A Two Tiered Cake - Questions!

Decorating By Wildgirl Updated 29 Oct 2011 , 1:32am by jules5000

Wildgirl Posted 26 Oct 2011 , 3:51am
post #1 of 32

Now the bride wants just two round tiers. I have 7", 8" and 9" pans. I'm assuming that one of these can work for the top layer - which would you suggest that I use? What size for the bottom then?

Servings don't really matter as I'm making sheet cakes for the remainder (they won't be displayed). This cake is basically for "show" (it will be cut though) and for them to "cut the cake" I had made a trial 8" cake for her to taste and she said that size would be fine (she's the opposite of a bridezilla and wants it all very simple). I was thinking though that since it's a wedding cake, it should look a little more.... substantial, I guess. I don't want to do too huge though so it's not too intimidating for me (my first tier).

And - please give me your suggestions for making it NOT look like a hat! icon_lol.gif

31 replies
pj22 Posted 26 Oct 2011 , 4:41am
post #2 of 32

I'm guessing a 9" inch with a 6" top tier. 7" would probably be too large.

CWR41 Posted 26 Oct 2011 , 4:44am
post #3 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wildgirl

Now the bride wants just two round tiers. I have 7", 8" and 9" pans. I'm assuming that one of these can work for the top layer - which would you suggest that I use? What size for the bottom then?




With your available pan options, I'd make a 7" & a 9".

Typical top tiers are 6" (7" is close enough), and a 9" base tier will be more substantial than the 8" (it will look more proportional than only 1" difference between sizes). I don't see too many other choices.

destineysway Posted 26 Oct 2011 , 5:26am
post #4 of 32

it would come out better if you had a 6'' pan but with what you have on hand i would go with the 9 and the 7

MCurry Posted 26 Oct 2011 , 5:34am
post #5 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by destineysway

it would come out better if you had a 6'' pan but with what you have on hand i would go with the 9 and the 7




Agreed. Perhaps you can get a 6 inch cake board and trim the 7 inch down.

leah_s Posted 26 Oct 2011 , 7:56am
post #6 of 32

Toppers are sized to look best on the standard 6" tier, so that really would be best.

Wildgirl Posted 26 Oct 2011 , 6:21pm
post #7 of 32

She won't even be using a topper. I'm still planning it, but there will probably just be buttercream roses scattered on it. As far as sizes - I'm ready to order another size to make it work the best (this is a good excuse to get more pans icon_wink.gif ) So either I can use my 9" and buy a couple of 6", or I can use a 7" as a topper and buy a larger bottom.

I am totally at your mercy here - I don't really know what these sizes actually all look like in actual cake!

Wildgirl Posted 27 Oct 2011 , 3:29am
post #8 of 32

I have some supply places open on my computer, just ready to put in an order icon_smile.gif It might help if I try to simplify my last question -

For a small wedding cake, should I do a 9" base with 6" top or a 7" top with a 10" bottom? I'm not sure which would "look" better?

CWR41 Posted 27 Oct 2011 , 5:29am
post #9 of 32

If you're looking for an excuse to buy more pans, instead of getting two 6" pans, you could buy a 6" and a 10". These are pan sizes that are common and you may be able to get a lot of future use with for wedding cakes and other tiered cakes. I like the look of a 6" with a 10" or any sizes that are 4" apart.

destineysway Posted 27 Oct 2011 , 6:00am
post #10 of 32

yes, 6 and 10 in cake pans are used more often than any other for smaller cakes. but im am attaching a cake i have done recently that was a 10 and a 6 in just to give you an idea of what it might look like

http://cakecentral.com/gallery/2127725

Wildgirl Posted 27 Oct 2011 , 6:23am
post #11 of 32

Thanks for the picture - that really helps!

destineysway Posted 27 Oct 2011 , 6:26am
post #12 of 32

your welcome, wish you the best on the cake make sure to post so we can all see! icon_smile.gif

gidgetdoescakes Posted 27 Oct 2011 , 6:28am
post #13 of 32

you can always cut the 7 inch cake to a 6 inch

lilmissbakesalot Posted 27 Oct 2011 , 9:38am
post #14 of 32

For smaller serving needs I usually suggest a 4-6-8 combination. It's 35 servings and too cute for words and you get three tiers which makes a better presentation for a wedding.

Image

Image

I like smaller top tiers... 98% of the time the top tiers of my cakes are either 4" or 5". If you are going with a 2 tiered version I'd do a 6 over a 9" with the pans you have. Bake the 7" and trim it to 6". If it is really just for show I'd probably go with a 5" over an 8".

Image

I like the proportions more than with the 6" top tier.

Wildgirl Posted 27 Oct 2011 , 3:21pm
post #15 of 32

Wow - awesome pictures - awesome cakes!!

So much great advice too. I guess I have to decide it I want to try 3 tiers or not. The bride honestly doesn't care (she would be fine with just a one layer!!) I just want to give her something beautiful. 3 tiers seems like a no-brainer then, except for the fact that I've never done tiers. I feel "safe" with two - seems easy enough to keep level. But adding a 3rd tier kind of scares me.... I don't want to present the leaning tower of Tina. But at least they aren't huge heavy cakes. Hmmmm.

Would you center dowel a 4-6-8? I also have to transport it 30 min's away. Maybe I could just put the top on there....

carolinagirlcakes Posted 27 Oct 2011 , 3:40pm
post #16 of 32

I personally use center dowel on even my 2-tier cakes. Better safe than sorry. And not sure where you live but you can get the 6" wilton pans really cheap at walmart.

Wildgirl Posted 27 Oct 2011 , 3:53pm
post #17 of 32

I'll admit too, that I am afraid of pounding down a center dowel. I invision it not wanting to go through the cake boards and somehow displacing the support dowels (I found some bubble tea straws!) and squishing the cakes. Could this happen?

pinklatte Posted 27 Oct 2011 , 3:54pm
post #18 of 32

I like the look of the 4" cake topper. Very pretty work.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lilmissbakesalot

For smaller serving needs I usually suggest a 4-6-8 combination. It's 35 servings and too cute for words and you get three tiers which makes a better presentation for a wedding.

Image

Image

I like smaller top tiers... 98% of the time the top tiers of my cakes are either 4" or 5". If you are going with a 2 tiered version I'd do a 6 over a 9" with the pans you have. Bake the 7" and trim it to 6". If it is really just for show I'd probably go with a 5" over an 8".

Image

I like the proportions more than with the 6" top tier.


carolinagirlcakes Posted 27 Oct 2011 , 4:02pm
post #19 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wildgirl

I'll admit too, that I am afraid of pounding down a center dowel. I invision it not wanting to go through the cake boards and somehow displacing the support dowels (I found some bubble tea straws!) and squishing the cakes. Could this happen?




I use the bamboo dowels by wilton. I actually use the lollipop ones for the support dowels in each layer and then the longer 12" ones (cut to length if need be) for the center. I use a pencil sharpner on one end to give it a small point and I have had no issues getting mine to push through the boards. When I get to the very bottom I push it through the board that sits on the base and just slightly into the base to secure it. That takes a little more pressure than the boards but I have never had problems with it off setting my cakes or messing with my support dowels.

Wildgirl Posted 27 Oct 2011 , 4:15pm
post #20 of 32

Ok, I will of course do a trial run and try the bamboo sticks. I didn't even realize Wilton made them - figured we'd need a run to the hardware store for dowels.

kakeladi Posted 27 Oct 2011 , 4:26pm
post #21 of 32

If yu use a pencil sharpener to make a sharp point on the long dowel it will go through w/o a single problem with a good sharp pounding.
I have a small hammer & use it not on the 'ball' part but turn it sideways - it's a tad wider that wayicon_smile.gif

Wildgirl Posted 27 Oct 2011 , 4:29pm
post #22 of 32

lol! Good tip - I could see missing and smashing the cake!

carolinagirlcakes Posted 27 Oct 2011 , 4:31pm
post #23 of 32

I don't have to use a hammer... I just push it through and have no issues. I so however have to either put my weight behind me when I push through the bottom board and part of the base.

Good luck. You can find them at Michaels or Walmart most of the time.

cfpeoples Posted 27 Oct 2011 , 4:44pm
post #24 of 32

I totally agree with lilmissbakesalot. I was thinking the exact same thing! The 4 inch barely adds any more cake....just for effect. It makes it so much more beautiful. Makes sure you use supports and a dowel. Leah-s always recommends the SPS system, which is a wonderful system but it does not sound like something you have on hand. But this is a small cake so I think it will be fine with bubble tea straws and a center dowel.

Wildgirl Posted 27 Oct 2011 , 5:41pm
post #25 of 32

Ok, what about a 5"-7"-9"? All I'd have to get are 5" pans then. Would that look much different from the 4"-6"-8"?

lilmissbakesalot Posted 28 Oct 2011 , 2:12pm
post #26 of 32

5-7-9 is a great cake too... a 4-7-10 is also great for future reference.

I use bubble tea straws and a center dowel in every tiered cake. Better safe than sorry is my mantra. I sharpen the center dowel with a pencil sharpener that is dedicated to cake use and I can just push it through with my hands. I cut it shorter than the cake and use another dowel to push it in the rest of the way once it goes into the cake and into the base board (I use cake drums).

Good luck with your cake!! icon_biggrin.gif

mariacakestoo Posted 28 Oct 2011 , 5:42pm
post #27 of 32

4-6-8. 5-7-9, like those, are my favorite combos. I avoid using 6" top tiers at all costs, they just look too squatty to me. Little miss has some of the best smaller tiered cakes out ther, as you can see. icon_wink.gif

Wildgirl Posted 28 Oct 2011 , 7:20pm
post #28 of 32

Great - I'll get a couple of 5" then and do a trial run - with the dowel too. I also need to find out more about the cake drum - I continue to learn here!!! I could hug all of you, this has been/continues to be an invaluable source of knowledge!

lilmissbakesalot Posted 29 Oct 2011 , 12:34am
post #29 of 32

Wilton makes cake drums and you can get them at Michael's and such places. In reality it is just 3 cake boards glued together and covered in fancy foil. There are different brands and some are stronger than others, but for a wee lil'cake like this... gluing boards together so that the corregations go in opposite directions would be more than fine.

Wildgirl Posted 29 Oct 2011 , 12:51am
post #30 of 32

Perfect. Thank you so much!!

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