new year I'm going to have to make some chantilly cream and give this a try. I'm also going to try and access some Rich's whipped topping and give that a try as well.




I don't think this would work with traditional chantilly cream. It would never hold up like this, it's too heavy, but I'd love to see if you were able to make it work!

cakeyouverymuch Posted 7 Nov 2011 , 2:10am

And yet. . . . .all three of the following claim to be decorating with chantilly cream...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=65c8-8pqu7o&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=29JjrPoLry0&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qAC3Py4tDNU&NR=1&feature=fvwp

imagenthatnj Posted 7 Nov 2011 , 2:18am

My sister in Ecuador uses chantilly cream to decorate all her cakes. I'm trying to steer her away from it and go into IMBC.

I do think that she doesn't whip real cream with sugar. I think they sell a powder that she mixes (have to ask her about it) kind of like meringue powder. But yes, everybody likes that cream, especially on top of cupcakes. She does mostly dessert cakes and the shells and piping do stand to their shapes.

cakeyouverymuch Posted 7 Nov 2011 , 2:48am
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagenthatnj

My sister in Ecuador uses chantilly cream to decorate all her cakes. I'm trying to steer her away from it and go into IMBC.

I do think that she doesn't whip real cream with sugar. I think they sell a powder that she mixes (have to ask her about it) kind of like meringue powder. But yes, everybody likes that cream, especially on top of cupcakes. She does mostly dessert cakes and the shells and piping do stand to their shapes.




Would the powdered product she uses be something like Dr Oetker's Whip It?

imagenthatnj Posted 7 Nov 2011 , 3:02am

I have no idea. I think I asked her once if she made it with whipping cream and sugar and she said no, it was a powder. Maybe something like this?

http://www.21food.com/showroom/110085/product/powdered-whipped-cream.html

Who knows? I just know that people love chantilly so much over there that they want it on every cake and they want it on every cupcake and in Quito, the capital, street vendors sell cones filled with chantilly cream and nothing else! You know they are not carrying a fridge with them. lol

FromScratchSF Posted 7 Nov 2011 , 3:19am

Calling something "whipped cream" and "chantilly cream" in this business means nothing. Everyone calls their icing "buttrcream" when it's made with zero butter and zero cream. People call candy melts "chocolate" when it contains zero real chocolate. Not trying to be argumentative, but I've made lots of traditional whipped cream using heavy whipping cream and sugar, and I've also made lots of chantlly cream using heavy whipping cream and powdered sugar... and I can tell you having eaten lots of cake from Chinese bakeries here that what they call "whipped cream" or "chantilly cream" ain't real whipped cream or chantilly cream. It's some sort of mystery non-dairy product. Tastes great, would hold up in the apocalypse, does not need to be refrigerated, and it can be piped and sculpted into all sorts of stuff.

Apti Posted 7 Nov 2011 , 3:38am

Whatever icing concoction they are using, these videos provide an excellent reference for the individual steps needed to create the different people, poses, and creatures. I have virtually no artistic skills and it has taken nearly 2 years to even understand the concept of creating fondant and buttercream figures a step at a time.

These videos show HOW they create a dragon, person, hand, face, ears, etc. That is fascinating.

FromScratchSF Posted 7 Nov 2011 , 4:35am

Apti, you are soooo right! You think it looks cool in the video, you should see it in person. Pretty amazing.

Evoir Posted 7 Nov 2011 , 4:39am

We have a product in Australia which is sold cold or frozen, in something that looks like a cardboard milk carton. You let it return to liquid state (cold) then beat it for 20 minutes or so (I think) and you end up with something non-crusting you can put on your cake and then you can leave out in room temperature for hours, no refrigeration. One litre makes a LOT once you beat it up. Is this similar to what you in the USA call "Bettercreme"?

The women in my cake deco supply store raved about it, saying it tasted beeeooootiful, but I tried it and found it dreadful. I looked at the arms-length list of ingredients (read:chemicals) on the back of the carton and its no wonder. There's nothing real in there at all! It tastes light, and less sweet than regular abc, but its a weird thing.

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