First Wding Cake - Tiers And Leveling

Decorating By karukaru Updated 27 Oct 2011 , 12:56am by karukaru

karukaru Posted 26 Oct 2011 , 9:06pm
post #1 of 8

Hi Everyone!
I am going to bake the cakes for my first wedding cake (due on saturday) and I was just going to do two layers on each tier but I have seen that people usually do 4. Is that the standard on wedding cakes? Also, will it be as stable as the two layered ones? I have only made 2 tiered cakes (this one will have 3 layers) and they are usually filled something dense like buttercream, nutella, dulce de leche, etc etc etc. This cake will be filled with raspberry filling (from a sleeve bag) but someone told me that the fondant wont be as smooth on the sides if I put too much icing, and that they tend to be more unstable (this has never happened to me since I always do a ring of buttercream to hold the fillings - I have also done this the few times that I did fruit fillings) so now I am nervous. Any thoughts or tips? Thanks in advance! icon_biggrin.gif


A sketch of the cake is attached

7 replies
karukaru Posted 26 Oct 2011 , 9:22pm
post #2 of 8

Oh, I forgot to add the layers are chocolate and vanilla WASC. The cake is for my friend and he didn't specify if he wanted 2 layers or 4. Thanks!

carmijok Posted 26 Oct 2011 , 9:55pm
post #3 of 8

Your sketch did not attach. Are you talking about a 4 tier cake? Or a 2-tier cake with four torted layers? How many are you planning on serving?
You always should put a stiff dam around the edges of your filling. But you will have to let it settle so there is no bulging under your fondant. Some people put a tile on top to weight it. I don't cover my cakes with fondant so I'm not well versed in how thick to make your buttercream undercoat. I know some people prefer ganache. A few days before the wedding is a strange time to be asking questions like this. I mean wedding cakes are a very big deal and I would want a lot of practice prior to producing one. No matter what, just plan on it taking a lot longer than you think it will.

karukaru Posted 26 Oct 2011 , 10:25pm
post #4 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by carmijok

Your sketch did not attach. Are you talking about a 4 tier cake? Or a 2-tier cake with four torted layers? How many are you planning on serving?
You always should put a stiff dam around the edges of your filling. But you will have to let it settle so there is no bulging under your fondant. Some people put a tile on top to weight it. I don't cover my cakes with fondant so I'm not well versed in how thick to make your buttercream undercoat. I know some people prefer ganache. A few days before the wedding is a strange time to be asking questions like this. I mean wedding cakes are a very big deal and I would want a lot of practice prior to producing one. No matter what, just plan on it taking a lot longer than you think it will.





Thanks. Maybe I am not explaining myself right. I am making a 3 tier cake with two layers each cake (one vanilla and the other one chocolate, which is fine for my friend.). I was just wondering if it is a standard practice to do 4 torted layers for a wedding. I have made 2 tiered cakes with fruit filling but I usually do other types of filling. I always put a ring/dam of buttercream so the filling doesn't overflow and I have never had a problem with it (I also do a thick buttercream crumb coat.) I was just wondering because this person started talking about the layers of cake sliding or bulging under the fondant, which has never happened to me, so I wanted to cover all my bases. I am not experimenting with the cake. Since I am married I obviously know that wedding cakes are a big deal (I had a pretty big wedding and I was a bit of a bridezilla) so I want to make it as special as possible for my dear friend. In fact, this is so important to me that I paid for a professional cake decorator to supervise me all day @ her shop while I decorate the cake on Friday (my hubby took the day off to take care of our kids.) This will be my gift to him and his fiance so I want it to be Perfect.

karukaru Posted 26 Oct 2011 , 10:34pm
post #5 of 8

I forgot to add that I have never torted the cake in four layers, just 2. That is why I was asking if the layers make a difference or not in the structure of the cake. Thanks.

KoryAK Posted 26 Oct 2011 , 11:43pm
post #6 of 8

4" of cake is 4" of cake, be it four 1" layers or two 2" layers. You'll be fine if you don't overdo the filling and use icing dams icon_smile.gif

mariacakestoo Posted 26 Oct 2011 , 11:44pm
post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by karukaru

I forgot to add that I have never torted the cake in four layers, just 2. That is why I was asking if the layers make a difference or not in the structure of the cake. Thanks.


Well you wouldn't torte one layer into 4 separate layers. You torte two individual layers into two individual layers, of which you now have 4 layers to make one tier. Good luck!

karukaru Posted 27 Oct 2011 , 12:56am
post #8 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by mariacakestoo

Quote:
Originally Posted by karukaru

I forgot to add that I have never torted the cake in four layers, just 2. That is why I was asking if the layers make a difference or not in the structure of the cake. Thanks.

Well you wouldn't torte one layer into 4 separate layers. You torte two individual layers into two individual layers, of which you now have 4 layers to make one tier. Good luck!




Yes, that is what I meant. Something got lost in translation Hahaha. English is not my first language. When I said "torted 1 cake into 4" I meant a four layer tier; and when I said "just 2" I meant a 2 layer tier. I now I realize is kind of dumb to say because if the cake has 2 "2" inch layers then there is no cutting, just stacking LOL. That is what I get for trying to post something using my phone in one hand, and holding my 12 month old with the other one! Hahaha icon_biggrin.gif

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